Globalization, Developing Countries and Markets Colloquium

Professors Eleanor Fox and Dennis Davis
Tuesdays, 12:00-1:50 pm, Furman Hall, Room 310

LAW-LW.12249.001
2 credits

Globalization impacts the world and especially impacts developing countries. It can pull people out of poverty, but it can also harm the poor and vulnerable. High technology, big data, and artificial intelligence can make lives better, but they also threaten exploitation and exclusion. This colloquium will be devoted to challenges of developing countries in the global environment. We will explore how markets may benefit and harm developing countries and how forces of globalization can be harnessed to work for economic development. Coverage will include studies of specific countries and regions, such as China and sub-Saharan Africa; and issue-specific problems such as poverty, inequality, corruption, environment, trade, and competition. In 9 of the 14 sessions, leading scholars will present papers. Students will be assigned to prepare a 1-2 page reaction paper for 2 of these sessions. Students must prepare a research paper appropriate for a 2-credit course, which is an Option B paper (5000 words) or may elect to prepare a longer paper for an additional credit. The longer paper is an Option A paper (10,000 words). Students will also be required to participate in a presentation based on themes from their research paper.

Fall 2019 Schedule of Guest Speakers

If you plan to attend a Colloquium session and would like the accompanying materials, please write Brendan Heldenfels at heldenfels@mercury.law.nyu.edu.

SEPTEMBER 10
Development and the state - the case of China
Yasheng Huang
Epoch Foundation Professor of International Management
Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
China’s state-led capitalism

SEPTEMBER 17
Labor and economic development

Eric Verhoogen
Professor of International and Public Affairs and Economics
Columbia School of International and Public Affairs
Co-Director, Center for Development Economics and Policy
Technology adoption by soccer ball producers in Pakistan
"Organizational Barriers to Technology Adoption: Evidence from Soccer-Ball Producers in Pakistan" (Quarterly Journal of Economics 2017)
"How Labor Standards Can Be Good for Growth" (Harvard Business Review April 2016)

OCTOBER 1
Environment
Bryce Rudyk
Adjunct Professor of Law
NYU Law
Climate Program Director, Guarini Center on Environmental, Energy, and Land Use Law
Climate Change, Development and Small and Developing Economies

OCTOBER 8 
Corruption, transnational bribery and development
Kevin E. Davis
Beller Family Professor of Business Law
NYU Law
Effect of bribery on development; themes from new book, BETWEEN IMPUNITY AND IMPERIALISM: THE REGULATION OF TRANSNATIONAL BRIBERY 

OCTOBER 22
Wealth, inequality and development
Katharina Pistor
Edwin B. Parker Professor of Comparative Law
Columbia Law School
Director of Center on Global Legal Transformation  
Themes from new book, THE CODE OF CAPITAL: HOW THE LAW CREATES WEALTH AND INEQUALITY

OCTOBER 29
Competition law and developing countries

Liberty Mncube (with D. Davis and E. Fox)
Associate Professor of Economics
University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Former chief economist, South African Competition Commission
Competition law and the value of inclusion; harnessing markets to empower; to address poverty and inequality

NOVEMBER 5
State capture and fragile developing-country democracies
David Lewis
First chair of South African Competition Tribunal
Founder and head of NGO Corruption Watch
State capture, corruption, and the challenge to democracy in South Africa

NOVEMBER 12
International law and development
James Thuo Gathii
Wing-Tat Lee Chair in International Law and Professor of Law
Loyola University (Chicago) Law School
Understanding African Regional Trade Agreements on Their Own Terms

NOVEMBER 19
Growth, poverty and development
William Easterly
Professor of Economics, New York University
Co-director, NYU Development Research Institute
In Search of Reforms for Growth: New Stylized Facts on Policy and Growth Outcomes

***
Pending approval, 2 New York CLE credits in the Area of Professional Practice will be given to both experienced and newly attorneys (those admitted to the New York Bar for less than two years) and is presented in traditional (in person) format.

Questions about the Colloquium should be addressed to Brendan Heldenfels at heldenfels@mercury.law.nyu.edu or (212)998-6182.