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Academic Year 2016-2017

 

Susanne Augenhofer NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowSusanne Augenhofer
Senior Global Research Fellow
Germany

Susanne Augenhofer is a Professor of Law at Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany, holding the chair for Civil Law, European Private Law, Comparative Law and Market-regulation through Consumer and Competition law since December 2013. In spring 2016, she was serving as visiting professor at Columbia Law School.

Before her appointment as associate professor at Humboldt University in 2009, she conducted research at the Max-Planck-Institute for Comparative and International Private Law (Hamburg, Germany), the London School of Economics (Great Britain) and the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Professor Augenhofer studied law at the University of Graz (Austria, Mag. Iur.), the Universitá Statale di Milano (Italy), the University of Vienna (Austria, doctor iuris), and as a Fulbright scholar at Yale Law School (LL.M.) as well as at the Free University Berlin (Germany, LL.M.), where she was supported by a Yale Fox Fellowship. She has been a visiting scholar at Yale Law School in 2013 and 2014 and was appointed associate research scholar in law in 2014.

Her focus in teaching and research ranges from (international) contract and consumer law to fair trading law and antitrust law—with a special emphasis on the enforcement of rights and legal comparison in the context of the harmonisation of private law in the EU and transnational settings. Her current research focuses on self-regulation privacy law, the TTIP, and the private enforcement of antitrust law.

Professor Augenhofer is a Fellow of the European Law Institute (ELI). She has advised the European Parliament and the European Commission on various issues regarding European fair trading law and its enforcement. She is the co-founder of the Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic, the first German legal clinic for consumer rights.

Center Affiliation: Center for Law, Economics, and Organization
Research Project: Liability for Corporate Speech

 

Maria Adele Carrai NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowMaria Adele Carrai
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Italy

Maria Adele Carrai is a Max Weber Fellow in Law at the European University Institute. After spending a year as a visiting doctoral researcher at NYU, she received her PhD in international law from the University of Hong Kong, where she was a Hong Kong PhD Fellow and a Swire Scholar. Her dissertation, titled 'A Genealogy of Sovereignty in China, 1840-today,' investigates how the concept of sovereignty was appropriated and used by Chinese intellectuals and diplomats from the end of the Qing dynasty, emphasizing how such appropriation was essential for Chinese modern history.

She was trained as a sinologist and political scientist, receiving her education in Italy at the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” University Ca’ Foscari of Venice and University of Bologna, in the United Kingdom at the School of Oriental and African Studies and China at the China University of Political Science and Law and Central University of Finance and Economics.

Her primary research focus is the history of international law in China within a global history framework, and how today China can influence the international legal order in the making.

Center Affiliation: Institute for International Law and Justice
Research Project: International Legal Orders and Legitimacy: Where does Chinese Exceptionalism Fit?

 

Debora Diniz NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowDebora Diniz (Spring)
Senior Global Research Fellow
Brazil

An anthropologist by training, Debora Diniz is currently a professor at the Law Faculty of the University of Brasília and at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching interests include feminist bioethics, gender studies, sexual and reproductive health and rights, criminal and juvenile justice, mental health, disability and research methods. In 2010, Diniz published the first national survey on abortion in Brazil, which was awarded by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in 2011 for public health excellence. In 2013, she led the first national census of forensic hospitals.

Diniz is Co-Editor of the Developing World Bioethics Journal and Vice-Chair of the International Women's Health Coalition (IWHC). She is the founder of Anis – Institute of Bioethics, a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization dedicated to promoting equal citizenship and human rights for women and minorities. She has strong advocacy experience working with the Brazilian Supreme Court on cases involving abortion, marriage equality, secular state, stem cell research, and the Zika virus public health crisis. She also directed seven human rights documentary films, which combined won over 60 awards.

Center Affiliation: Center for Research in Crime and Justice
Research Project: When Writing is Surviving: Girls at Correctional Juvenile Facilities in Brazil - A Study on Punishment and Rights.

 

Aman Gebru NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowAman Gebru (Spring)
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Ethiopia

Aman is a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. His general research interests are intellectual property, innovation, and development. His SJD dissertation focuses on intellectual property law, bioprospecting, and traditional knowledge. Aman’s research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as the Asper Review of International Business and Trade Law and Haramaya Law Review. He is a Global Justice Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and a fellow of the Center for Innovation Law and Policy, both at the University of Toronto. He is also a Doctoral Student Scholarship Recipient at the International Law Research Program of the Center for International Governance Innovation, a non-partisan think-tank based in Waterloo, Canada.

Aman received an LLM in intellectual property laws and policies from the University of Washington and wrote his thesis on the international access and benefit-sharing agreement on the teff genetic resource. He also has an LLB from Haramaya University in Ethiopia. Aman taught intellectual property law (domestic and international), international investment law and law and development in different institutions including the University of Ontario Institute of Technology and Haramaya University. He has worked as a research assistant in Landesa (formerly Rural Development Institute) - a non-profit based in Seattle advocating for land rights for the poor, and interned with the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.      

Center Affiliation: Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy
Research Project: Challenges in the Intellectual Property Protection of Traditional Knowledge: Searching for Solutions Using Proprietary and Open-Innovation Concepts

 

Jacob Giltaij NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowJacob Giltaij
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Netherlands

Dr. Jacob Giltaij (1981) is a Dutch legal historian currently working for the University of Helsinki in Finland. Having earned a Masters in International, European and Comparative law, he composed a dissertation on the complicated problem of the existence of human rights in Roman law. For the resulting work, he received his Ph.D. at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands in 2011. On the topic of human rights in Roman law, he has subsequently published various articles in international journals and collections, including a book contribution for Cambridge University Press on revisiting the origins of human rights. Other key publications are pieces for the Oxford Handbook of Roman law and society, the Bloomsbury´s Cultural history of law-series, and History of Political Thought. 

After having taken up a position teaching legal history and legal theory at the University of Amsterdam, since 2013 he has been working at a European Research Council project on the topic of the ´Reinvention of European legal culture 1934-1964´ (foundlaw.org), hosted by the University of Helsinki.  The project concerns various professors of Roman law examining the idea of a European legal culture before, during and after the Second World War. In this project, he focuses on the life and works of Fritz Schulz (1879-1957), a Jewish scholar of Roman law who was ousted from office by the Nazi regime and forced to flee to the UK when the War broke out.

The objective of his stay at NYU will be to collect, analyze and present archival sources pertaining to Schulz and other refugee scholars in the Anglo-American academic world from 1934 to 1964. 

Center Affiliation: Institute for International Law and Justice
Research Project: Refugee Legal Scholars, American Civil Rights and the European Project

 

Rudina Jasini NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowRudina Jasini
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Albania

Rudina Jasini is an attorney and researcher specialising in international criminal law and human rights law. She read for a DPhil in Law at the University of Oxford under the supervision of Professor Carolyn Hoyle. Her doctoral research centered on the participation of victims of gross violations of human rights as civil parties in international criminal proceedings. Dr. Jasini has been a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law. She has taught tutorials in public international law at Oxford University. Prior to her time at Oxford, she worked for the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague as a legal counsel on the defense team in the Haradinaj case. She also has extensive experience as a legal consultant with Impunity Watch and the Slynn Foundation. Dr. Jasini is the recipient of numerous academic awards and the author of several peer reviewed articles on international justice. She has presented her work at various conferences and symposia. In April 2015, she was elected to be a member of the International Law Association Committee on Complementarity in International Criminal Law. Dr. Jasini holds a DPhil (PhD) from Oxford University, an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Oxford, an LLM in International Legal Studies from Georgetown University Law Center and a BA in Law from the University of Tirana.

Center Affiliation: Center for Human Rights and Global Justice
Research Project: Public International Law, International Criminal Law and Human Rights Law

 

Tarun Khaitan NYU Law Global Research FellowTarun Khaitan (Fall)
Global Research Fellow
India

Tarun Khaitan is an Associate Professor and the Hackney Fellow in Law at Wadham College, Oxford. He is also an Associate of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. He completed his undergraduate studies (BA LLB Hons) at the National Law School (Bangalore) between 1999-2004. He then attended Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and completed his postgraduate studies (BCL, MPhil, DPhil) at Exeter College (Oxford). OUP has recently published his monograph entitled 'A Theory of Discrimination Law'. His research interests include discrimination law, Indian public law and legal theory.

Center Affiliation: Center for Human Rights and Global Justice
Research Project: Religious Freedom and Religious Discrimination

 

Adrian Kuenzler NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowAdrian Kuenzler
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Switzerland

Adrian is a Branco Weiss Fellow of Society in Science at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich. After having taught as Associate Lecturer at Zurich University School of Law he was a Swiss National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow and worked on a project on the history of European Competition Law at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies of the European University Institute in Florence. Adrian gained experience as a law clerk with an international business law firm and at the District Court of Zurich. He also served on the board of an international start-up company that helps advance the education industry.

Adrian's first book entitled “Efficiency or Freedom to Compete? On the Goals of the Law against Private Restraints on Competition” won the Issekutz Prize and the Empiris Award and was published by Mohr Siebeck and the Walter Eucken Institut. Some of Adrian’s recent writings appeared in the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, the European Competition Journal, an Oxford volume on the Historical Foundations of EU Competition Law, and the Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law.

Adrian received his Ph.D. from Zurich University and holds a Master of Law and J.S.D. degree from Yale Law School. His work draws on insights from the behavioral sciences to document the law’s role in stimulating new innovation and economic growth. It focuses on developing a novel set of responses to problems of consumer sovereignty within antitrust and intellectual property law.

Center Affiliation: Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy
Research Project: Advertising and Consumer Sovereignty

 

Andreas Kulick NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowAndreas Kulick (Fall)
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Germany

Andreas Kulick is a Senior Research Fellow at Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany.  He holds degrees from the Geneva Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (HEID), Humboldt University Berlin, NYU School of Law (LL.M. ’09, Fulbright scholar) the University of Tübingen (doctor iuris, summa cum laude, ’11). He was a visiting fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law at the University of Cambridge in 2010 and 2015 and will be a visiting fellow at the Berlin Social Science Research Center (WZB) in January and February 2017. His stay at NYU is supported by a travel grant from the Fritz Thyssen Foundation.

His academic interests lie in the field of public international law, in particular international dispute settlement and international courts and tribunals, the law of State responsibility, the law of treaties and international human rights, as well as German and comparative constitutional law.  Andreas is widely published in these fields, including Global Public Interest in International Investment Law (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Reassertion of Control over the Investment Treaty Regime (ed., Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in late 2016).  He is Member of the International Law Association (ILA) Study Group “Content and Evolution of the Rules of Interpretation” and reports on international investment law for the ILA Study Group “Principles of Engagement of Domestic Courts with International Law”.

In addition to his academic work, Andreas has extensive experience as counsel and advocates before international courts and tribunals. He has advised and represented sovereigns before, inter alia, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS) and arbitral tribunals established under the rules of the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID).

Center Affiliation: Institute for International Law and Justice
Research Project: The Horizontal Effect of Fundamental Rights from a Comparative Perspective

 

Nari Lee NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowNari Lee (Spring)
Senior Global Research Fellow
Korea/ Finland

Nari Lee is the professor of intellectual property at Hanken School of Economics, Finland, where she worked since 2012. She has studied law at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, Korea, and at Kyushu University, Japan, where she received master of laws (LL.M) and doctor of laws (LL.D) degrees. She also holds a postgraduate degree (Licentiate) in Business Administration and Economics from University of Vaasa, Finland and a Ph.D from University of Eastern Finland, Finland. Since 1996, she has taught and researched in the area of intellectual property in universities in Europe and in Asia. She has worked as a senior research fellow and a program director at Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition in Munich, Germany. During 2016, she will be a visiting scholar at the Faculty of Law of University of Cambridge.

Nari’s research focus is on the interaction of law and technology. She has been writing on the theory of intellectual property, innovation and patent law and particularly on the alternative governance regime to intellectual property. Her recent publications include topics on open Innovation, pharmaceutical patents, and governance of intellectual property in China and Europe.

Her research project at NYU will focus on the issue of disruptive innovation and intellectual property law with the example of 3D printing technology. She will be affiliated with the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law and Policy.

Center Affiliation: Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy
Research Project: Governing Disruptive Technologies through Intellectual Property – A Case of 3D printing

 

Monika Leszczynska NYU Law Global Research FellowMonika Leszczyńska, née Ziółkowska 
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Poland

Monika is a lawyer by training, educated both in Poland (AMU Poznan; Master in Law) and Germany (LMU Munich, LL.M. Program in European and International Business Law; University of Bonn, Ph.D. in Law). She has been a Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Collective Goods in Bonn and a member of the International Max Planck Research School “Uncertainty” since 2012. During her work at the Max Planck Institute she developed theoretical predictions based on formal economic models, designed, programmed, and conducted economics experiments as well as analyzed experimental data to answer legally motivated questions. In her research, she combines her legal education and professional experience with experimental economics approach providing evidence-based arguments to the ongoing legal debates. One example of this approach is her research on affirmative action and group dynamics where she described behavioral consequences of a gender quota rule for cooperation between group members. She also investigated experimentally the impact of two types of contracts – fixed-term and open-ended – on individual behavior showing that seemingly equivalent contract types might differently influence a contractual relationship.

Center Affiliation: Center for Law, Economics, and Organization
Research Project: Contractual Formalities and Their Behavioral Implications

 

Aoife Nolan NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowAoife Nolan (Spring)
Senior Global Research Fellow
Ireland

Professor Aoife Nolan is Professor of International Human Rights Law at the School of Law at the University of Nottingham. She co-directs the University’s Rights and Justice Research Priority Area, the world’s largest cluster of rights and justice scholars, involving over 700 members from 22 different University centres.  In November 2016, she was elected as a member of the Council of Europe's European Committee of Social Rights.  She has published extensively in the area of human rights law and is a global expert in the areas of children’s rights and economic and social rights. She was founding coordinator of the Economic and Social Rights Academic Network UK and Ireland (ESRAN-UKI) and is currently a member of the Editorial Boards of the Human Rights Law Review, the International Human Rights Law Review and the International Journal of Children's Rights. She has previously held visiting positions at institutions including Columbia University, the University of Stellenbosch, Fordham University, Queen’s University Belfast and the Université Catholique de Louvain.

In addition, she has worked with and acted as an expert advisor to a wide range of international and national bodies and organisations working on human rights issues, including a range of UN Special Procedures, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Council of Europe, a wide range of international NGOs and multiple national human rights institutions.

Her monographs include Children’s Socio-economic Rights, Democracy and the Courts (Hart, 2011), while she has edited the following collections Economic and Social Rights after the Global Financial Crisis (CUP, 2014), Human Rights and Public Finance (Hart, 2013) (with O’Connell and Harvey) and The United Nations Special Procedures System (Brill, forthcoming 2016) (with Freedman and Murphy).

Center Affiliation: Center for Human Rights and Global Justice
Research Project: Addressing the Challenges of Financial and Economic Crises: What Role for Human Rights?

 

Argyri Panezi NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowArgyri Panezi
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Greece

Argyri is a post-doctoral fellow specializing in Internet law and policy, public goods management and law and economics, and is affiliated with the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law and Policy. Her research focuses on the intersection of IP law with technology and access to knowledge. She is currently examining the impact of digitization on the future of public libraries and, specifically, their efforts to adapt to the digital era and their strategies to reach and provide access to a broader demographic.

Argyri received her LL.B. from the University of Athens and her LL.M. from Harvard Law School and is a Ph.D. candidate at the European University Institute in Florence. Her thesis examines the legal challenges for the creation of digital libraries and explores normative directions for copyright rules and exceptions currently applicable to libraries. In addition, in 2014 she was a visiting scholar at Berkeley School of Law where she explored sustainable models for creating academic digital libraries. During the course of her doctoral studies, Argyri has advised libraries on contracts and e-licenses and has also taught courses in copyright law and digital humanities. Prior to her doctoral studies she practiced competition law in a private law firm in Brussels.

Center Affiliation: Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy
Research Project: Digitization and the Future of Public Libraries

 

Zhengwen Shi NYU Law Senior Global Research FellowZhengwen Shi (Fall)
Senior Global Research Fellow
China

Zhengwen Shi is a Professor of tax law and the Director of the Center for Fiscal and Tax Law Research at China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) Law School, China. He teaches and conducts Chinese tax law, international tax law, economic law and public finance.

Zhengwen Shi received his Master's Degree from Renmin University of China Law School, and Ph.D from Peking University Law School. He has engaged in postdoctoral research work on financial economics at Renmin Uviversity in China. In his academic career, he conducts academic exchanges and visits to many countries such as, Germany, Italy, Denmark and South Korea, etc.  From July 2008 to July 2009, he has been a visiting scholar at the University of Florida Law School.

Zhengwen Shi has engaged in research work on tax legislation and tax policy at China Ministry of Finance, and currently serves as Vice President of the China Association for Fiscal and Tax Law, an Academic Committee Member of the Chinese Tax Institute, a Budget Supervision Consultant for the Beijing Municipal People's Congress, a Member of Expert Committee for legislative work of Beijing Municipal Government, the Vice President of Beijing Tax Law Construction Research Institute, a Tax Administrative Reconsideration Committee Member of Beijing Local Taxation Bureau, an Arbitrator of Guangzhou Arbitration Commission, a part-time lawyer in Beijing HuaShui Lawyers.

He is one of the leading tax law scholars in China as a core fiscal and tax legislative consultant for the Chinese National People's Congress, Ministry of Finance, and State Administration of Taxation. He has participated in the legal drafting work of General Tax Law, VAT Law, Corporate Income Tax Law, Chinese Individual Income Tax Law, Tax Collection Law, Budget Law, Environmental Tax Law, Customs Duty Law. He has also hosted and participated in more than 20 national and provincial research projects, such as, "Basic Issues in the Legislation of Chinese General Tax Law", “Comparative Study of Customs Duty Legislation”, “Study on Development Trends of International Tax Collection System”.

Zhengwen Shi has explored many areas of research, resulting in more than 30 books, including: "Tax Law Theory", (China Taxation Press, 2007), "Tax Procedure Law", (Peking University Press, 2003), "Credit-Debtor Theory of Taxation", (China University of Political Science Press, 2008). He has published more than 100 articles in core journals, including: "Righteousness Distribution and the Reform of the Individual Income Tax Law" ("China Legal Science", 2011, 5th issue), "Crack the Legal Problems of the Tax Administration Law Modification" ("Taxation Research", 2015, 8th issue), "The Statute Limitation of Tax Debt" ("Chinese Journal of Law", 2007, 4th issue). He is, at the same time, the Chief Editor of the "China Tax Law Review".

Center Affiliation: Graduate Tax Program
Research Project: Distributive Justice and Individual Income Tax Law Reform in China

 

Diheng Xu NYU Law Post-Doctoral Global FellowDiheng Xu
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
China

Diheng Xu received her Ph.D. in tax law (2016) at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. She holds Bachelor of Law, Bachelor of Economics, and Master of Economic Law from Wuhan University, China. She received scholarships for exchange studies in Australia and Austria.

Her research interests include international taxation, Chinese tax law, comparative tax law, and European tax law. Her Ph.D. research focuses on the relationship between Chinese tax incentives and subsidy rules of the World Trade Organization, with reference to State aid law in the European Union. As a global research fellow, her research project aims at figuring out interactions between China and international tax law norms. It focuses on implications derived from base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS) in the context of international tax competition.

Her recent works will be published with Intertax (forthcoming June 2016) and International Taxation in China (forthcoming 2016).

Center Affiliation: Graduate Tax Program
Research Project: China and BEPS: Interactions between China and the International Tax Norm

 

Academic Year 2015-2016

 

Sofia Amaral-Garcia
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Portugal

Sofia Amaral-Garcia is a Research Associate at DIW Berlin, Department of Firms and Markets (since September). She is also a Fellow at the Berlin Center for Consumer Policies (BCCP). Before joining DIW Berlin she was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Center for Law & Economics, ETH Zurich.

She received her Ph.D. from the European Doctorate in Law and Economics (University of Bologna, Erasmus University of Rotterdam and University of Hamburg). Her broad research interests are in empirical law and economics, applied econometrics, health economics and comparative law, with specific applications to medical malpractice, health care, judicial behavior and courts. Sofia’s research has been published in (or is forthcoming at) the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Health Policy, Health Economics, European Journal of Tort Law and Encyclopedia of Law and Economics.

She received her M.P.P.A. (Master in Public Policy and Administration) and B.A. (Licenciatura) in Economics from Nova School of Business and Economics (Portugal).

Research Project: Conflicts of interest in medicine: the interaction between physicians and pharmaceutical companies

 

Shreya Atrey
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
India

Shreya studied B.A. LL.B.(Hons.) at the NALSAR University of Law, Hyderabad, India and graduated at the top of her class in 2011. She came to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and completed the BCL with distinction in 2012. She completed her DPhil in Law in 2015 under the supervision of Prof. Sandra Fredman. Her research focused on realizing intersectionality theory into discrimination law.

At Oxford, Shreya served as the Chairperson of Oxford Pro Bono Publico, an organization of graduate law students and faculty members dedicated to the practice of public interest law on a pro bono basis. Shreya also taught on the European Human Rights Law Course. Shreya coached the University of Oxford team for the 54th Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, which was declared the U.K. National Champion in 2013. She has served as the Editor of the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal and the Editor-in-Chief of the NALSAR Student Law Review. Her research and teaching interests are in international and comparative human rights law, discrimination law, disability law, public law and feminist jurisprudence.

Research Project: Intersectional Violations: A Case of Poverty

 

Susan Emmenegger
Senior Global Research Fellow
Switzerland

Susan Emmenegger is a full professor of law and the director of the Institute of Banking Law at Bern University, Switzerland. She also serves as vice-president of the Swiss Takeover Panel.

Susan studied in Switzerland and Italy. She received a bilingual French/German law degree and a Ph.D. from Fribourg University. She holds an LL.M. from Cornell Law School, where she was a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar and an associate editor of the Cornell International Law Journal. She has been a visiting scholar at Berkeley Law School, Paris IV, the MPI for Foreign and International Private law in Hamburg and the European University Institute in Florence, as well as an adjunct professor at Cornell Law School.

Susan's research focus is on contract law, legal methodology and financial markets law. She is the co-author of a standard textbook on Swiss contract law, of a treatise on legal methodology and the author of a widely noted book on the internal governance of banks. She has written extensively on various aspects of contractual and regulatory aspects of banking law. She is the editor of a book series on banking law and co-editor of the Swiss Financial Markets Review. She is also a member of a joint government/industry council which advises the Swiss government on financial market strategy issues and a member of the academic council of the Max-Planck-Institute of Foreign and International Private Law.

Her research project at NYU will focus on the issue of conflicting national laws in the context of international financial regulation, including the question of extraterritoriality. Susan will be affiliated with the Center for Financial Institutions and the Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement.

Research Project: Conflicting Laws in International Financial Regulation

 

Jennifer Hill
Senior Global Research Fellow
Australia

Jennifer Hill is Professor of Corporate Law and co-director of the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law at University of Sydney Law School, Australia. Jennifer writes in the fields of comparative corporate law and governance. A graduate of the University of Sydney and Oxford University, she has previously been a Visiting Professor at several US law schools, including Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University of Texas and Cornell,. In July-August 2015 will be a Herbert Smith Freehills Visitor at the University of Cambridge, England.

Jennifer is a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI) and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law (AAL). She is a member of several Editorial Boards, including the corporations law editorial board of Cambridge University Press. She has also served on committees involving corporate law reform and policy, such as the Law Council of Australia, Corporations Law Committee; the Corporations and Markets Advisory Committee (CAMAC); and is a member of the External Advisory Panel to the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC).

Jennifer’s research has explored many aspects of corporate law and governance from a theoretical and comparative perspective. Her recent research includes a co-authored book (with E. Ferran, N. Moloney, J.C. Coffee, Jr.), entitled The Regulatory Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and a co-edited book (with R.S. Thomas), entitled Research Handbook on Shareholder Power (Edward Elgar, 2015).

Research Project: International Regulatory Governance and Structures in the Post-Crisis Era

 

Asem Khalil
Global Research Fellow
Palestine

Asem Khalil is an Associate Professor of Public Law, H.H. Shaikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani Chair in Constitutional and International Law, Birzeit University. Dr. Khalil is the former Dean of the Faculty of Law and Public Administration (2012-2015), and of the Ibrahim Abu-Lughod Institute of International Studies (2010-2012). Dr. Khalil holds a Ph.D. in Public Law, Fribourg University, Switzerland, a Master in Public Administration from the National School of Administration, France, and a doctorate in Utriusque Juris, Lateran University, Italy. His latest publications includes: “Palestinians to Citizens: Is Citizenship a Solution to the Palestinian Refugee Problem?” (Middle East Law and Governance), “Beyond the Written Constitution: Constitutional Crisis of, and the Institutional Deadlock in, the Palestinian Political System as Entrenched in the Basic Law” (International Journal of Constitutional Law), “Socioeconomic Rights of Palestinian Refugees in Arab Countries (International Journal of Refugee Law), “From Constitutions to Constitutionalism in Arab States: Beyond Paradox to Opportunity” (Transnational Legal Theory). Dr. Khalil is also the author of several chapters in books published by well-known academic publishers including Palgrave, Oxford University Press, I.B. Tauris, L'Harmattan, and Cameron May Ltd.

Research Project: Arab Political Systems in Crisis: Alternative Approaches to a Better Understanding of the Dynamics of Arab Regimes

 

Fabio Morosini
Global Research Fellow
Brazil

Fabio Morosini is a law professor at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, where he directs the Center for Law, Globalization and Development, and teaches and conducts research on international trade; international investment; and methods in law. In addition to teaching full time, Prof. Morosini has been appointed as a Researcher of the National Council of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, Ministry of Science and Technology, Brazil) to lead a research project on South-South trade and investment relations.

Dr. Morosini was a Research Fellow at the World Trade Organization (2009-2010). He holds a Ph.D in Latin American Studies and an LL.M. from the University of Texas at Austin; a Masters, with honors, in law and economic globalization from the University of Paris 1/ Institute of Political Studies of Paris; and a Bachelor of Law degree from the Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul. His Ph.D thesis was on the topic “The MERCOSUR and WTO Retreaded Tires Dispute: Rehabilitating Regulatory Competition in International Trade and Environmental Regulation”. His current research agenda explores the legal tools that Brazil undertakes, both at the international and national levels, to implement its own development policies on trade and investment matters.

He is widely published in his areas of research, including: The Brazilian Approach to Its South-South Trade and Investment Relations: The Case of Angola, FGV Direito SP Research Paper Series n. 114. Available at SSRN: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2532584 (2014) (co-authored with Michelle Ratton Sanchez Badin); The Status of Sustainable Development in the Law of the World Trade Organization, in ARBITRAGEM E COMÉRCIO INTERNACIONAL: ESTUDOS EM HOMENAGEM A LUIZ OLAVO, 529 (Umberto Celli Júnior, Maristela Basso & Alberto do Amaral Júnior eds., 2013) (co-authored with Gabrielle Marceau); Trade and Climate Change: Unveiling the Principle of Common but Differentiated Responsibilities from the WTO Agreements, 42:4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL LAW REVIEW, 713 (2010); The MERCOSUR Trade and Environment Linkage Debate: The Disputes over Trade in Retreaded Tires, 44:5 JOURNAL OF WORLD TRADE, 1127 (2010). His full CV is available in both English and Portuguese at: http://lattes.cnpq.br/3545195769262482. Email: fabio.morosini@ufrgs.br

Research Project: Putting South-South Trade & Investment Regulations Into Context: The Case of Brazil and Angola

 

Machie Murata
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Japan

Machie Murata is a Japanese lawyer and the Head of Legal Affairs for the Office of Society-Academia Collaboration for Innovation (SACI) at Kyoto University.  The mission of the SACI is to promote knowledge and technology transfer for leading innovation.  Machie manages the Legal Affairs Department of the SACI, supervises legal practices in technology transfer including patent-related issues and seed fund management for startups, and researches legal and practical issues related to this field.

Machie obtained her LL.B. degree in 2001 from the Faculty of Law at Doshisha University and passed the Japanese bar exam in the same year.  She was a legal apprentice at the Legal Training and Research Institute of the Supreme Court of Japan from 2002-2003, worked for a law firm in Osaka as an attorney from 2004-2006, and thereafter joined Kyoto University as an in-house counsel.  Machie is a trailblazer.  She is the first in-house counsel for a Japanese university working exclusively in the legal field of technology transfer.  She has built a career as one of the first Japanese attorneys to specialize in this field.  Through her strong leadership, her legal team has become very well recognized as an excellent professional team in the Japanese technology transfer field.

Machie is currently interested in creating a model environment for successfully supporting startups that is suited for Japan.  One of the difficulties with university technology transfer is the gap between the universities’ researches and the technologies sought by businesses.  She believes forming startups is one of the most effective ways to bridge this gap.  Her research at NYU School of Law will be focused on an investigation and analysis of the models being used for university startups in the United States. She would like to utilize the research results to create a model environment suited for startups in Japan by considering the differences between the United States and Japanese culture and society.

Research Project: The Key Factors and Issues, and Professional Supports for University Startups to Achieve Innovation

 

Yoon Jin Shin
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Korea, Republic of (South)

Yoon Jin Shin received her J.S.D. (2015) and LL.M. (2011) degrees at Yale Law School. Her doctoral dissertation critically investigated the nature of the current global legal regime directed to combat human trafficking, illuminated its negative impact on the individuals, and suggested an alternative approach to effectively address the issue as a transnational human rights problem. Her dissertation won the Ambrose Gherini Prize at Yale Law School for the best student writing in international law in 2014-15. Before coming to Yale, Yoon Jin was a judge in South Korea, mainly in criminal courts, including a special division for sexual violence. She was awarded a Stepping Stone Prize from the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center for the best court decision for women’s rights in 2009.

After leaving court in February 2010, she served as a Fellow in Gonggam—Korean Public Interest Lawyers’ Group, working on a pro bono basis for human rights cases. In 2011, she participated in the 49th session of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, as a Korean NGO delegate, documenting the English version of the Shadow Report and making a presentation on behalf of the delegate. While studying in Seoul National University, where she graduated from with summa cum laude, Yoon Jin worked with various human rights and public interest organizations, engaging in numerous research and advocacy projects aiming to empower disadvantaged groups in society. Yoon Jin holds a certificate from the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in Korea as a counselor for survivors of sexual violence, and won Human Rights Thesis Award from the National Human Rights Commission of Korea in 2002 for a thesis on the labor rights of people with disabilities. She is a member of New York Bar Association and MINBYUN—Lawyers for a Democratic Society in Korea.

Her areas of interest include international law, constitutional law, transnational law, and human rights. Her recent publications include “Human Trafficking and Labor Migration: The Dichotomous Law and Complex Realities of Filipina Entertainers in South Korea and Suggestions for Integrated and Contextualized Legal Responses” in the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law (forthcoming Spring 2015).

Research Project: Global Constitutionalism, Transnational Human Rights Law and the Constitutional Rights Practice of South Korea

 

Jing Tao
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
China

Jing Tao (陶靖) specializes in international relations, international law, China’s foreign policy, and East Asian security. During the 2015-2016 fellowship period, she works on a book manuscript entitled “Sovereignty Costs and China’s Socialization into International Legal Regimes: Evidence from Hard Law”. This project develops from her dissertation, and uses different types of “hard laws” with legalized dispute settlement mechanisms to examine the depth of China’s socialization in international legal regimes and the changes and continuities of China’s approach to state sovereignty. Meanwhile, she starts to work on a new project, examining how international law influences China’s strategies of managing maritime disputes and the dynamics of interactions among Asian states regarding those disputes in East and South China Seas.

She holds double B.A. degrees in International Relations and Economics, an M.A. degree in International Relations from Peking University, and a Ph.D. degree in Political Science from Cornell University. She was a post-doctoral research associate in the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program at Princeton University in 2014-2105.

Her recent works will be forthcoming in the Journal of Contemporary China (2015), and in an edited book volume, China's Socialist Rule of Law Reforms Under Xi Jinping, published by Routledge (2016). 

Research Project: Better Now than Later: The "Effective Control" Doctrine and China’s Assertiveness in Maritime Disputes

 

Frederick Wilmot-Smith
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
United Kingdom

Fred is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He read law at the University of Cambridge as an undergraduate and studied for his graduate degrees, including a doctorate, at the University of Oxford. He was awarded the Vinerian Scholarship, for the best performance in the year, on the Bachelor of Civil Law, a master's degree in the common law.

His research interests to date have included private law and its philosophical foundations. He is writing a book on benefit-based obligations, which are important in numerous legal and political debates. As a Global Fellow, he will examine the theoretical foundations of legal systems as a whole and the normative implications these have for important contemporary policy questions, such as whether the State should subsidize its citizens’ use of the legal system.

His work has appeared in a number of academic journals and books; he co-edits a series on defenses in private law and has written for the London Review of Books. 

Research Project: Legal Aid: A Philosophical Inquiry

 

Academic Year 2014-2015

 

Remo Caponi
Senior Global Research Fellow
Italy

Remo is full professor of civil procedure at the University of Florence, School of Law. His predecessor in this chair was among others Mauro Cappelletti. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the European Law Institute (ELI), the Council of the International Association of Procedural Law (IAPL), the Board of Trustees of the Academy of European Law, the Board of Directors of the Italian Association of Civil Procedure.

Remo holds a JD from the University of Florence and a PhD in civil procedure from the University of Bologna. He is a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Heidelberg and a DAAD research fellow at the Humboldt University Berlin. He has been the reporter for Italy, Spain, Portugal and Slovenia in the Study for the European Parliament on the public policy exception and a co-reporter in the Study for the European Commission on insolvency proceedings.

Remo has published several books and about two hundred papers in Italian, English and German language in the field of civil procedure (domestic and transnational), comparative civil procedure and constitutional law. He often has been a speaker at international conferences and workshops (among others in Berlin, Kyoto, São Paulo, Heidelberg, Budapest, Valparaiso, Santiago de Chile, Athens, Madrid, Dresden, Curitiba, Porto Alegre, Izmir).

After dealing widely with “classic” topics of civil procedure (res judicata, structure of proceedings, interplay between judicial powers and the powers of parties, role of Supreme Courts, provisional measures), Remo has been broadening his interests to the constitutional settings of administration of justice, the dialogue between national and international courts, the European law of civil procedure, the fair trial guarantee in transnational litigation.

Remo will be affiliated for the whole academic year 2014-2015 with the Center on Civil Justice at the NYU Law School (http://www.law.nyu.edu/centers/civiljustice). Email rc3161@nyu.edu. His research project focuses on the interplay between specific aspects of civil procedure and the whole judicial system, as well as the relationship between legal system and ethical and cultural dimensions affecting citizens and professionals involved in the machinery of justice.

Research Project: Just about Dispute Resolution?

 

Daniel Fitzpatrick
Senior Global Research Fellow
Australia

Professor Fitzpatrick writes on property rights in a development context. In 2007 he won the Hart Article Prize from the UK Socio-Legal Association for an article entitled: Evolution and Chaos in Property Rights Systems: The Third World Tragedy of Contested Access. He has published in the Yale Law Journal, Law and Society Review, the Yale Journal of International Law, and Law and Social Inquiry. He has been a Global Visiting Professor at New York University School of Law (2011), a Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore (2006-09); a Visiting Professor at the University of Muenster (2002); and a Distinguished Visitor at the University of Toronto (2007). Currently he is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow (2012-2016) [The Resilience of Property: Inundation, Displacement and Local Relocation in the Asia-Pacific].

Professor Fitzpatrick has extensive experience in the public policy of property rights and development. He was the UN's land rights adviser in post-conflict East Timor (2000) and post-tsunami Aceh (2005-6). He is the primary author of the UN's Land and Disasters: Guidance for Practitioners (2010). He has undertaken professional consultancies on law and development with the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, Oxfam International, the OECD, UNDP and UN-Habitat. In 2011 he established the Law, Governance and Development Initiative at the Australian National University.

Research Project: Getting to Coase:  Equilibrium and the Institution of Property

 

Ida Koivisto
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Finland

Dr. Ida Koivisto is a post-doctoral researcher from University of Helsinki, Finland. She is also a member of both The Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights and The Centre of Excellence in the Foundations of European Law and Polity Research in University of Helsinki. Recently, she has worked as the coordinator of Finnish nation-wide doctoral program. In the past, she has been a visiting researcher in European University Institute, Florence.

Ida’s doctoral dissertation (Faculty of Law, Uni. Helsinki 2011) discusses the many discourses of good governance. The main argument of the study is that the linguistic open-endedness as well as the strategic use of the words “good” and “governance” make the concept radically indeterminate. As such, it can be plausibly used for multiple ideological purposes. Relatedly, the study critically examines the normative pull of legal rationality.

Ida’s research interests cover public law, especially administrative law, international public law, socio-legal studies, legal theory and philosophy. At most general, she is interested in the interconnections of law and other normative systems in society. As a Global Fellow her research project delves into the debate on global administrative law. She approaches it as a matrix of the ideal of transparency, combining critical legal scholarship and contemporary philosophy.

Research project: Regulating Visibility - Transparency as an Ideal in Global Administrative Law

 

Michelle Miao
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
China/UK

Michelle Miao has recently completed her Howard League post-doctoral fellow at Oxford University’s Centre for Criminology. During the fellowship, she studied the contradiction between European human rights influences and a rising trend of penal populism in the context of British penal politics. She completed her DPhil in Law at the University of Oxford in 2013 and is currently converting her doctoral thesis The Politics of Change: Explaining Capital Punishment Reform in China into a book.

Her thesis presents material from one of the first empirical studies on China’s recent death penalty reform under the influences of international human rights law. The core empirical component of the thesis was a series of elite interviews with penal professionals at national and lower levels in China, including judges, prosecutors, and legislators, who are proximate to the sources of information held by state authorities, or closely involved in the day-to-day administration of capital punishment. The research first explained the limited success of the international intervention in China’s death penalty reform. It went further to identify three interrelated domestic forces - rising penal populism, the overt politicisation of penal process, and entrenched localism in the use of penal power- as an explanation of why and how the Europe-induced changes has been constrained by local conditions. The thesis has important policy implications for reform-minded policy makers, abolitionist activists, and human rights advocates in China and worldwide.

Michelle holds two Masters Degrees, one from Renmin University of China Law School and the other from New York University Law School. Her research interests are the intersections between the domains of criminology, human rights, socio-legal studies and international law. As a postdoc fellow of the Centre for Research in Crime & Justice, Michelle’s research project at NYU will examine the connection between the abolition of the death penalty and the rise of Life without the Possibility of Parole as an alternative.

Research Project: Moving towards Lengthy Life Imprisonment? A Comparative Study on the Alternative Sanctions to the Death Penalty in the United States and China

 

André Nollkaemper
Senior Global Research Fellow
Netherlands

André Nollkaemper is Professor of Public International Law of the University of Amsterdam. Since May 2011 he also is (external) Advisor to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. He is President of the European Society of International Law, member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences of the Netherlands, and member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration.

In 1999, he established the Amsterdam Center for International Law (ACIL), which he directed until 2009. His practical experience includes cases before the European Court on Human Rights, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, courts of the Netherlands and consultancy for a variety of international and national organisations.

André Nollkaemper published widely in the areas of general international law, international responsibility, the relations between international and national law, and international environmental law.

Research Project: Shared Responsibility in International Law

 

Luigi Nuzzo
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Luigi is professor of Legal History and History of International Law at the Law Faculty of the University of Salento (Lecce, Italy). After graduating in Law at the University of Pavia, he held a PhD in History of Medieval and Modern Law from the University of Siena. Several times research grant holder at the Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte (Frankfurt am Main), he carried out research at the Universities of Barcelona, Seville, Madrid and Mexico City. He was a Senior Robbins Research Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley (2007; 2012) and a Alexander von HumboldtForschungsstipendiat (2008; 2010; 2013). He is a member of the Instituto Internacional de Derecho Indiano(Buenos Aires) and of the editorial board of the Journal of History of International Law (Heidelberg) and Storica(Rome).

He published extensively in Italian as well as in English, German and Spanish, about the history of international law, the colonial law, the Spanish Indies (XVIth -XVIIth centuries) and the German and Italian legal culture between the XIXth and XX century. His recent books are: Origini di una Scienza. Diritto internazionale e colonialismo nel XIX secolo, Frankfurt/Main, Klostermann, 2012; Constructing International Law. The Birth of a Discipline, (with Milos Vec), Frankfurt/Main, Klostermann, 2012.

He is currently undertaking a comparative study of the Western concessions in Tianjin between 1900 and 1945, particularly focusing on the strategies of colonial governance and on the role played by law in the production process of a new social space and new subjectivity in China.

Research Project: Space, Time and Law in a Colonial City: Tianjin 1900-1945

 

Yukio Okitsu
Global Research Fellow
Japan

Yukio Okitsu is an associate professor of law at Kobe University, where he has been teaching courses on administrative law, French law, and European law. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Paris 13 Nord.

His primary research subjects have been judicial review and administrative litigation systems. A book of his has been published in Japanese based on his master’s thesis work which examined the effects of judicial judgments on administrative agencies in Japan, France, and Germany. He has also been conducting a comparative study on French administrative law and has written articles both in Japanese and in French.

Yukio has also been focusing on European law, especially the relationship and interaction between the legal orders of the EU, the ECHR, and their Member States. He coedited an anthology on this topic and contributed an article to it on the famous case of the European Court of Human Rights “Kress v. France” of 2001, which is also available in English (Yukio Okitsu, European Convention on Human Rights and French Administrative Justice: A Case Study on the Dialogue between National and Supranational Legal Orders, 47 Kobe U. L. Rev. 15 (2013)). Recently, he has turned his attention to global administrative law. During his residency at NYU he plans to develop his research on this subject, especially seeking to explain why and how the rules and principles of administrative law apply beyond the jurisdictional boundaries of domestic legal systems.

He holds an LLB (2000) and an LLM (2002) from the University of Tokyo and a master’s degree in internal public law (2005) from the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas, where he studied as a recipient of the French Government Scholarship (Boursier du gouvernement français). View his full CV.

Research Project: The Normative Foundations for the Existence of Administrative Law in a Supranational Context

 

Zoran Oklopcic
Global Research Fellow
Canada

Dr. Zoran Oklopcic is Associate Professor at Carleton University's Department of Law and Legal Studies. In the past, he was MacCormick Visiting Fellow at the Edinburgh Law School, as well as a Visiting Scholar at the University of Pompeu Fabra Department of Political Science. He holds an LLM from the Central European University, and earned his SJD from the University of Toronto Faculty of Law.

Dr. Oklopcic has published in the areas of constitutional theory, comparative constitutional law and public international law. His work on constituent power, self-determination, secession and constitutional pluralism has appeared in journals such as ConstellationsLeiden Journal of International LawCanadian Journal of Law and JurisprudenceGlobal Constitutionalism and Transnational Legal Theory.

His current research focuses on the mutation of self-determination discourse in Catalonia, as well as on the ‘duty to negotiate federalization’ as a potential component in early-conflict constitution makingHe also works on a larger book project, tentatively called "After the People: Provincializing Constitutional Theory."

Research Project: Lilliputian Travels: Constitutional Imaginary, Democratic Theory and the Asymmetric Cross-Border Political Participation

 

Friedrich Rosenfeld
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Germany

Dr. Friedrich Rosenfeld is a German attorney specializing in arbitration and public international law. He acts as counsel, expert witness and arbitrator.

Friedrich is also Visiting Professor at the International Hellenic University of Thessaloniki and lecturer for investment arbitration at the University of Hamburg and at Bucerius Law School.

Prior to joining his current firm, he worked as consultant for the United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials in Cambodia. Friedrich holds a doctoral degree summa cum laude. He studied at Bucerius Law School in Hamburg and Columbia Law School in New York.

Research Project: Bridging the Gap Between Investment and Commercial Arbitration at the Enforcement Stage

 

Yaniv Roznai
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Israel

Yaniv Roznai completed his PhD at the Department of Law, The London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) in 2014. His thesis is entitled: ‘Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendments: A Study of The Nature and Limits of Constitutional Amendment Powers’. He holds an LL.M from LSE (Distinction) in international law and LLB and BA degrees in Law and Government from the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel (Magna cum Laude). In 2013, he was a visiting student research collaborator at the Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA), Princeton University.

In 2014, Yaniv was awarded the thesis prize of the European Group of Public Law (EGPL), which is awarded on an annual basis to the best doctoral public law thesis characterized by its European dimension. He is also the winner of the 2013-2012 Modern Law Review Scholarship, 2010-2013 LSE PhD Scholarship; 2010 California Bar International Law Section Annual Student Writing Competition, and 2006 IDC Annual Student Paper Competition. Prior to coming to NYU he has worked as a researcher at the Minerva Center for the Rule of Law under Extreme Conditions, the University of Haifa; as a lecturer of comparative legal systems at Bar-Ilan University and of constitutional law at Carmel Academic College, and as a teaching and research assistant in the areas of constitutional and international law. He also served as an intern and a legal assistant in the Knesset’s (Israeli Parliament) legal department. Yaniv is a member of the Israeli Bar, the Israeli Public Law Association and the International Society of Public Law.

Yaniv’s scholarship focuses on constitutional and international law. He has written on a variety of subjects, including comparative constitutional law, constitutional theory, the relationship between international and constitutional law, international law of armed conflict, international human rights law, and legislation. His articles can be accessedhere. Yaniv has presented his work in numerous universities such as Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Cornell, Indiana, Washington University St. Louis, Queen Mary University of London, LSE, and Edinburgh. His publications appeared in journals such as the American Journal of Comparative LawInternational & Comparative Law Quarterly;International Journal of Constitutional LawTheory and Practice of LegislationVienna Journal on International Constitutional LawWisconsin International Law JournalSouthern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal,The International Human Rights Law ReviewHuman Rights & Globalization Law ReviewThe California International Law JournalIsraeli Bar Assoc. Law ReviewIDC Law ReviewPublic LawThe Modern Law Review, and Stanford Law & Policy Review.

Research Project: We the Limited People? The Nature & Scope of Constitution-Making Powers

 

Mario Schapiro
Global Research Fellow
Brazil

Mario Schapiro is a full-time professor of Law at Getulio Vargas Foundation Law School. He graduated in law from University of São Paulo, Faculty of Law, where he also obtained a master and a doctoral degree in economic law. He was research fellow of Sasakawa Young Leaders Fund (Master Program), visiting researcher at Columbia Law School (PhD program), and visiting scholar at Brazil Institute at King's College, London. Between 2012 and 2013 he was research fellow at IPEA (Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research), when he developed an institutional analysis of Brazilian industrial policy. His research agenda is focused on law and development, administrative law and political economy of economic development, having particular interest on institutional alternatives and policy design in the economic field. He teaches Law & Development, Administrative Law, Competition Law, and Institutions of Development Finance.

Research Project: Combining Development and Democracy in State Financial Institutions: Delegation, Accountability, and Implications for the Brazilian Case

 

Yvonne Tew
Post-Doctoral Global Fellow
Malaysia/US

Dr. Yvonne Tew’s primary research and teaching interests are in constitutional law, comparative public and private law, family law, contracts, and law and religion. Prior to joining NYU as a Hauser Global Fellow, Yvonne taught at Columbia Law School, where she was an Associate-in-Law, Postdoctoral Research Scholar and Lecturer-in-Law. She received her PhD in constitutional law from the University of Cambridge where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. In 2012, she was awarded the Distinction in Research Prize in the Arts and Humanities by St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge, for her scholarship. While at the University of Cambridge, Yvonne served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Cambridge Student Law Review.

Yvonne received her first law degree at the University of Cambridge, where she consistently placed in the top 5% of her class each year and graduated with Double First Class Honors. She then completed her Master of Laws (LLM) from Harvard Law School after winning the Cambridge-Harvard Law Link Benefited Place Award for the top two final-year law graduates from the University of Cambridge admitted to the Harvard Law School LLM program. After graduating from Harvard, she worked as an attaché at the Permanent Mission of Malaysia to the United Nations in New York. Yvonne has also taught constitutional law at the University of Cambridge as a supervisor and is admitted to the bar in New York.

Yvonne’s publications include “Originalism at Home and Abroad” 52 Columbia Journal of Transnational Law 780 (2014); “And They Call It Puppy Love: Young Love, Forced Marriage, and Immigration Rules”, 71(1) Cambridge Law Journal 18 (2012) and “No Longer a Privileged Few: Expense Claims, Prosecution, and Parliamentary Privilege”, 70(2) Cambridge Law Journal 282 (2011). Her book, “The Constitutional Core: Constitutional Adjudication in Southeast Asia,” is forthcoming with the Oxford University Press in 2015.

Research Project: Arbitrating God

 

Marlon Weichert
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Brazil

Marlon A. Weichert has been a federal prosecutor in Brazil for 19 years, primarily dedicated to human rights litigation and advocacy. During the past 14 years he has worked a variety of areas to advance the adoption of transitional justice measures in Brazil. He has headed the program to search and identify the remains of victims of dictatorship-era crimes and actively participated in discussions concerning the right to truth about human rights violations during this period. He was the first scholar and prosecutor in Brazil to publicly argue that the Amnesty Law of 1979that prevents perpetrators of human rights violations from being held accountable in the country - was contrary to international law. Since 2008 he has lead and coordinated the investigation and persecution of several cases involving such types of crimes. He has also been involved in memory recovery projects, including the development of the Brazil Never Again Digital projecta website that hosts a collection of around 850,000 digitalized documents pertaining to judicial processes initiated against victims of political repression during the Brazilian dictatorshipand the creation of sites of conscience.

In 2013, Weichert was invited by the Brazilian Minister of Justice to join a commission responsible for granting reparations to victims of political persecution, the so-called Amnesty Commission. He has also been requested to provide expert testimony before both the Inter-American Human Rights Commission (2008) and the Inter-American Human Rights Court (2010). In parallel to his work for the Public Ministry, Weichert has been frequently invited to lecture on human rights issues in different academic venues and has a vast set of publications on these subjects.

His research at NYU will focus on the role that institutional reform, within a transitional justice framework, can play in societies thateven after re-democratizationhave failed to curb state violence.

Research Project: The Role of Institutional Reform in Transitional Justice and the Obstacles for its Development

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Academic Year 2013-2014

 

George AndersonGeorge Anderson
Senior Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Canada

George R.M. Anderson, was a civil servant in the Canadian government, with senior appointments in the Energy, Finance, Foreign Affairs and Finance departments before becoming Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (1996-2002) and Natural Resources (2002-2005). He was President of the Forum of Federations, an international NGO supported by nine countries, 2005-2011.  He served as an expert member of the stand-by team of the Mediation Support Unit, United Nations in 2012-13 and continues to work with the UN on the constitutional transition in Yemen.  He has worked or lectured in over 25 countries.  Educated at Queen’s and Oxford and the École Nationale d’Administration in Paris.  Fellow at Harvard's Center for International Affairs (1992-93).  A mentor, Trudeau Foundation, 2011.   Author of Federalism: An Introduction (OUP 2008) and Fiscal Federalism: An Introduction (OUP 2010), which have been translated into 22 and 12 languages respectively.  Editor of Oil and Gas in Federal Systems and Internal Markets and Multilevel Governance (both OUP 2012) and co-editor of Federal Rivers(Edward Elgar, 2013). Vice-Chair, Board of Trustuees, Queen’s University. Member, Advisory Committee, Mowat Centre, University of Toronto.

Research Project: Dealing with Territorial Cleavages in Constitutional Transitions

 

Alessandro Fabbi
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Dr. Alessandro Fabbi is a lawyer specializing in civil procedure law and a teaching assistant, at several institutions, in the same discipline.

Alessandro’s areas of research and professional interests are international and comparative civil procedure, domestic and international arbitration, complex litigation, access to justice, public law disputes, harmonization of law and procedural law before international courts and tribunals.
He holds a JD in law from the La Sapienza University, a Master’s degree in international relations from the Italian Society for the International Organization and a PhD in arbitration law from the LUISS Guido Carli University, where he recently defended his PhD thesis on “Evidence in International Arbitration”.
In the past, Alessandro has also been educated in Luxembourg, Germany, Spain and the UK and received awards by the Fondazione Sapienza, the Confindustria and the Rome Bar Association, where he is a current member of the Young Bar Conference.
Having previously clerked with the Italian General State Attorneys, Alessandro has worked with domestic and international law firms, both in Rome and in London, and acted as a consultant with an Italian important trade association.

During his residency at NYU Law School he will focus on the topic of procedural agreements in the US system and in a comparative perspective.

Research Project: "Privatizing" Civil Justice Through Procedural Agreements? A Comparative Law Analysis

 

Susy Frankel
Senior Global Research Fellow
Fulbright Senior Scholar
New Zealand

Susy is Professor of Law and Director of the New Zealand Centre of International Economic Law, at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She is also Chair of the Copyright Tribunal (NZ). She has been a visiting Professor at the University of Iowa, University of Western Ontario and Fellow of Clare Hall and visitor to the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge (UK). She is a member of the Executive Committee of Association for the Advancement of Teaching and Research in Intellectual Property (ATRIP) and of the editorial boards of Journal of World Intellectual Property, Queen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property and the University of Western Australia Law Review. She has published widely on the nexus between international intellectual property and trade law, and particularly focusing on international treaty interpretation and the protection of traditional knowledge. Her books include Intellectual Property in New Zealand (LexisNexis 2011), with Peter Drahos Indigenous Peoples Innovation: Intellectual Property Pathways to Development (ANU epress, 2012; with Meredith Kolsky Lewis International Economic Law and National Autonomy (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Susy’s research expertise extends to regulatory theory and particularly the impacts of international trade of regulatory autonomy over knowledge assets and innovation. She was Project Leader of the New Zealand Law Foundation Regulatory Reform Project (funded to NZ$2million) from 2011-2013. That project’s publications include two books Susy Frankel (ed)  Learning from the Past, Adapting for the Future: Regulatory Reform in New Zealand (Lexis Nexis, 2011) and Recalibrating Behaviour: Smarter Regulation in a Global World (Lexis Nexis 2013).

Susy holds an appointment as a Neutral for the World Intellectual Property Organization Arbitration and Mediation Centre, Geneva, Switzerland. She has previously been an Assistant Commissioner of Trade Marks, Patents and Designs for the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand, 1998-2006. In that capacity she acted as an independent Hearings Officer, mostly relating to trade mark oppositions. She was specialist intellectual property adviser to the Waitangi Tribunal on the claim brought against the New Zealand  government by Maori about the protection of traditional knowledge and Maori intellectual property.  Susy qualified as Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand in 1988 and as a Solicitor of England & Wales in 1991 and has practised law in both jurisdictions.

Research Project: Supporting Intellectual Property's Innovation and Creativity Goals through Dynamic
Interpretation of International Agreements

 

Barbara Lauriat
Global Research Fellow
United Kingdom

Dr. Barbara Lauriat is a Lecturer in Law (Assistant Professor) at King’s College London. Previously, she was the Career Development Fellow in Intellectual Property Law at the University of Oxford and a Fellow by Special Election of St. Catherine’s College, Oxford. She holds a BA and JD from Boston University, where she served as an editor on the Boston University Law Review, and a DPhil from the University of Oxford, where she was the General Editor (Editor-in-Chief) of the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal

Dr Lauriat’s research is broadly concerned with intellectual property, and particularly the history of copyright. Her doctoral thesis was on the subject of the 1878 Royal Commission on Copyright. In her legal historical research, she aims to employ less traditional legal methods and sources, such as biography, personal correspondence, journalism, royal commissions and executive committees, and literature. Currently, Dr. Lauriat’s research focuses on the relationship between theories of copyright and political ideologies. In addition to her academic work, she occasionally publishes journalistic articles and limericks.

Research Project: Copyright, Left, and Center: Studies of Anglo-American Copyright in a Political Context

 

Faina Milman-Sivan
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Faina Milman-Sivan is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Haifa, where she teaches courses on Labor Law, International Labor Law, and Freedom of Association. She holds an LLM (summa cum laude) and JSD from Columbia University Faculty of Law. She articled at the Israeli Supreme Court, with the former Chief Justice, Dorit Beinisch, and is a member of both the New York and Israeli Bar. Milman-Sivan is also a Board Member of the Israeli Society for Labour Law and Social Security and the Israeli Branch of the International Society of Labour and Social Security. She was a guest co-editor (with Yossi Dahan) of the “Labor Rights in the Era of Globalization" Special Issue of Law & Ethics of Human Rights.
 
Her research and publications focus on critical analysis of the international labor regime, global justice and global governance theories and international labor, and the International Labour Organization. Other areas of interest include collective bargaining, and prisoners’ labor rights. Recent publications include: Faina Milman-Sivan, Prisoners for Hire: Towards a Normative Justification of the ILO’s Prohibition of Private Forced Prisoner Labor, FORDHAM INT’L L. J., 37 (forthcoming, 2013); Yossi Dahan, Hanna Lerner & Faina Milman-Sivan, Shared Responsibility and the International Labor Organization, MICH. J. INT’L L. 43 (forthcoming 2013). Together with Dahan and Lerner she is currently editing a book entitled GLOBAL JUSTICE AND INTERNATIONAL LABOR LAW. Milman-Sivan is a recipient of several prestigious research grants, including from the Israeli Science Foundation (ISF) and the German-Israeli Foundation (Young).

Research Project: Shared Responsibility, Global Justice, and the Representation Structure and Norms of
the International Labor Organization (ILO)

 

Graeme Orr
Senior Global Research Fellow
Australia

Graeme Orr is a Professor of Law at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.  The law of politics, in particular electoral law, is his primary expertise.  In that field he is author of The Law of Politics (2010, Federation Press), co-editor of Realising Democracy (2003) and Electoral Democracy: Australian Prospects (2011) and International Editor of the Election Law Journal; his doctoral work concerned the common law history and regulation of electoral bribery.  As a Global Fellow, Graeme’s focus will be a monograph on ritual and rhythm in electoral regulation.   The Australian Research Council is also currently funding a project Graeme is co-ordinating with Dr Ron Levy, on deliberative approaches to the law of democracy. This project includes a symposium run through NYU in April 2013, and a monograph for Routledge.     

Graeme has also published extensively in labour law, the law of negligence and on issues of language and law.  He is on the editorial board of the Australian Journal of Labour Law, and was formerly managing editor of the Griffith Law Review, ‘sport and the law’ columnist with the Alternative Law Journal, and employment law columnist for the Australian Journal of Administrative Law.  Prior to becoming an academic, Graeme clerked for Justices Spender and Beaumont of the Federal Court of Australia, and is admitted as a solicitor of the Queensland Supreme Court.

In 2011 Graeme won the Law School Teacher Award (UQ).  In recent years he has also been Australian correspondent for the 255 year old The Annual Register: A Record of World Events.

Research Project: Ritual and Rhythm in Electoral Systems

 

Sagi Peari
Global Research Fellow
Canada

Sagi Peari is in the final stages of completing his SJD at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He received his LL.B. from Tel Aviv University and his LLM also from the University of Toronto.  Sagi’s research is on two interconnected (in his view) areas. First, he has a strong interest in private law and the private law categories: tort, contracts, property and restitution. Secondly, he works in the area of conflict of laws. His doctoral dissertation titled: ‘The Choice-Based Perspective of Choice-of-Law’ provides the conjunction of the two: it applies some theoretical dimensions of private law theory to conflict of laws.

Sagi is a holder of the prestigious Canadian Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS doctoral fellowship. His articles have been accepted for publication in a wide variety of legal journals: the University of Toronto Law Journal; the Canadian Journal of Law & Jurisprudence; the Melbourne Journal of International Law, the Netherland Journal of Private International Law, and the Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law. He has presented his work at conferences in Canada (Osgoode Hall Law School & McMaster University), the UK (King’s College London) and the USA (Duke Law School & Yale Law School). Sagi is also a winner of the 2012 American Society of International Law Prize for the best article on conflict of laws.

Research Project: What’s Wrong with the Better Law Approach?

 

Theresa Reinold
Global Research Fellow
DAAD Visiting Fellow
Germany

Theresa Reinold is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB). She holds a PhD in Political Science and is especially interested in issues that lie at the intersection of International Relations and International Law. Prior to joining the WZB, she was a research assistant at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs and a postdoctoral research fellow at Goethe University Frankfurt. She has also been a visiting student/scholar at UPenn, Yale, and Harvard. Her research interests include IR-theory, public international law, and comparative regionalism. Her current research explores how global rule of law scripts travel to the African context, how they are “vernacularized” by regional and subregional actors, and to what extent these processes of norm vernacularization in the global periphery feed back to the center.

She may be contacted at tsr4@nyu.edu.

Research Project: The Rule of Law and African Regionalism

 

Paolo Saguato
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Paolo Saguato is a Senior Research Fellow at the Genoa Center for Law and Finance, Italy. In 2013 he completed a Ph.D. in Business, Private and International Law at the University of Genoa, defending a thesis on credit derivatives regulation before and after the financial crisis.

He holds a JD summa cum laude from the University of Genoa. He obtained his LLM at Yale Law School, where he was Fulbright Scholar and senior editor of the Yale Journal on Regulation. During his PhD he was Research and Teaching Assistant in Business Law and Financial Markets; he was visiting researcher at St. John’s College – University of Oxford with a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship; and he attended courses in economics, finance and law at the London School of Economics; Gerzensee Study Centre in Bern, Switzerland; House of Finance - Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany. He is Academic Member of ECGI (European Corporate Governance Institute), Member of the EFLN (European Financial Law Network) and member of PEPP (Program in European Private Law for Postgraduates).

His current researches mainly focuses on financial derivative contracts (specially equity and credit derivatives) and their regulation in the US and in the EU, looking at the dynamics of international financial regulation and the trade-off between private and public regulation. At NYU he will be working on a research project on global financial regulation.

Research Project: A New Approach to Global Financial Market Regulation: the Shadow Banking System

 

Michal Saliternik
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Michal Saliternik has recently completed her doctoral studies in the Direct PhD Program at Tel-Aviv University Law School, from which she also received her LLB (magna cum laude). Her dissertation examines the international regulation of peace processes from theoretical and doctrinal perspectives. Michal's main research interests include international legal theory, political theory, international negotiation, international conflict resolution, and post-conflict transitions. Her research has led to several presentations and publications, including a chapter on “The Treatment of Occupation Legislation by Courts in Liberated Territories” (with Eyal Benvenisti), in Edda Kristjánsdóttir, Andre Nollkaemper and Cedric Ryngaert (eds.), International Law in Domestic Courts: Rule of Law Reform in Post-Conflict States (Intersentia, 2012). Michal received several grants and awards for her doctoral research, among them from the Zvi Meitar Center for Advanced Legal Studies, the Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research, and the Institute for Diplomacy and Regional Cooperation at Tel-Aviv University.

Prior to her doctoral studies, Michal worked as researcher and project director in two influential Israeli think tanks, the Economic Cooperation Foundation and the Geneva Initiative, where she focused on the problems of the Palestinian refugees and absentees’ property. She also served as a teaching assistant at the Tel-Aviv University Law School in the areas of tort law and contract law. Michal clerked at the Israel State Attorney Offices in the High Court of Justice Department in Jerusalem. As a Global Research Fellow at NYU Law School, Michal will explore feasible strategies for implementing procedural justice standards (e.g., participation, transparency and reason-giving) in peace negotiations.

Research Project: Procedural Justice in Peace Negotiations

 

Judit Sándor
Global Research Fellow
Hungary

Judit Sándor is Professor in the Departments of Political Science, Legal Studies and Gender Studies at the Central European University (CEU), Budapest. She has been teaching graduate international students for twenty years. She passed the bar exam in Hungary, practiced law at Simmons & Simmons in London, and received fellowships at McGill (Montreal), Stanford (Palo Alto), and the Maison de sciences de l’homme (Paris). In 1996 she received her PhD in law and political science. She was one of the founders of the first Patients' Right Organizations (‘Szószóló’) in Hungary, has been a member of the Hungarian Science and Research Ethics Council, and is currently a member of the Hungarian Human Reproduction Commission.

She has participated in various national and international standard-setting and legislative projects in the field of biomedical law. In 2004-2005, she served as Chief of the Bioethics Section at UNESCO. She has published seven books in the area of human rights and biomedical law. Her works have appeared in several languages, including Hungarian, English, French and Portuguese. Since September 2005, she is a founding director of the Center for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine (CELAB) at the Central European University. She has completed ten European research projects funded by the European Commission in the fields of biobanks, genetic data, stem cell research, organ transplantation and human reproduction.

Research Project: Commodification of The Human Body - Global Challenges To Biomedical Law

 

Paul Scott
Global Research Fellow
New Zealand

Paul Scott is a Senior Lecturer in the Law Faculty at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. He has first degrees in law and economics and a Masters specialising in competition law. He teaches competition law, commercial law and the law of contract. His primary research focus is in competition law and has published a number of articles in the area. In 2013 he has co-authored “Guide to Competition Law” (LexisNexis, 2013).

Research Project: A Positive and Normative Analysis of the Influence of United States and European Antitrust Law and Scholarship on New Zealand Competition Law

 

Sandesh Sivakumaran
Global Research Fellow
United Kingdom

Sandesh Sivakumaran is Associate Professor and Reader in Public International Law at the University of Nottingham School of Law. His research interests are in the area of general public international law, particularly international human rights, international humanitarian law and international criminal law.
 
He is the author of The Law of Non-International Armed Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2012) and co-editor of International Human Rights Law (Oxford University Press, 2 ed, 2013). He is a member of the board of editors of the Leiden Journal of International Law, the Journal of International Criminal Justice and the Human Rights Law Review. His work has been awarded the Giorgio La Pira Prize, the Antonio Cassese Prize and the Francis Lieber Prize.
 
Sandesh advises and acts as expert for a range of states, international organizations and non-governmental organizations. He has also worked at the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

Research Project: Conceptualizing an International Disaster Response Law

 

Richard Stacey
Global Research Fellow
South Africa

Dr. Richard Stacey (South Africa) is the Director of Research at the Center for Constitutional Transitions at NYU Law. He graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, with degrees in political philosophy and law, and served as law clerk to Justice Kate O’Regan and Justice Bess Nkabinde at the Constitutional Court of South Africa. He has taught courses in political theory, constitutional law, administrative law and human rights at the University of the Witwatersrand, the University of Cape Town and CUNY Law School. He serves as co-editor of the multi-author reference work Constitutional Law of South Africa, to which he has contributed chapters on socio-economic rights and executive authority, and his work has appeared in a number of books and journals of law and political theory. His current research focuses on whether the law, and in particular the concept of the rule of law, is meaningful and useful in efforts to fulfil the right to water.

Between 2005 and 2010 he acted as an advisor on administrative law to the South African Department of Justice, and has advised the South African Parliament on matters of legislative drafting. In 2009, he acted as a consultant to Kenya’s Committee of Experts on Constitutional Review.

As Research Director at the Center for Constitutional Transitions at NYU Law, Richard coordinates international networks of researchers and scholars as part of the research projects the Center has under way or in development, manages the Center’s research outputs, and contributes to the Center’s clinical and expert support for constitutional transitions around the world (learn more at constitutionaltransitions.org).

Research Project: The Rule of Law and the Role of the Courts in the Pursuit of Social Justice

 

Aisling Swaine
Global Research Fellow
Ireland

Aisling Swaine completed her doctorate at the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland where she is also currently a Visiting Fellow.  Previously, Aisling spent over seven years working full-time in conflict-affected and fragile states (Kosovo, Burundi, Timor-Leste and Darfur, Sudan) for international NGOs and the United Nations, and an additional seven years as an independent consultant and has spent time in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda and South Africa in this regard.

Aisling will join George Washington University’s Elliot School of International Affairs as Associate Professor of Practice on Women, Security and Development in January 2014.

Aisling has authored several academic and policy publications on issues relating to gender violence, women, peace and security and gender and humanitarian action.  Aisling continues to consult globally to the United Nations, international donors and NGOs.  Aisling is also a Senior Gender Adviser on the United Nations IASC Gender Capacity Roster.

Aisling’s research explores violence against women related to conflict, exploring connections between the peak in violence that women experience in conflict and the wider spectrum of violence that women experience before and after conflict, with a focus on understanding international legal approaches to gendered violence within post-conflict transition.

Research Project: Making Transition Transformational for Women: An Analysis of Gender Violence Across
Pre, During and Post-Conflict Contexts

 

Jacob Weinrib
Global Research Fellow
Canada

Jacob Weinrib graduated in 2013 from the Combined JD/PhD Program in Law and Philosophy at the University of Toronto.  His dissertation is entitled: “Authority, Justice, and Public Law: A Unified Theory.”  The dissertation formulates an integrated theory of the juridical relationship between the individual and the state.  Whereas competing theories reduce this relationship to either the sum of norms enacted through the contingent exercise of public authority or the timeless demands of justice, the dissertation argues that when authority and justice are appropriately conceived and justified, they are neither antithetical virtues of opposing theoretical frameworks nor isolated notions. Instead, authority and justice are the mutually implicating principles of a legal system: the right of rulers to exercise public authority is always accompanied by a duty to govern justly; the right of the ruled to just governance presupposes the presence of publicly authoritative institutions. This framework offers both a powerful alternative to the established positions in contemporary legal philosophy and an innovative justification of rights-based constitutional democracy.  

Jacob’s research interests include the philosophy of law, constitutional theory, and comparative constitutional law.  His articles have appeared in Law and Philosophy, The Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence, Kantian Review, and The Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy.  His articles can be accessed here.  He is the recipient of numerous prizes, awards, and fellowships, including the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship awarded by the Social Science and Humanities Resource Council of Canada.  His CV can be viewed here

As a Global Research Fellow, Jacob’s research project draws on his unified theory of public law to illuminate and justify the distinctive institutional arrangements and doctrinal features common to constitutional democracies around the world.  

Research Project: The Theory and Practice of Modern Constitutional Law

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Academic Year 2012-2013 

 

Global Research Fellow BesirevicVioleta Beširević
Global Research Fellow
Serbia

Violeta Beširević is a Professor of Law at Union University Law School Belgrade. She holds an LLM and an SJD in Comparative Constitutional Law from the Central European University (CEU), which is an American graduate institution based in Budapest and incorporated in the State of New York. She works in the field of comparative constitutional law, human rights law, medical law and international criminal law. Her recent research includes the issues of transitional constitutionalism in Serbia, militant democracy in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and a study of improving the effectiveness of the organ trade prohibition in Europe, written together with researchers working under the Coordination Action on ‘Living Organ Donation in Europe’, funded by the European Commission.

Professor Beširević is also a member of the Board of Directors of the European Public Law Organization, a member of the Pardon Committee appointed by the President of the Republic of Serbia and a Research Associate at the CEU Center for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine, Budapest. Her previous posts include Research Coordinator at the CEU Center for Human Rights, Senior Diplomat and Head of the Consular Department at the Embassy of Serbia in Hungary, Staff Attorney at the Constitutional and Legislative Policy Institute affiliated with the Open Society Fund and CEU in Budapest, and Senior Legal Adviser at the Ministry of Justice of the former Yugoslavia.

Research Project: The Politics of the Constitutional Court in Serbia

 

Global Research Fellow BulmashHagit Bulmash
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Hagit Bulmash completed her doctorate studies at the Faculty of Law's Zvi Meitar Center for Advanced Legal Studies, after graduating her LLB and LLM (both magna cum laude) at Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Law. Following her graduation and until 2008 she practiced law as an antitrust and corporate lawyer in Israeli leading law firms. In 2007 she was selected as Deputy of the Chairman of The Israel Bar, Antitrust Committee. During her LLM she was the Editor of the Antitrust Section in the professional corporate site – www.4balance.com and provided legal opinions and articles concerning Antitrust Law.

The title of her dissertation is “Empirical Analysis of Secondary Line Price Discrimination According to the Antitrust Law". In her dissertation, Hagit uses a new methodology which she developed based on empirical research of court files using electronic databases. Her doctorate was conducted under the supervision of Professor David Gilo, TAU Law faculty who was recently appointed as the Head of the Israeli Antitrust Authority. Her recent article got published in the Oxfords' Journal of Competition Law and Economics. Her research is currently of utmost importance considering the emergence of the controversy around competitiveness in Israeli economy.

Along with her research work, Hagit serves as a lecturer at Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Law. Her course - Contracts and Competition Law deals with antitrust and contract law issues relating to contractual relationships between corporations. In light of her academic achievements, Hagit was awarded a Meitar Fellowship, and she was awarded as the 2011 doctorate representative of the Law and Economic workshop in Siena – Toronto -Tel Aviv law and economic workshop. She was invited to present her doctorate thesis in faculty workshops at Tel Aviv University, Haifa University and Hebrew University and The Israeli Law and Economic Association 2011 yearly conference.

Research Project: Using Secondary Line Price Discrimination to Prevent Free Ride – Empirical Research

 

Global Research Fellow CasiniLorenzo Casini
Global Research Fellow & Mauro Cappelletti Global Fellow in Comparative Law
Italy

Lorenzo Casini is an Associate Professor at the University Sapienza of Rome, where he teaches Town and Country Planning Law and Cultural Property Law at the Faculty of Architecture since 2002. He also teaches Legislation on Cultural Heritage and Landscape in the PhD Program in Management and Development of Cultural Heritage at the IMT-Institute for Advanced Studies (Lucca, Italy).

After graduating in Law cum laude in 1999, he obtained a PhD in European and Comparative Administrative Law from the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in 2004. From 2008-2009 he was a Research Fellow here at NYU for the Global Administrative Project. He is currently serving as a law clerk to Justice Professor Sabino Cassese at the Constitutional Court of Italy. He is also Secretary general of the Institute for Research on Public Administration (IRPA).

He has written over 70 articles on cultural property, urban planning law, and comparative and global administrative law. His publications include three books: on Town and Country Planning (L’equilibrio degli interessi nel governo del territorio, Giuffrè, 2005), on Global Sports Law (Il diritto globale dello sport, 2010), and on the Globalization of Cultural Properties (editor, La Globalizzazione dei beni culturali, il Mulino, 2010). He is co-editor of Global Administrative Law: Cases, Materials, Issues (2nd edition, 2008; 3rd edition 2012) and special editor (with Laurence Boisson de Chazournes and Benedict Kingsbury) of the Symposium on "Global Administrative Law in the Operations of International Organizations", 6:2 International Organizations Law Review (2009).

Research Project: Public Law and Private Law Beyond the State

 

Global Research Fellow ChekrounDavid Chekroun
Global Research Fellow
France

David Chekroun is a Tenured Professor of Business Law at ESCP Europe and is the co-faculty chair for the "Law & Finance" major. He is based in the campuses of London and Paris. Doctor of Law of the Sorbonne Law School, obtaining a Postgraduate degree in Business Law and a Master in European Business, he lectures International Arbitration and Litigation, European Civil Procedure, Comparative Business Law, International Business Law and Energy Law.

At ESCP Europe, he is the co-director of the Law & Finance major, that offers students an unparalleled combination of legal and financial education. Prior to joining ESCP Europe, he was an assistant professor at University of Paris XI – Jean Monnet where he taught Private International Law, Business Law, International Business Law. He continues to lecture International Arbitration at the Sorbonne Law School on Doctoral programs.

David Chekroun was involved in workshops with legal experts that aimed to improve the systems of Judicial Review in Civil and Criminal proceedings of several European countries. He trained Afghan judges and legal experts at the Max Planck Institute & the Institut International of Paris. He trains qualified Judges at the French National School for the Judiciary on the Common law system and organizes conferences on Criminal & Civil justice in Europe.He is a member of the Editorial Committee of the Think Tank « Conventions » from the French Ministery of Foreign and European Affairs & the Institut des hautes études sur la justice. He is a member of the Sorbonne Law School Institute of judicial studies & the British Institute of International and Comparative Law.

He is admitted to the Paris Bar and worked in the Litigation and Arbitration department of Herbert Smith LLP. In addition he was Scholar-in-Residence to the International Arbitration Group at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP (London office). He also advised, as a legal consultant, law firms and companies in international arbitration proceedings in the field of finance and energy.

His research interests are mainly, International Business Law, Law & Finance, Judicial Studies, Energy Law and Arbitration Law. He completed his Doctorate in Law at on the “arbitral imperium” and he is the editor-in-chief of the Energy law section of the International Business Law Journal / IBLJ. He is currently writing a book on “International Business Dispute Resolution in France.”

Research Project: Transnational Discovery Conflicts: Will the EU Data Protection Reform Proposals Change the Balance?

 

Global Research Fellow GuimaraesValéria Guimarães de Lima e Silva
Global Research Fellow
Brazil

Dr. Valéria Guimarães de Lima e Silva, a Brazilian national, is a Global Research Fellow at the NYU Hauser Global Law School Program. Valéria was previously an Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, and at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. She holds a PhD degree in International Law from the University of São Paulo, Brazil, and a Masters in International Law and Economics from the World Trade Institute, Switzerland.

More recently, she was in charge of the International Department of the Brazilian competition authority CADE, where she has previously held the position of Chief of Staff. She also worked as a Bluebook Trainee at the European Commission, DG Competition. She has previously worked as an attorney for the second largest Intellectual Property law firm of Latin America, as well as branch manager of a law firm in the city of Rio de Janeiro. While living in Taiwan she has worked as legal counsel for a Taiwanese biotechnology company.

Her fields of research are International Economic Law, Global Economic Governance, Intellectual Property Rights, Competition Policy, Health and Development. She has published a book on international aspects of competition laws, as well as papers in specialized journals in Brazil and abroad. Her current research focuses on soft power dynamics at various multilateral organizations to advance intellectual property rights enforcement.

Research Project: How to Reshape Treaties without Negotiations: Intellectual Property Enforcement as a Case Study

 

Hauser Research Scholar FlanaganBrian Flanagan
Hauser Research Scholar
Fulbright Scholar in Law
Ireland

Dr Brian Flanagan is a graduate of University College Dublin, Université Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) and Oxford University.  His work on legal interpretation and judicial decision-making has been published in the International & Comparative Law Quarterly, the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, the Journal of Moral Philosophy and Ratio Juris.  While a Hauser Research Scholar, Dr Flanagan will undertake research into the notion of collective legislative intentionality and the role of conceptual analysis in general jurisprudence.  Dr Flanagan is a lecturer at the School of Law, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

http://law.nuim.ie/staff/dr-brian-flanagan

 

Global Research Fellow KatzAriel Katz
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Ariel Katz is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, where he holds the Innovation Chair in Electronic Commerce and the Director of the Centre for Innovation Law and Policy. Professor Katz received his LLB and LLM from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and his SJD from the University of Toronto. His general area of research involves economic analysis of competition law and intellectual property law, with allied interests in electronic commerce, pharmaceutical regulation, the regulation of international trade, and particularly the intersection of these fields. Prior to joining the University of Toronto Professor Katz was a staff attorney at the Israeli Antitrust Authority. While there, he litigated several merger appeals and restrictive arrangements cases before the Antitrust Tribunal and negotiated regulatory settlements. Professor Katz currently teaches courses on intellectual property, cyberlaw, and the intersection of competition law and intellectual property.

Research Project: The Rebirth of Fair Dealing: From the University of London to the University of British Columbia (and from Oxbridge to Georgia State)

 

Global Research Fellow ParolinGianluca Parolin
Global Research Fellow
Egypt

Gianluca P. Parolin is assistant professor of law in the American University in Cairo, Egypt, where he teaches comparative law, comparative constitutional law, and Islamic law reform. Gianluca earned his LLB/LLM (University of Torino, Italy) in comparative public law with a thesis on the caliphate and contemporary forms of government in Muslim-majority countries, and his PhD (University of Torino, Italy) in public law with a dissertation on the multiple levels of membership and political participation in Arab states (Citizenship in the Arab World, Amsterdam University Press, 2009).

Fascinated by the first constitutional transition of the 21st century in the region, Gianluca contributed to the debate on the new Bahraini constitution and was invited to observe the first parliamentary elections in thirty years. Gianluca has followed Bahrain ever since, and has recently published a comparative study of the role of parliament in 1973-75 and after the 2002 constitution in an edited book titled: Political Change in the Arab Gulf states: Stuck in Transition (Lynne Rienner, 2011).

Asked to be the rapporteur on constitutional provisions on shari‘ah to the Second Conference of the International Consortium on Law and Religion Studies (ICLARS) in 2011, Gianluca has started developing a coherent comparative overview of such provisions within the overall trajectory of legal systems in Muslim-majority countries.
Since 25 January 2011, Gianluca has offered special courses on the constitutional transition in Egypt and has actively participated in the public debate over a variety of issues associated with the transition and constitutional design.

Research Project: (Re)arrangements of šariʿah and Secular Law in Constitutional Transitions

 

Hauser Research Scholar PetersenNiels Petersen
Hauser Research Scholar
DAAD Visiting Fellow
Emile Noel Fellow (courtesy appointment)
Germany

Niels Petersen is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods. His main areas of research are international law, comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory. He holds a Ph.D. in law from the University of Frankfurt and an M.A. in Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences from Columbia University. Furthermore, he worked as a legal advisor for the GIZ Legal Advisory Service in Beijing in 2005/06 and was a Visiting Professor at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin in spring 2012. At NYU, Niels will be working on a project on the Rationality of balancing in constitutional adjudication. The aim of the project is to compare different approaches of constitutional courts with regard to the resolution of conflicting constitutional values.

 

Global Research Fellow SegevRe'em Segev
Global Research Fellow & Neil MacCormick Fellow in Legal Theory
Israel

Re’em Segev is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He earned his LLB (summa cum laude), LLM (magna cum laude) and PhD from the Hebrew University and was a visiting researcher at the University of California-Berkeley, Harvard University and New-York University. Dr. Segev received various awards, including the Fulbright Post-Doctoral Award. His research interests are moral philosophy and philosophy of law, and specifically distributive justice, moral justification under uncertainty, the moral foundation of criminal law (especially the implications of distributive justice and uncertainty for justificatory defenses), the moral foundation of public law (balancing, discrimination, freedom of expression and counter-terror measures), and legal interpretation. Dr. Segev has published articles on these topics in philosophical, legal and interdisciplinary journals, including Philosophical Studies, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Utilitas, Law & Philosophy, Criminal Law & Philosophy, Ratio Juris, and the Journal of Medicine & Philosophy.

Research Project: Making Sense of Discrimination

 

Global Research Fellow StewartJames Stewart
Global Research Fellow
New Zealand

Professor Stewart joined UBC law in August 2009, after spending two years as an Associate-in-Law at Columbia Law School in New York. Prior to his time at Columbia, Professor Stewart was an Appeals Counsel with the Prosecution of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He has also worked for the Legal Division of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Prosecution of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. His research focuses on corporate responsibility for international crimes, drawing on international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, international human rights, comparative criminal law, theory of criminal law, public International law, and corporate criminal liability.

Professor Stewart initially graduated from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand with degrees in both law and philosophy. He has since completed an Diplôme d'études approfondies in international law at the Université de Genève and is currently finishing a JSD at Columbia University in New York. He has taught at Columbia Law School, Queens University's summer program on international law, and the University of Geneva. Professor Stewart was also the Chair of Editorial Board of Journal of International Criminal Justice between 2007 and 2010, and is presently an appointed member of the Institute of International Humanitarian Law.

In 2006, Professor Stewart received the La Pira Prize for his article on unlawful confinement at Guantanamo. In 2010, he was awarded the Cassese Prize for his ongoing work on the liability of corporate actors for international crimes. In 2011, he was a Fellow with the Open Society Initiative in New York for an aspect of this work that deals with the accomplice liability of arms vendors. As part of this project, he was also a Visiting Fellow at Oxford's Centre for Criminology. In 2011, he was awarded the Aurora Prize from the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) as "an outstanding new researcher who is building a reputation for exciting and original research in the social sciences or humanities.

Research Project: Atrocity, Commerce and Accountability: The International Criminal Liability of Corporate Actors

 

Global Research Fellow WangMingyuan Wang
Global Research Fellow
China

Dr. Mingyuan Wang is a Professor of Law at Tsinghua University in Beijing. He is also the Executive Director of the Center for Environmental, Natural Resources & Energy Law, an inter-faculty research institute at Tsinghua University, and the Vice President of the Environmental Law Society under the Chinese Academy of Environmental Sciences.

He works in the fields of energy law, environmental and natural resources law, infrastructure and urban planning law, and law for technology, in particular biotechnology regulation. He obtained his B.S. and LLM at Peking University (1988 and 1992), and PhD at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (1999).

Before he joined Tsinghua University Law School, he had worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University (1999-2001). During 2002-2003, he was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School and Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Research Project: Legal Aspects of Climate Change: Is There any Inspiration from the US and Europe for the Development of Carbon Market in China?

 

Global Research Fellow ZingalesNicolo Zingales
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Nicolo Zingales is a senior PhD researcher in International Law and Economics at Bocconi University. Prior to coming to NYU, he was a teaching fellow at Bocconi and scholarship holder (“Stipendiat”) at the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition. His research focuses on the incorporation of economics into law in a number of areas, including antitrust, WTO and international arbitration.

During his academic career, Nicolo has been an exchange student at Universidad Abat Oliba and UC Berkeley, a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School and a research assistant at the College of Europe in Bruges. He has also gained practical experience as a trainee at the European Commission (Directorate General for Competition) and at the Cabinet of Judge Moavero Milanesi at the EU General Court.

His project as a Global Research Fellow concerns a comparison on the role of presumptions in WTO and competition law.

Research Project: Safeguarding Due Process in Presumptive Adjudication

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Academic Year 2011-2012

 

Nicholas Bamforth
Senior Global Research Fellow
UK

Nicholas Bamforth is a tenured member of the Law faculty at Oxford University, where he is Fellow in Law at The Queen's College. His research and teaching interests are in the areas of constitutional and administrative law (including comparative constitutional law), legal theory, human rights law and sexuality and law. His two most recent books are Patriarchal Religion, Sexuality and Gender: A Critique of New Natural Law (with David A.J. Richards, Cambridge University Press 2008) and Discrimination Law: Theory and Context (with Maleiha Malik and Colm O'Cinneide, Thomson/Sweet & Maxwell 2008). During 2011-2, he will be working on a book on English human rights law (with Laura Hoyano) for publication by Oxford University Press, on a single-authored book on the public law-private law distinction, and on a project on imperialism, sexuality and law, with David Richards. He also has an active interest in higher education policy, academic freedom and university governance, and has published in the Times Higher Education, Times and Guardian on topics within this field, as well as serving as a member of Oxford's University Council between 2006 and 2011.



Rephael Ben-Ari
Global Research Fellow & Neil MacCormick Fellow in Legal Theory
Israel

Dr. Har'el R. Ben-Ari, PhD (Bar-Ilan University, Israel); LL.M (Public International Law) (cum laude) (Leiden University, Holland); LL.B (cum laude) (Tel-Aviv University, Israel), currently teaches courses and seminars in Public International Law and International Criminal Law, within the LL.B and LL.M programs at the Law Faculty of the Bar-Ilan University. His past professional record also includes the unique positions of an Assistant to the Legal Adviser to the Israel MFA and the Legal Adviser to the Israel Mission in The Hague. When he held these positions, Dr. Ben-Ari was exposed first hand to major international legal developments at their inception, and he took part in the formulation of official policy in various international legal matters. His doctoral research was conducted under the auspices of the Doctoral Fellowships of Excellence Program at Bar-Ilan University – the University's most distinguished doctoral fellowship, under the supervision of the Head of the Political Science Department and the Program on Conflict Management and Negotiation. Dr. Ben-Ari's book, entitled 'The Normative Position of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) Under International Law – An Analytical Framework', was recently published (2012) under the auspices of Martinus Nijhoff publishers. Based on his PhD dissertation, the book engages in a contextual-historical and interdisciplinary evaluation of the potential of contemporary juridical theories regarding the position of INGOs vis-à-vis the subjects of international law to generate solutions for the exercise of unregulated authority outside the state-system.

 

Congyan Cai
Global Research Fellow
China

Cai Congyan is a professor of international law at Xiamen University School of Law, China. He also is a member of Editorial Board of Journal of East Asia and International Law (JEAIL) published in Korea. His research fields cover public international law, international investment law, and WTO law. His recently focuses on risk society and the evolution of international legal process, “private/public law division” in international law, Great Powers issue in international law from the rising China’s perspective, and structural transformation of investment treaties. His recent articles have been published at such journal as Journal of International Economic Law (JIEL), Chinese Journal of International Law (CJIL), Journal of World Investment & Trade (JWIT), and Manchester Journal of International Economic Law (MJIEL). He sometimes is consulted by China’s Government concerning investment treaty affairs. He may be contacted at caicongyan@xmu.edu.cn

 

Georgios Dimitropoulos
Hauser Research Scholar
Greece

Georgios Dimitropoulos completed his Ph.D. at the University of Heidelberg, Germany in 2011 under the supervision of Prof. Eberhard Schmidt-Aßmann with the grade summa cum laude. The title of his thesis is “Zertifizierung und Akkreditierung im Internationalen Vewaltungsverbund” (“Certification and accreditation in the context of international integrated administration”) and his monograph with the same title will be published by Mohr Siebeck Publishers. Georgios’ doctoral research was supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Georgios studied law at the Universities of Athens and Heidelberg. He also holds an LL.M. from the University of Heidelberg. In 2008, he obtained the Academy of European Public Law Diploma from the European Public Law Organization (EPLO).During his Ph.D. studies, Georgios was a research assistant to Prof. Schmidt-Aßmann at the Institute for German and European Administrative Law of the University of Heidelberg and at the interdisciplinary research institute FEST e.V., Heidelberg. He also performed independent research at the library of the European Commission in Brussels and the Italian Constitutional Court. Georgios has published in the fields of Global and EU administrative law and the theory of public law in English, German and Greek. During his stay at NYU Law School, Georgios will be conducting research on peer reviews of administrative bodies in global and EU law, focusing on the fields of conformity assessment, finance, nuclear safety and OECD law. He will be furthermore exploring the rising phenomenon of global administrative self-regulation. Prof. Richard Stewart will be his sponsor at NYU.

 

Tim Dornis
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Germany

Tim Dornis has been a judge at the District Court of Stuttgart (Germany) from 2006 until 2011. He has recently been appointed as a Professor of Private Law, International Private and Economic Law, and Comparative Law at the Leuphana University of Lueneburg (Germany). Tim graduated from the University of Tuebingen (Germany) in 1999 and 2005 (J.D. equivalent and Ph.D.). In addition, he received degrees from Columbia University School of Law/New York (LL.M., James Kent Scholar) and from Stanford Law School (J.S.M.). Before becoming a judge, Tim practiced law in an international law firm. He is also admitted as an attorney and counselor in New York State. The focus of Tim’s research lies on the fields of conflict of laws, European and international economic law, as well as IP law and unfair competition protection. Recent publications also include an economic analysis of contract law and non-contractual obligations. At NYU, Tim will work on a historical-comparative, doctrinal, and economic analysis of United States and European trademark and unfair competition conflicts law.

 

Jasper Finke
Global Research Fellow
Germany

Jasper Finke is a senior researcher and lecturer at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). He works in the fields of public international law, international economic law, and legal theory. His current research project focuses on crisis and law, in particular the relation between crisis and the re-interpretation of existing laws. In addition, he has recently worked on issues of sovereign immunity with regard to the pending case of Germany v. Italy and on the legal controversy over the banning of the veil in France. He holds a PhD in Public International Law from the University Kiel (2003). His thesis on parallel dispute settlement procedures in public international law was published in 2004. Still, upon completion of his graduate studies, he decided that it was time to leave academia for a while. For three years, he worked as a lawyer in a Berlin-based law firm that advises energy companies. His responsibilities included the implementation of European energy regulation and the drafting of energy contracts – but while he enjoyed advising clients and getting to know a more hands-on perspective on law, drafting energy contracts soon lost its attraction. A year spent at Columbia University convinced him that he wanted to return to academia and ever since receiving the LLM degree, he has worked as a senior researcher and lecturer.



Jennifer Koshan
Global Research Fellow
Canada

Jennifer Koshan is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of Calgary, Canada. Before joining the Faculty, Professor Koshan practiced law for several years in the Northwest Territories as a Crown prosecutor, and she worked as the Legal Director of the British Columbia branch of the Women's Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF), a non-profit equality rights organization. Her teaching and research interests are in the areas of constitutional law, equality and human rights law, criminal law, violence against women, and public interest advocacy. In 2004 Professor Koshan was awarded The University of Calgary Faculty Association's Community Service Award for her contributions to the equality seeking community, and in April of 2010 she received a Students' Union Teaching Excellence Award for Constitutional Law. Her recent research has included a study of the judicial treatment of marital rape in Canada over the past 27 years for the Equality Effect, and evaluations of civil and criminal domestic violence regimes in Alberta, Canada. Professor Koshan is also a founding member of the Women’s Court of Canada, a group of academics, activists, and litigators who are rewriting the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms equality jurisprudence.



Choong-Kee Lee
Global Research Fellow
Korea

Dr. Choong Kee Lee is a Professor of Law at Hongik University in Seoul. He works in the fields of commercial, financial, corporate and trust law. He obtained his LLB and LLM at Seoul National University (1986 and 1988), LL.M at Cambridge University (1991) and PhD at Sheffield University (1994). He produced in-depth research on financial regulation, focusing in particular on the British establishment of a single, unified financial regulator and influenced on Korean establishment of a single financial regulator. He participated as an expert adviser in drafting Consolidated Asset Management Act 2003 and other financial Acts. He has also conducted groundbreaking research regarding the introduction of Anglo-American concept of fiduciary law and trusts in Korea, and advised Korean government on introducing/amending Trusts and Trusts-related Acts and served on a number of related government committees. He authored Trusts Law (2007), the most-read and authoritative trusts law text book in Korea and wrote numerous articles and chapters in books.

 

Libin Li
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
China

Libin Li is a Chinese attorney and labor dispute arbitrator in China. His primary specialty is in Chinese labor and employment law, corporate law. In 2005, he published "Employment Contract Implemented for Third Party". In September, 2010, he made a presentation entitled "Labor Risks on Multi-national Corporate Governance in China" in Nagoya, Japan. In 2010, he participated in a legal project relating to the social relief law of Guangdong province at the Sun Yat Sen University School of Law. Therefore, He was appointed as a part time researcher in 2011.He obtained a Juries Doctor degree from the Chinese University of Hong Kong school of law in 2008 and a Bachelor's degree from the Sun Yat Sen University School of law in 2002. And in 2010, he studied trade secret law at the Nagoya University School of law. The topic of his research at NYU is "the Information Disclosure for Collective Bargaining". Little attention on the theoretical research has bogged down collective bargaining in the workplace in China. His research is aimed at reconstructing and improving the current information disclosure mechanisms.

 

Graham Mayeda
Senior Global Research Fellow
Canada


Graham Mayeda is an associate professor of law at the University of Ottawa, Canada. He began his academic career in philosophy, in which he received both MA and PhD degrees from the University of Toronto. His current research focuses on the impact of international trade and investment law on developing countries. He has begun a new project on theories of global justice, which aims at articulating a concept of global justice that takes into account the diverse perspectives of developing countries, as well as a project on the impact of the anti-terrorism policy of Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom on developing countries. He is also interested in the impact of cultural, socio-economic, racial and gender difference in Canadian criminal law. In the area of legal theory, he has written about the nature of common law reasoning and on theories of judgment.
Prof. Mayeda is also very involved in legal advocacy. In November, 2006, he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC). ISAC is a legal aid clinic established by Legal Aid Ontario in 2001 to conduct test-case litigation for low-income residents of Ontario (http://www.incomesecurity.org/). Graham has also been involved in litigation with dimensions of both criminal and environmental law. He is currently doing legal consulting for the Commonwealth Secretariat on international investment agreements and developing countries.

 

Federico Parmeggiani
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Federico Parmeggiani has completed a PhD in Law and Economics at University of Siena, defending a thesis about the economic function and the regulation of credit rating agencies. In 2011 he has been appointed as lecturer of Corporate Law at University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Faculty of Economics. His main research interests encompass economic analysis of corporate law, securities and financial markets regulation, corporate governance and the economic and legal structure of cooperative companies. His research works have so far related to the effects and the regulation of credit ratings, internal and external controls in corporate governance and shareholders rights. Federico also attended courses on economic and corporate topics at Fordham University School of Law, University of Trento and Gerzensee Study Centre in Bern, Switzerland. Before getting a PhD in Law and Economics, Federico Parmeggiani obtained a Master Degree in Law cum laude at University of Bologna, where after the graduation he started to work as assistant at the Corporate Law Chair.During his academic career Federico has also collaborated with several institutions on corporate and securities law topics. In 2010 he was part of a task force of academics and legal professionals appointed by the TAIEX Office of the European Commission to teach european securities regulation at financial institutions in Turkey and Libya. Such project was aimed at providing those countries’ institutions with a better knowledge about recent european legal developments and about the solutions adopted by member states in implementing EU regulation. At NYU he will be working on a research project on the use of rating triggers in bond indentures, assessing the need for a specific regulation in such sector.



Francesca Romanin-Jacur
Global Research Fellow & Mauro Cappelletti Global Fellow in Comparative Law
Italy

Francesca Romanin Jacur is Researcher in International Law at the University of Milano, Italy. She is a qualified lawyer, admitted to the Milan Bar. In 2007 she obtained her PhD in International Law from the University of Milano. In 2003 she achieved a Diplôme des Haute Etudes Supérieurs (DESUP) at the Paris University (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne/ Collège des Hautes Etudes Européennes Miguel Servet) in EU Law. Her research and her publications are on international environmental law. She has been working as legal adviser to the Italian Ministry of the Environment providing assistance in environmental and climate change law. She was responsible for supervising and facilitating the implementation of greenhouse gases emission reductions projects in the Western Balkans. Since 2003 she holds teaching activities on international law in Italian Universities and abroad. She held capacity-building workshops in Northern Africa (Morocco, Tunisia) and in the Balkans on environmental and climate change law.



Melanie Samson
Global Research Fellow
France

Dr. Mélanie Samson is a public international lawyer specializing in global health Law. She holds a Master’s degree in public law from the Paris VIII University and an LLM and PhD in international law from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. In October 2010, she defended her PhD thesis on “Public Health Protection and International Economic Law: Health Security under the Challenges of Globalization”. During her doctoral studies, she worked as a research and teaching assistant at the Graduate Institute of Geneva. Dr. Samson’s areas of research and professional interest are international economic law, global health Law and public health. She has published on various aspects of International Law and health law, including the issue of access to medicines in developing countries and her PhD dissertation is currently under preparation for publication. She has previously worked with the World Health Organization, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the Health Law Research Network of the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie and the French Delegation to the World Trade Organization. More recently, she worked for the French National Cancer Institute (“INCa”) as Head of Projects for more than three years on developing and implementing regulations and standards on the quality of cancer care at the national level and participated in numerous cancer-related international conferences. During her residency at NYU Law School, she will focus on global health standards and the transformation of the international regulatory landscape.

 

Emanuel Towfigh
Hauser Research Scholar
Germany

Dr Emanuel V. Towfigh is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn, Germany. He studied Law, Economics and Chinese at the Universities of Münster (Germany) and Nanjing (PR China), and subsequently completed his Legal Clerkship. He earned his Ph.D. with an award-winning dissertation on the legal constitution of religious communities under state and religious legal regimes at the University of Münster in 2005, where he worked as a Research Fellow between 2003 and 2007. Since 2011, he is an elected member of the German Young Academy at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and at the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. His present research focuses on constitutional law and constitutional theory, applying a behavioral law and economics perspective, and heavily drawing on empirical methods. Currently, he works on questions of political parties, democratic representation, and legitimacy.

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Academic Year 2010-2011

Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt
Global Research Fellow
Sweden

Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt is Professor of European Law and Director of the Institute of European Law at the Faculty of Law of Stockholm University. She holds an LLM degree from Sofia University, Bulgaria, an LLM in International, European and Comparative Law from the European University Institute (EUI), Florence and a doctorate in private law from the Faculty of Law of Stockholm University (2003). Earlier appointments include the position of Deputy Secretary of the Committee of Legal Affairs and Human Rights at the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, Strasbourg (1994-1995), and Senior Lecturer at Örebro University (2005-2007). She has been Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law, Munich, and a Jean Monnet and STINT Fellow at the EUI, Florence (2005/2006).

Antonina has numerous publications in the area of European and comparative consumer law, competition law and intellectual property law. Her PhD thesis "Fair Trading Law in Flux?" analyzed the institutional legacies of Swedish and German commercial practices law and the differential impact of European integration on this area of law and regulation. Subsequent publications were devoted to the eastward enlargement of the European Union and its role for market and institutional reform in the accession countries from Central and Eastern Europe. More recent research projects and publications have addressed the choice between public and private enforcement in consumer law, theoretical and methodological aspects of comparative law (co-editor of New Directions in Comparative Law with Edward Elgar, 2010), as well as European and global governance of intellectual property rights. At the NYU she will work on a project approaching European copyright law from an institutional perspective that focuses on actor participation and institutional design

 

Andreas Heinemann

Senior Global Research Fellow

Switzerland


Andreas Heinemann is Professor of Commercial, Economic and European Law at the University of Zurich and Permanent Visiting Professor at the University of Lausanne. After having studied economics and law he participated at the 'Cycle International' of the Ecole Nationale d'Administration in Paris. He passed his bar exam in Berlin and received his PhD in Law and his habilitation (postdoctoral qualification) from the Faculty of Law of the University of Munich. He is member of the board of the Europa Institute Zurich, of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center (MIPLC) and of the Antitrust Committee of the German Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property (GRUR). The focus of his research lies on European and International Economic law with special interest in antitrust and intellectual property law. Recent publications deal with the private enforcement of competition law (Co-Editor of the project 'The Enforcement of Competition Law in Europe' within the Trento Project on the Common Core of European Private Law, and consultant to the Swiss Government), the European Internal Market, cartel procedure, the role of intellectual property rights in merger control and generally the particularities of the IT sector. At NYU, he will work on the public control of cross-border M&A between the poles of protectionism and legitimate regulation.

 

Christian Hofmann
Global Research Fellow
Germany

Christian Hofmann received his “Habilitation” (postdoctoral degree qualifying to lecture at law schools) from Humboldt University to Berlin in 2009, his PhD and his LLM from Martin Luther University Halle/Wittenberg in 2000 and his law degree from the University of Freiburg in 1998. In 2009 and 2010 he was a visiting professor at Goethe University in Frankfurt, at the University of Cologne and at Vilnius University (Lithuania). He worked as an assistant professor from 2004-2006 and again from 2008 to 2009 at Humboldt University to Berlin and was at the same time the assistant editor of the European law journal “European Review of Contract Law”. From 2002 to 2004 he was a research and teaching assistant at the University of Saarbruecken and from 2000 to 2002 a judicial clerk at the district court of Saarbruecken. From 2006 to 2008 he focused on US law as a visiting scholar and Humboldt Fellow at UC Berkeley (Boalt Hall). His main research interest is in Company Law, Banking Law and Securities Regulation, Contract Law, Antitrust Law and European Law. He published a book on cashless payment systems, and his second book on company law is in print. He has published numerous papers in various German and European law journals and contributed to several books.

 

Tsvi Kahana

Global Research Fellow
Israel

Tsvi Kahana is an Associate Professor of Law at Queen?s University in Kingston, Ontario. His research areas include legislative studies, constitutional theory, and comparative constitutional law, and he has published and taught in these areas. He is the co-editior of The Least Examined Branch: Legislature in The Constitutional State (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and Feminist Constitutionalism (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming). At NYU, he will be working on a project examining the constitutional performance of Canadian legislatures in relation to various constitutional matters. Professor Kahana received his doctorate from the University of Toronto. Prior to assuming his current position at Queen?s University, he taught or held research appointments at the University of Alberta, Tel Aviv University, the University of Toronto and Yale University.

 

Rafael Leal-Arcas

Global Research Fellow

United Kingdom

Dr Rafael Leal-Arcas is a senior lecturer in International Economic Law and European Union Law, Queen Mary University of London (Centre for Commercial Law Studies), United Kingdom. Author of more than 60 publications on international trade law, WTO law, international investment law, international environmental law, and EU law. Among his publications are the books International Trade and Investment Law: Multilateral, Regional and Bilateral Governance (Edward Elgar, 2010) and Theory and Practice of EC External Trade Law and Policy (Cameron May, 2008). For electronic access to some of his publications, see http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=327976

Member of the Madrid Bar, he has been a Visiting Scholar at Georgetown University Law Center, Fellow at Georgetown’s Institute of International Economic Law, Fellow at the American Society of International Law, Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, Visiting Doctoral Researcher at New York University School of Law, Fellow at the Australian National University, and Visiting Scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School. Dr Leal-Arcas completed his graduate legal education at Stanford, Columbia, the London School of Economics, and the European University Institute, Florence, Italy.

 

Ola Mestad
Senior Global Research Fellow
Norway

Ola Mestad has been Professor of law at the University of Oslo, Norway, since 2000. He works mainly in contract law, oil and gas law, international economic law, company law, legal history and legal method. For ten years he was in private practice as a lawyer and partner of the law firm Bugge, Arentz-Hansen & Rasmussen (BA-HR) in Oslo. i.a. as head of the oil and gas law group of the firm. Previously, he has been research fellow at Leopold-Wenger –Institut fur Rechtsgeschichte at the University of Munich and Recruitment Professor at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Since its inception in 2004 he has been a member of the Council on Ethics for the Norwegian Government Pension Fund – Global, see http://www.regjeringen.no/en/sub/styrer-rad-utvalg/ethics_council.html?id=434879. The Fund is a government owned investment vehicle with a capital of app. USD 430 Billion. This is part of the background for the research that he wants to do at NYU on Emerging regimes governing multinational corporations and other related corporate law issues. Mestad is one of the editors of Corporate Complicity in Human Rights Violations (with Gro Nystuen & Andreas Follesdal), forthcoming, Cambridge UP, 2011.

Mestad is also an ad hoc judge at the EFTA Court in Luxembourg and Member of the Panel of Conciliators, International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), Washington, DC. He chairs the National Research Committee for the Bicentennial of the Norwegian Constitution in 2014 and has recently been appointed as a leader (together with Professor Dag Michalsen) of an international research group on The Transformation of International Law and Norwegian Sovereignty in 1814 the at Centre for Advanced Study in Oslo for the academic year 2012-2013. More information: http://www.jus.uio.no/nifs/personer/vit/olame/

 

Federico Mucciarelli
Global Research Fellow
Italy


Federico M. Mucciarelli is tenured associate professor of business law at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy), where he teaches general business law and advanced company law. After graduating in law at the University of Bologna (1996), he obtained a LLM from the University of Heidelberg (2001) and a doctorate in business law at the University of Brescia (2003). After his doctorate he was appointed as research fellow (2003 – 2005) and then as assistant professor of business law (2005 – 2007) at the economics faculty of the University of Bologna (Italy). During his academic career, he spent several research periods in European universities: during 2002 he was Visiting Scholar at the law faculty of the University of Oxford (UK), in 2003 and 2006 he was visiting fellow at the Max-Planck Institut für Privatrecht of Hamburg (Germany), sponsored by the Max-Planck Society, and during 2007 he was Academic Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies (IALS), London (UK), sponsored by the University of Bologna. He lectured and held presentations in several Universities, such as Bologna, Trento, Tirana and Oxford.Beside his academic activities, Federico Mucciarelli have had several job experiences: he worked at the Italian Central Bank (Banca d’Italia: 2000 – 2001), was legal advisor for the Lower House of the Italian Parliament (Camera dei Deputati: 2003 – 2005) and then he has been active as consultant for the Rome office of the law firm Shearman & Sterling. His main research areas are domestic and international topics of takeover regulation, corporate and insolvency law, companies’ freedom of establishment on the EU. He has written two books: the first one, on defensive measures against hostile takeover, was published in 2004, and the second one, on international mobility of corporation, is forthcoming in 2010. His research goal as NYU Global Research Scholar is to assess which is the optimal law-making body to regulate insolvencies in multi-jurisdictional or federal legal systems.



Christoph Paulus
Global Research Fellow
Germany

Christoph G. Paulus is professor of law at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin/Germany since 1994 – holding a chair for Civil Law, Civil Procedure Law, Insolvency Law and ancient Roman Law. Before that he was teaching i.a. at the university of Heidelberg and of Saarbrücken. He had studied law at the university of Munich and has done his LLM at the University of California in Berkeley. Being an expert primarily in insolvency law, Prof. Paulus has worked several times as a consultant of the IMF and of the World Bank. Moreover, since 2006, he worked as an adviser of the German delegation on the UNCITRAL insolvency law sessions.

 

Cesar Rodriguez-Garavito
Global Research Fellow
Colombia


César Rodríguez-Garavito is Associate Professor of Law and founding Director of the Program on Global Justice and Human Rights at the University of the Andes (Bogota, Colombia). He is a founding member of the Center for Law, Justice, and Society (Dejusticia) and an Affiliate Professor of the Law, Societies and Justice Program at the University of Washington.He holds a PhD and an M.S. (Sociology) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an MA from NYU’s Institute for Law and Society, an MA (Philosophy) from the National University of Colombia, and a J.D. from the University of the Andes. He is the author of numerous books and journal articles on law, globalization, human rights, and social movements. His recent books include The Global Expansion of the Rule of Law; Socio-Economic Rights: Justice, Politics and Economics in Latin America (coed.); Race, Racism and Human Rights in Colombia; Beyond Displacement: Human Rights, Public Policies and Forced Displacement in Colombia (ed.); and Law and Globalization from Below: Toward a Cosmopolitan Legality (coed.). His recently completed projects include a global study on the impact of judicial activism regarding socio-economic rights, a socio-legal analysis of the transnational movement for labor rights in the Americas, and a theoretical and empirical study on indigenous peoples’ right to prior consultation. He is currently undertaking a comparative study of the law and politics of intellectual property and access to medicines in Latin America (with Rochelle Dreyfuss).

 

Maxi Scherer
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Germany

Dr. Maxi Scherer is an international arbitration and litigation lawyer and Counsel in Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr’s Dispute Resolution team in London.  Her practice focuses on complex multi-jurisdictional disputes.  She is a member of the Paris bar and a solicitor (England and Wales).  She graduated from University of Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne, France, and University of Cologne, Germany, and obtained her PhD at the University of Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne with highest honors.

Dr. Scherer teaches International Arbitration and Litigation, International Private Law, European Civil Procedure and Comparative Law.  She is an adjunct professor at SciencesPo Law School Paris, Georgetown CLTS, University of Melbourne, Pepperdine Law School and University of Fribourg.  Previous teaching activities include Queen Mary University London, University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Business School ESCP-EAP Europe, University of Basel, University of Versailles and University of Paris 10 Nanterre.

Maxi Scherer was a scholar of the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstifung des Deutschen Volkes) and has been admitted as a member of the French Comity on Private International Law (Comité Français de Droit International Privé) and the French Comparative Law Society (Société de Législation Comparé). Dr. Scherer’s research focuses on conflicts of law, international arbitration and judgement issues.  She will examine the extraterritorial effect of judgments setting aside and recognizing international arbitral awards.  Due to the multiplication of global lawsuits and the enhanced risk of parallel litigation or arbitration proceedings it is important to clearly define the extraterritorial effect of judgments and awards rendered in an international context.

 

Josephine Van Zeben
Hauser Research Scholar
Netherlands

Josephine van Zeben is in the final stages of her PhD research at the University of Amsterdam under the supervision of Prof. Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci and Prof. Marc Pallemaerts. Her research uses law & economics methodology to consider the creation, implementation and enforcement of environmental regulation at different regulatory levels – global, regional and local – and the changing role of national governments in this context.

Before starting her PhD research, Josephine obtained a B.A. in Social Sciences from University College Utrecht (Hons.), an LL.B in Scots Law at the University of Edinburgh and an LL.M in European Private Law at the University of Amsterdam. During her studies, Josephine was a research assistant to several professors at the University of Amsterdam and preformed independent research for Oxford University. She was also a visiting researcher at the Economic Development Foundation (Iktisadi Kalkinma Vakfi) in Istanbul during the summer of 2008.

She also attended courses at the University Institute in Florence, the Gerzensee Institute in Florence and spent a semester studying at the University of Bologna. Since starting her PhD, she has published extensively in international journals, including the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, the Review of European Community & International Environmental Law and the Carbon & Climate Law Review.

During her stay at NYU Law School, Josephine will be conducting comparative research regarding federalized methods of enforcement, focussing on the United States and the European Union and their use of market-based regulatory instruments, specifically emission trading systems. Her sponsor at NYU is Prof. Richard Stewart.
 
 
Ingo Venzke
Hauser Research Scholar
Germany

Ingo Venzke is completing his PhD “On Words and Deeds. How the Practice of Legal Interpretation Develops International Norms” at the University of Frankfurt under the supervision of Armin von Bogdandy. His thesis builds on considerations of semantic pragmatism and it elucidates the agency of international actors in processes of communicative lawmaking. At NYU he will now focus on the power of international courts, on how their authority can be justified, and on how it may be dealt with in the interaction between different levels of governance.
 
Ingo has been a Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg and a Visiting Scholar at Tel Aviv University. He holds a LL.M. with distinction from the University of London (SOAS) and a B.A. in International Relations from the School of International Studies in Dresden. The German Academic Exchange Service also supports Ingo’s post-doctoral research.

 

Ralph Wilde
Senior Global Research Fellow
UK

Dr Ralph Wilde is a member of the Faculty of Laws at University College London, University of London. He works in the fields of international law and international relations, and his current research focuses on the administration of territory by international organizations and foreign states, the concept of trusteeship in international law and public policy, and the extraterritorial application of human rights norms. His book addressing the first two of these topics, International Territorial Administration: How Trusteeship and the Civilizing Mission Never Went Away was published by OUP in 2008 and won the Certificate of Merit (book prize) of the American Society of International Law in 2009. At the International Law Association (ILA) Ralph is a member of the international Executive Council and the International Committee on Human Rights Law, and serves as Rapporteur of the Study Group on UN Reform and Joint Honorary Secretary of the British Branch. He was formerly a member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law. More information: www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/wilde

 

Fuad Zarbiyev
Global Research Fellow
Azerbaijan

Fuad Zarbiev holds an LLM from Harvard Law School (2010), a Ph.D in International Law from the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva (2009), the Diploma of the Hague Academy of International Law (2002) and the Diploma on International and Comparative Human Rights Law from the International Institute of Human Rights in Strasbourg (2004). He is the author of various publications in international law journals and books on general international law, theory of international law and human rights. He worked for a number of international-law-related cases in Switzerland and before the European Court of Human Rights. He also served as Legal Advisor to the Costa Rican Government before the International Court of Justice in the Dispute regarding Navigational and Related Rights case. At NYU School of Law he will focus on « Judicial Activism in International Law.



Tal Zarsky
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Tal Zarsky is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Haifa - Faculty of Law. His research focuses on Information Privacy, Internet Policy, Telecommunications Law and Online Commerce, Reputation and Trust. He has also taught Contract and Property law. He has written and presented his work on these issues in a variety of forums, both in Israel and worldwide. In addition, he has advised various Israeli regulators and legislators on related issues. Dr. Zarsky is also a Fellow at the Information Society Project, at Yale Law School. He completed his doctorate dissertation, which focused on Data Mining in the Internet Society, at Columbia University - School of Law.

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Academic Year 2009-2010

 

Miriam Aziz
Global Emile Noel Fellow
United Kingdom

Miriam Aziz studied law at Manchester University (1989-1992). She then became a member of the Inner Temple and was called to the Bar of England & Wales in 1994 after which she completed a PhD on the Regulation of Human Experimentation in the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States at the Faculty of Law of the University of Edinburgh (1993-1997). She was a research assistant at the Faculty of Law of the Free University of Berlin from May 1995 until January 1996. She returned to Berlin in October 1997 after having completed her PhD and was based at the Department for Political and Social Sciences of the Free University of Berlin (at the Chair for Public Law and Politics at the Otto Suhr Institut) for three years where she conducted research on European Union and German Citizenship and Comparative Constitutional Law and Theory and also taught courses in both English and German on the Law of the European Union. She acted as chief co-ordinator for Professor U.K. Preuss for the Framework 5 project, 'European Citizenship and the Social and Political Integration of the European Union' (EURCIT) funded by the European Commission. She also worked as a legal consultant for a number of law firms in Berlin during this time. Her last engagement as a consultant for Coudert Schurmann's Berlin office in cases on European Community (EC) law and German law which have included some cases on EC citizenship and EC and German commercial law. She was awarded a Jean Monnet Fellowship (2000-2001) from the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (RSCAS) at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence and a Marie Curie Fellowship (2001-2003) from the European Commission to conduct research on the impact of EC law on the national legal orders and cultures of the member states which she documented in The Impact of European Rights on National Legal Cultures (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2004). She has published mainly in the areas of European Community law, German law and Medical law, concentrating primarily on constitutional issues in, among others, the European Law Journal, the Columbia Journal of European Law, European Public Law, the Medical Law Review, Medical Law International and Santé Publique. Between 2005 and 2009, she was an associate Professor in Public and Administrative Law at the Law Department of the University of Siena, Italy. During this time, she also taught courses on European Union Law at Cornell Law School and at Saint Louis University Law School. Miriam Aziz is also an accomplished musician and composer and is currently working on a research project on global law and the arts, which will be the focus of her Emile Noël fellowship at the Jean Monnet Center at New York University Law School (2009-2010).

 

 

Sadaf Aziz

Global Research Fellow
Pakistan

Bio Coming Soon
 

 

 

Maurizia De Bellis
Global Research Fellow
Italy


Maurizia De Bellis is tenured Assistant Professor in Administrative Law at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. She also teaches Administrative Sciences at the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. After graduating in Law cum laude (2002) at the University of Pisa, she received a Diploma in Law Studies (2003) from the Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa and went on to obtain a PhD in Law and Economics (2007) in University of Rome “La Sapienza”. In 2005 she has been Jemolo Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford University, and from 2006 to 2008 she has been research fellow at the University of Siena. In 2008, she obtained the Academy of European Public Law Diploma from the European Public Law Organization (EPLO). She is a Fellow of the Institute for Research on Public Administration (IRPA). From 2005 to 2008, she participated in a European research group on “The evolution of a polycentric administrative space”, within the Connex Network, Mannheim (Germany). She’s working on a book about global financial standards, near completion. She has written essays and articles on regulation of public services, with particular reference to energy and education. For the book Global Administrative Law: Cases, Materials, Issues (2nd edition, 2008), she wrote about international accounting and auditing standard setting, credit rating agencies and due process in WTO case law. Currently, her research interests focus on private regulation in the environmental field.

 

Paula Gaido

Global Research Fellow
Argentina

Paula Gaido is Assistant Professor at Cordoba University in Cordoba, Argentina. She obtained her LL.M in Fundamental Rights at Carlos III University in Madrid. She visited as researcher and visiting scholar Christian Albrecht University in Kiel, Germany, and Genova University, Italy, and Columbia University. She has edited three books: La pretensión de corrección del derecho. La polémica Bulygin/Alexy sobre la relación entre derecho y moral, Externado University, Bogotá, 2001; Relevancia normativa en la justificación de las decisiones judiciales. El debate Bayón/Rodríguez sobre la derrotabilidad de normas jurídicas, Externado University, Bogotá, 2003; Una discusión sobre la teoría del derecho: Joseph Raz, Robert Alexy, Eugenio Bulygin, Marcial Pons, Madrid, 2007. She has translated into Spanish articles by Robert Alexy, Joseph Raz and Brian Bix. At the end of 2008 she concluded the writing of her doctoral thesis, entitled “Law’s Normative Claim. A Conceptual Debate”, at Cordoba University. In this work, she explores and criticizes the answers given by Robert Alexy and Joseph Raz to the question about the normativity of law, and evaluates the insight of their philosophical approaches. Her research activity at NYU will be focused on the study of the impact of these different conceptions of law on recent human right cases. Her main purpose is to re-examine the underlying rationality of these decisions, and critically evaluate their legal character.

 

Asem Khalil
Global Research Fellow
Palestine


Asem Khalil, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Public Law. He teaches at the Faculty of Law and Public Administration (BA and Master Programs) and at the Master Program in Democracy and Human Rights, in Birzeit University, in the West Bank - occupied Palestinian territory. He also teaches at the Master Program in International Cooperation and Development in Bethlehem University. He is member of the network of experts in the Euro-Mediterranean Consortium for Applied Research on International Migration, at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Dr. Khalil received his doctorate (PhD) in Public Law from the University of Fribourg (Switzerland), Dottorato in Utroque Iure (Lateran University, Rome) and Master in Public Administration (National School of Administration, France). Dr. Khalil was the main researcher and supervisor of several research projects and published several books, Reports and Articles in English, Arabic, French and Italian, covering the following topics: constitutional law, constituent power, Palestinian constitutional development, Palestinian refugees, migration law in Palestine, Palestinian nationality, security sector reform, legal protection of women, and methodology of legal research.

 

Wolfgang Kerber
Senior Global Research Fellow
Germany

Wolfgang Kerber is a professor of economics and holds the chair of Economic Policy at the Department of Business Administration and Economics at Philipps-University Marburg, Germany. After receiving his PhD at the University Erlangen-Nürnberg, he was director at the Walter-Eucken-Institut in Freiburg and professor of economics at the Ruhr-University Bochum. He was a visiting fellow at George Mason University (Fairfax), University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), and the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). His general research interests are competition policy, evolutionary and innovation economics, institutional economics, law and economics, and European integration. In the last years his main fields of research are (1) European and international competition policy and (2) multi-level legal systems and regulatory competition. He has written extensively in both German and English. His most recent publications include articles in European Journal of Law and EconomicsWorld Competition, and Journal of Competition Law and Economics.

 

Richard Macrory
Senior Global Research Fellow
United Kingdom

Richard Macrory is one of the most distinguished and experienced environmental lawyers in Europe , who has pioneered the development of the subject in the United Kingdom. He was a founding member and the first chairman of the UK Environmental Law Association in 1989, now the country’s leading environmental law group spanning both practitioners and academics. He was the first editor of the Journal of Environmental Law (Oxford University Press), a post he continued for almost twenty years. In 1991 he was appointed the UK’s first professor of environmental law, and in 2008 was awarded an Hon. Q.C. for his contribution to the development of environmental law.
Professor Macrory read law at Oxford and qualified as a barrister in 1974. For a number of years he was the London in-house lawyer for Friends of the Earth Ltd before moving to Imperial College of Science and Technology where he worked with environmental scientists to develop interdisciplinary research and teaching in the field of the environment. He was professor of law and director of the Environmental Change Unit, Oxford University 1994-5, and in 1999 moved to his current position at University College, where he is professor of environmental law and director of the Centre for Law and the Environment within the Law Faculty.

 

Conrado Mendes
Hauser Research Scholar
Brazil

Conrado Hübner Mendes is a lecturer (on leave) at the Law School of Getulio Vargas Foundation, São Paulo. He received a Master (cum laude) and a PhD (cum laude) in political science from the University of São Paulo and is now a PhD candidate in legal theory at the University of Edinburgh. He participated, from 2002 to 2004, of the research team that helped to launch the Law School of Getulio Vargas Foundation in São Paulo, and had been the Coordinator of Teaching Methodology in 2005 and 2006. His research is mainly focused on theories of rights, democracy and constitutionalism. His new PhD thesis tries to develop normative standards to assess the deliberative quality of constitutional courts.

 

Moran Ofir
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Moran Ofir is a PhD candidate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Rationality in its program for outstanding students. Moran holds both an LLB degree from the Hebrew University’s Law School, where she graduated magna cum laude, and an MBA in Finance from the Hebrew University, where she graduated summa cum laude and ranked first among all MBA honors students. Moran is completing her PhD in Law and Finance under the co-direction of Professor Uriel Procaccia and Professor Zvi Wiener. Her dissertation deals with “Investment in Financial Structured Products from a Rational Choice Perspective”. Moran’s main research interests are in Law and Finance, Law and Economics, Behavioral Finance, Corporate Law and Securities Law. Moran received several awards and scholarships, including the Kahneman Fellowship for outstanding doctoral students at the Center for Rationality. Moran is a lecturer in Introduction to Finance and Legal Aspects of Corporate Finance at The Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

Martins Paparinskis
Hauser Research Scholar
Latvia
 

Martins Paparinskis, LL B (University of Latvia) (2004), M Jur (Dist) (Oxon) (2005), M Phil (Dist) (Oxon) (2006) is a D Phil candidate at the Queen’s College, University of Oxford. While in Oxford, he has been a Chevening Scholar, Clifford Chance Prize winner, Freshfields Bruchaus Deringer Scholar and Commercial Bar Scholar (twice). Martins is finishing his thesis on the customary minimum standard of investment protection law, discussing the historical development, sources aspects and comparative arguments in investment protection law. He has been a Graduate Teaching Assistant in Public International Law and International Economic Law at the University of Oxford. His research concentrates on investment protection law, particularly in the broader context of sources of law, treaty interpretation, State responsibility and international dispute settlement. Martins has published and spoken in conferences about investment protection law. As a Hauser Scholar, Martins will research the operation of systemic integration in investment protection law.

 

Vlad Perju
Global Research Fellow
Romania

Vlad Perju is an assistant professor at Boston College Law School. He received his legal education in Europe and the United States. He has a law degree from the University of Bucharest (Romania), a maîtrise in European Law from the Sorbonne, and an LLM summa cum laude from the European Academy of Legal Theory (Brussels). He attended the LLM program at Harvard Law School and received a doctoral degree (S.J.D.) from Harvard in 2007 for a dissertation titled “The Province of Cosmopolitan Jurisprudence: Constitutional Foundations”. He is currently at work to turn the dissertation into a book. At Harvard, he served as a Byse Fellow, a Safra graduate fellow in ethics and a fellow in the Program on Justice, Welfare and Economics. At Boston College, he teaches in the areas of European law, American and comparative constitutional law and legal theory. He currently serves as the professor of theory of the state at the European Academy of Legal Theory. Perju was appointed by the President of Romania to an advisory commission on constitutional reform.
Perju has published in the areas of comparative constitutional law, legal theory and EU law. His latest article, “Reason and Authority in the European Court of Justice”, was published in the Virginia Journal of International Law in 2009. He is currently working on a number of
projects: a comparative study of disability rights in the US, EU and the UN; a project that uses Amartya Sen’s work on positional objectivity to conceptualize the judicial standpoint in proportionality analysis in constitutional law; and a critique of binary approaches to legitimacy in political liberalism.



Mira Sundara Rajan
Global Research Fellow
Canada

Dr. Mira T. Sundara Rajan, DPhil (Oxon), currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Intellectual Property Law, and is a tenured Associate Professor of Law at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. She received her law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, and her undergraduate degrees from McGill University and the University of Paris (X). She moved back to Canada in 2004 after 5 years of research and teaching in the UK, at the Universities of Oxford and London.
Mira has been a Visiting Professor at law schools in India, Italy, Canada, and the United States. She acts as a consultant on copyright and law reform matters around the world, including countries such as India, Russia, Japan, and Hungary. Mira has published a book exploring a human rights model of copyright law - Copyright and Creative Freedom: A Study of Post-Socialist Law Reform (Routledge 2006) - and she has been appointed Editor of an Oxford University Press Series - Intellectual Property: Eastern Europe and the CIS (2008-). Mira has a special interest in the attribution and integrity aspects of authors’ rights in their work, known as “moral rights.” Her work has helped to pioneer recognition for moral rights as human rights, shaping a seminal Indian case establishing the responsibility of the Indian government for protecting works of culture in its care, Amar Nath Sehgal v Union of India (Delhi High Court, 2005). Mira is actively involved in representing the rights and interests of creators. She has written a policy on totem poles for the British Columbia municipality of Duncan, and has advised leading representatives of South Indian Carnatic (classical) music, Inuit intellectual property, and the literary legacies of classic European authors. She is currently at work on a new book in this area, Moral Rights and New Technology, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2010. The project deals with the moral rights implications of digital phenomena from music downloading to the copyright protection of software, and includes a unique exploration of the legal issues surrounding the digitization of museum collections which has grown out of a collaboration with the Pitt Rivers Museum at the University of Oxford. Mira’s interest in copyright is part of her family history. She is a great-granddaughter of Indian National Poet, C Subramania Bharati (1882-1921), whose copyright was purchased by the Indian government and given as a gift to the people of India in 1949.

 

Antonello Tancredi
Global Emile Noel Fellow
Italy

Antonello Tancredi is a Full Professor of International Law in the School of Law of the University of Palermo. Since 2002, he has been scientific co-ordinator of the PhD Programme in EC Law, Department of Public Law, University of Palermo. He holds a PhD in International Law from the University of Napoli “Federico II”. Before joining the School of Law in Palermo, he worked at the University of Trento and Roma “La Sapienza”. He was several times a visiting researcher at the Max Planck Institut, Heidelberg, Germany and was invited, inter alia, to deliver a training course on WTO law at the Chinese National School of Administration, in Beijing (April 2006).
His research interests covers generally public international law and its relationship to EU law. His current research focuses on the denial of direct effect to the WTO law in the EC legal system as a matter of institutional balancing.



Tetsuya Watanabe
Global Research Fellow

Japan

Dr. Watanabe is currently a Professor at the Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, where he has been since 2003. He received a doctoral certificate from Kyoto University in 1995 and became Ph. D candidate. He received a PhD from Kyoto University in 2000. He also received an LL.M from Fukuoka University in 1989 and an LL.B from Kyushu University in 1987. Professor Watanabe teaches in the areas of Tax law (Basic Income Taxation, Corporate Taxation and International Taxation as well as other fields of public and constitutional law). His principal research interests are in comparative corporate tax law and tax avoidance (especially in M&A transactions including international aspects) with a focus on US and UK law. He has published numerous articles and papers on this topic. He is also the author of two monographs and co-author of two famous text books. Professor Watanabe was a Visiting Scholar at U.C. Berkeley School of Law (Boalt) in 1998-1999 and at Harvard Law School in 1999-2000. He was a Visiting Professor at University of Munich in 2007 and National University of Singapore (Asian Law Institute) in 2009. He also teaches in Duke University Law School Summer Program (at Hong Kong) in 2009. Professor Watanabe is a board member of the Japan Tax Jurisprudence Association and the Japanese Society for Tax Law. He is a research member of various non-profitable organizations, such as the Japan Tax Research Institute. He is also a member of several important governmental tax committees in Japan, at the Ministry of Finance (MOF), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC).Professor Watanabe is a Fulbright Scholar in 2009-2010 academic year.



Siobhan Wills
Global Research Fellow
Ireland

Dr Siobhán Wills is a lecturer in law at University College Cork, Ireland and is also on the Executive Board of the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, which is based in the law department. Her field of research is International Humanitarian Law. Her current research focuses on the consequences for ‘protected persons’ of a change in the nature of a an armed conflict from international to non-international. She is also exploring the progress and implications of Security Council Resolution 1325 on the protection of women in armed conflict, which has its tenth anniversary in 2010. She has written a book Protecting Civilians: The Obligations of Peacekeepers which was published by Oxford University Press in March 2009.

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Academic Year 2008-2009

 

Nehal Bhuta
Hauser Research Scholar
Canada
 

Nehal Bhuta , BA 1999 (Melbourne), LLB 1999 (Hons) (Melbourne), MA 2004 (Poli. Sci., New School for Social Research), LLM 2005 (NYU), is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Toronto. He has previously worked with the International Justice Program of Human Rights Watch and as a consultant for the International Center for Transitional Justice in New York. His areas of interest are human rights law, humanitarian law, political theory and political economy. He is admitted to practice in Victoria, Australia, and has worked as a clerk in the Federal Court of Australia.

As a Hauser Research Scholar, he will be working on a book manuscript under contract for Columbia University Press, entitled "Between Power and Principle: International Law and Politics after Iraq". He will consider the extent to which the Iraq war and certain aspects of its aftermath may be considered a crucible for certain tensions and contradictory developments in the international legal order after 1989.

 

Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Argentina

Dr. Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky began his career in the private sector as attorney and legal consultant. At this time he also started contributing to NGOs like the Open Society Institute and Proconsumer. Since 2005 he has been working for the Argentina state. He played a leading role in the nationalization of the Buenos Aires water company (AySA), of which he was consequently appointed managing director representing the federal government. He was rapporteur of the Argentinean judge in the arbitral case “Impregilo v. Ente Binacional Yacyretá” in the International Chamber of Commerce, and later became the institutional coordinator of the defendant in this case. He is now working as a consultant to the National Defense Minister of his country.

Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky has a Bachelor in law from the National University of Comahue (Río Negro, Patagonia, 1999) and an LL.M. in Corporate law from the Austral University (Buenos Aires, 2002). He received his Ph.D. Summa Cum Laude in “Legal and Economic Aspects of Corruption” at the University of Salamanca (Spain, 2007), and a European Doctorate after conducting his doctoral research at the Economic Department of the University of Vienna (2004/5). In his Ph.D. thesis Dr. Bohoslavsky focused on sovereign insolvency and abusive loans. He published several papers in refereed journals and in newspapers in Latin America and the US related to sovereign insolvency, foreign investments and international arbitration. He authored the forthcoming book Abusive Loans - Overindebtness of states, companies and consumers.
At NYU he is working on institutional tools to implement the legal principle that creditors should adopt prudent and sound behavior when lending to sovereign debtors.  He explores furthermore the relation of this principle with the odious debt doctrine and with collective action clauses.

 

Tillman Braun
Global Fellow from Government
Germany

Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, ‘North Africa, Near and Middle East’, Directorate-General for External Economic Policy, Berlin, Germany

Previously, at the Directorates-General for Economic Policy, for External Economic Policy and for Political Co-ordination, Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Technology; at the Coordination Unit (Economic and External Economic Policy), Federal Foreign Office, Berlin; Personal Assistant to the Special Representative of the German Chancellor for negotiations on compensation to former forced laborers, Count Lambsdorff, Bonn, Berlin, Washington, USA; Adviser to a Parliamentary Group in the German Bundestag.

First State Exam in Law [J.D. equivalent], Heidelberg University, as a scholar of the German National Scholarship Merit Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and Second State Exam in Law [Bar exam equivalent], Higher Regional Court Munich; Master of Public Administration, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; Dr. iur., University of Cologne (‘summa cum laude’).

The result of his research as a Global Fellow from Government and Deutsches Haus Visiting Scholar at New York University School of Law, New York, has been published as “Braun, Globalization-driven Innovation: The Investor as a Partial Subject in Public International Law – An Inquiry into the Nature and Limits of Investor Rights –“, Jean Monnet Working Paper 04/13 (2013), New York University School of Law, New York.

Publications in International Investment Law and International Economic LawLecturer on European and International Investment Law, Humboldt-University, Berlin, and University of Cologne, Germany.

 

Iris Canor
Global Emile Noel Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Iris Canor received her LLB from Tel-Aviv University (Israel), her LLM from the College of Europe (Brugge, Belgium) and a Doctorate in law from the Europa-Institute (University of Saarland, Germany). She also held visiting positions at the Max-Planck Institute of Public International Law, Heidelberg (Germany), and Columbia Law School. She is currently teaching at the College of Management Law School in Israel and at the Europa-Institute in the University of Saarland, Germany. In addition she is a member of the executive committee of Concord (Research Center for Integration of International Law in Israel). Her fields of research and teaching include European law, human rights, public international law and private international law with a special emphasis on the interplay between public international law and private international law. She published inter alia on institutional aspects of European law, on questions of sovereignty and occupation, on diplomatic protection and the right to citizenship, and on theories of private international law.



Dr. Jose Luis Diez-Ripollés
Global Research Fellow
Spain

Professor Dr.Díez-Ripollés is a full time Professor of Criminal Law at Málaga University in Spain, and Head of the Andalusian Institute of Criminology. He teaches courses on criminal Law. general part., particular crimes, and criminal justice policy. His publications comprise a wide range of topics, from criminal justice policy issues -such as the consolidation of the law and order approach in different countries, or cross-national comparisons on the criminal law-making process-, and criminology –such as urban planning corruption practices or drug offences prosecution enforcement-, to foundations of criminal law –e.g. methodological foundations of subjective elements of crime-, and particular crimes –mainly, drug offences, money laundering, assisted suicide and euthanasia or crimes against minors' safety. He has also published legal commentaries and handbooks on criminal law. general part, and particular crimes. He has taught and/or conducted research as Visiting Professor at the Universities of Freiburg, Switzerland and Mainz, Germany, and as Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley. His research activity at NYU will be focused on “Criminal Justice Policy in Western Europe: The influence of the USA and Nordic European Criminal Justice Policy Approaches”.

 

Benjamin Geva
Senior Global Research Fellow
Canada

Dr. Benjamin Geva is a Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He specializes in commercial, financial and banking law, particularly in payment and credit instruments, electronic banking and the regulation of the payment system. He obtained his LLB (cum laude) at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1970) and his LLM and S.J.D. at Harvard. He held visiting positions, in the United States, at the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois, the University of Utah and Northwestern University as well as taught in the summer program of Duke university in Hong Kong; in Israel at Tel Aviv University; in Australia in Monash, Deakin and Melbourne Universities; and in France at the faculté de droit et de science politique d'Aix-Marseille. He was a Visitor at the law faculties of Oxford and Cambridge Universities in England and at Max-Planck Institute for Comparative and Private International Law, Hamburg, Germany. He practised with Blake, Cassels and Graydon in Toronto and under the IMF technical assistance program, has advised and drafted key financial sector legislation for the authorities of several countries, particularly, on missions for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Haiti, Yugoslavia, Cambodia, Afghanistan, Timor-Leste, and Sri Lanka. In Canada he has been on legislative drafting working groups in the areas of personal property security, securities transfers, and standby credits & independent guarantees. He has been on the Osgoode faculty since 1977. He is the founding editor in chief of the Banking and Finance Law Review (BFLR) and has written extensively in his areas of expertise, including a monograph on Financing Consumer Sales and Product Defences in Canada and the US (Toronto: Carswell, 1984), a treatise on the Law of Electronic Funds Transfer (New York: Matthew Bender, 1992, with annual updates with contributors to 2007) and a comparative law text on Bank Collections and Payment Transactions (Oxford: OUP, 2001). He is a member of various professional domestic and overseas committees and institutions involved in research and law reform. His current research is on the legal history of the payment order, negotiable instruments and funds transfers, and payment and settlement systems.

 

Joel González
Global Research Fellow
Chile

Joel González is a Professor of Law at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile where he teaches courses on Tort Law and Civil Law. He holds a JD from Universidad de Concepción Law School (Chile). He has also received an LLM in European Union Law from Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), and LL.M in Bussiness Law from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. He is the author of several books: “Comfort Letters” (LexisNexis Press, 2002), “Limited Liability Sole Proprietorship” (LexisNexis Press, 2003), “Chilean Index of Private Law” (Editorial Jurídica de Chile, 2006). He has published numerous articles in specialized journals. In addition to his academic duties, Professor González is a practicing attorney-at-law in civil and commercial cases.
While in residency at NYU, his research will focus on Products Liability.

 

Dr. Xiuli Han
Global Research Fellow
China

Dr. Xiuli Han received her LL.D. from Xiamen University in international law, P.R.C., in September of 2006. Because of her excellent performance during her PhD candidate studies, in July 2006 she became one of the faculty members at the Law School of Xiamen University. Currently, Dr Han is an Assistant Professor of International Law as well as a member of the Society of International Economic Law of China and the Society of International Law of China. She is also the editor of Chinese Journal of International Economic Law and a part-time attorney at the United Xinshi Law Firm in Xiamen City. Dr Han’s academic area focuses on international economic law and international environmental law. Within the field of international economic law she has published one monograph: "The Principle of Proportionality in WTO", and more than forty articles and book chapters, including articles in theChinese Journal of International Law and James Cook University Law Review, and translated the famous book "General Principles of Law as Applied by International Courts" and "Tribunals" written by Professor Bin Cheng. She won the research project entrusted by the Ministry of Justice of China in 2007. Dr Han’s recent interest is international environmental law issues. As a global research fellow at the NYU Law School, her research proposal is entitled “International Dispute Settlement Bodies and Environmental Protection from a Chinese Lawyer’s Perspective”.

 

Koichi Inamori
Japanese Federation Bar Association Fellow
Japan

Koichi Inamori has devoated a significant portion of his career to international human rights law, with a specific research interest in the interface of international and domestic law and how mechanisms for treaty enforcement can play a role in introducing international norms of human rights into domestic jurisprudence. His efforts have not been solely devoted to academics, as he has taken an active part in promotiong human rights, both at home and abroad, through various committees of his local bar association, the Aichi Bar Association, as well as with various committees of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA).
Moreover, his past research activities as a graduate student and active membership in various human rights committees of the JFBA and the Aichi Bar Association place him in a strong position to the advancement of research in international human rights law, as well as to the learning environment of his future classmates.

 

Tally Kritzman
Hauser Research Scholar
Israel
 

Tally Kritzman will receive her PhD from Tel Aviv University School of Law's direct PhD Program. Her thesis was written on socio-economic refugees under the Supervision of Eyal Benvenisti. She completed her LLB (Cum Laude) at the Tel Aviv University School of Law.

Tally's main research and teaching interests are refugee law, immigrants rights and international human rights. She has taught at the Tel Aviv University School of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the Ramat Gan College. She has also been a part of the Refugee Rights Clinic in Tel Aviv.

Tally was a Fox International Fellow at the Yale Macmillan Center in the academic year of 2006-7, and received the Fulbright Doctoral Researchers Fellowship for that year. Tally also received the Yad Hanadiv Foundation Fellowship for her post-doctoral studies in NYU.

Tally worked as a clerk for the Deputy President of the Israeli Supreme Court Mishael Cheshin (retired), and has been a member of the Israeli bar since 2004.

 

Jacob Nussim
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Jacob Nussim is an assistant professor of law at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, where he teaches courses on tax (income taxation, VAT, corporate taxation, tax policy), law and economics, regulations, and microeconomics. Dr. Nussim holds a BA (econ.) magna cum laude, LL.B and LLM magna cum laude from Tel-Aviv University (Israel) and LLM and J.S.D. from the University of Chicago.Dr. Nussim’s main research interest is in the fields of tax and law and economics, and he has published articles in various journals such as the Yale law review, Virginia tax law review, International review of law and economics, Supreme Court economic review, European journal of law and economics, Review of law and economics. Dr. Nussim was a visiting professor at UCLA during the fall semester of 2008 and joined the Hauser global program for the spring semester of 2009.

 

Ms. Adriana Opromolla
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Italy

Ms. Opromolla is currently employed as Social Policy Officer at Caritas Europa.  However, her professional experiences also include serving as a lawyer at both the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance and the European Court of Human Rights. In addition, she has worked on the Advisory Panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion and Beliefs (assisting the Italian Director) and has served as the delegated expert for the Holy See in the Ad Hoc Committee on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings of the Council of Europe drafting the Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings. Ms. Opromolla’s proposal entitled "Enhancing Labour Rights in a Globalized World: Finding Solutions through a Comparative Transatlantic Perspective" will examine the impact of global trade on human rights, in particular of the WTO rules on Labor law and social standards. Within this context, Ms. Opromolla intends to carry out comparative research between the different legal arguments defended by the EU and the US.  Ms. Opromolla holds an LL.M. from the University of Geneva and recently began her Ph.D. studies at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium.  During her residency, Ms. Opromolla will be affiliated with the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice.

 

Frank Hogholm Pedersen
Global Fellow from Practice & Government
Denmark

Frank Pedersen is a tax scholar and futurist. Combining an exhaustive understanding of the fundamentals of income taxation with a profound knowledge of the development of western societies, he works with the conceptual understanding and modernization of income tax systems.

Dr. Pedersen holds a position as a senior consultant at the Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies, one of Scandinavia’s leading non-partisan think tanks. He is a sought-after speaker for authorities and companies, with customers such as The Danish Commerce and Companies Agency, The City of Copenhagen and Nokia. Previously he was director of the unit for tax simplification at the Danish Ministry of Taxation, a unit working directly for the minister of taxation and which managed to reduce the administrative burdens for Danish business with 10 pct. during its first 3 years of work under the leadership of Dr. Pedersen.

Frank Pedersen earned his Master’s and PhD degrees in law at Aarhus University, Denmark. In addition, he has studied sociology at The Humboldt University in Berlin. From 1997-98, he was a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School. His dissertation is published with the title “Tax Aversion – a Sociology of Law and Tax Policy Analysis”.

Dr. Pedersen is currently working on a research project analyzing income tax systems using the newest social science theories in the field of ‘complex systems’. An aim is to enhance the value of the tax-simplification literature for both practitioner and tax theorist. The literature needs to better include developments in technology and to embrace the necessity for tax systems to be able to function in more complex and shifting environments. Dr. Pedersen will be affiliated with the Tax Program.

 

Mario Savino
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
Italy

Dr. Mario Savino is associate professor of administrative law in the Tuscia University of Viterbo (Italy). He also teaches European administrative law in the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, where he got a law degree with honours (1999) and a doctorate in administrative law (2004).
He has been UE Law Poros Chair Professor at National Law School of India University, Bangalore (2005) and Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow at NYU School of Law, New York (2006). He has been team-leader of a European research group on "The evolution of a polycentric administrative space," within the Connex Network, Mannheim (Germany), from 2005 to 2008.
He is member of the European Group of Public Law (since 2007) and of the Italian Aspen Institute (since 2008).
He has published a book on the EU committee system (I comitati dell’Unione europea, Milano, Giuffrè, 2005, 572 pp.), and has written essays and articles on topics related to Italian, European and global administrative law. Currently, his main research interests concern public security and the protection of aliens’ rights, with specific reference to the fields of immigration and terrorism.

 

Yehuda Septimus
Gruss Scholar in Residence
USA

Yehuda Septimus is a doctoral candidate in Religious Studies at Yale University.Yehuda Septimus received his doctorate in Religious Studies at Yale University. He is currently working on a book entitled, "On the Boundaries of Prayer: Rabbinic Ritual Texts with Addressees Other Than God", which examines the rhetorical, ritual, and definitional limits of rabbinic prayer based on ritual recitations preserved in talmudic texts addressed to non-divine beings such as humans and angels. He received a BA in English Literature from Yeshiva University, an MA in Classical Jewish History and Literature from Yale University, and rabbinic ordination from Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. His research interests include Jewish Law; Talmud and Midrash; Jewish Ritual and Synagogue Culture; and the intersection of early Christianity and Judaism.

 

Filippo Valguarnera
Global Research Fellow
Italy

Filippo Valguarnera (born 1977) has earned a law degree (summa cum laude) and a PhD in Comparative Law at the University of Florence, Italy. Since 2007, Dr. Valguarnera has been a research fellow in Comparative Law at the same university, where he also teaches Comparative Legal Systems at the Faculty of Economics. During the academic year 2007-08, Dr. Valguarnera has taught European Law at New York University's Florence Center, in the Political Science program. He has also worked as a research fellow at the University of Uppsala (Sweden), pursuing a research funded by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency on the right of the public to access private land (the so called “allemansrätt”).

His main research interests concern access to justice, with particular reference to class action, as well as land ownership, with particular reference to the access of the public on privately owned land.

His research proposal is entitled “Opt-in or opt-out? A comparative study” and deals with the legal and cultural factors that prevent the European legislators from a generalized adoption of the opt-out system for the determination of the class in class action lawsuits.

 

Raphael Van Steenberghe
Global Research Fellow
Belgium

Dr. Raphaël van Steenberghe received his PhD in Law from the University of Louvain (Belgium, 2008). He also holds an LLM in International Law from the University of Cambridge (UK, 2004) and a BA and MA in Law (2001) as well as in Philosophy (2002) from the University of Louvain.

His doctoral research considers the matter of Self-Defence in Public International Law. Dr. Raphaël van Steenberghe is also the author of various articles in the Revue générale de droit international public (RGDIP) or the Revue belge de droit international (RBDI) on questions pertaining to use of force between States. He contributed to the third edition of the commentary of the United Nations Charter as well. He was a correspondent for the Bulletin of Legal Developments published by the British Institute for International and Comparative Law. He was also involved in research on criminal law issues and published a couple of papers on the subject.

Dr. van Steenberghe Raphaël has taught International Law at the University of Louvain for three years where he has been in charge of seminars and examination. He has also taken part in several conferences where he delivered speeches. He was an intern with the legal department of the International Court of Justice (The Hague, 2001) and the Codification Division of the United Nations (New York, 2006). As a Global Research Fellow at NYU School of Law, he is engaged in a research on the aut dedere aut judicare issue.

 

Wai Yee Wan
Global Research Fellow
Singapore

Wai Yee Wan is an Assistant Professor in the School of Law at the Singapore Management University. She graduated with an LLB (First Class Honors) from the National University of Singapore in 1996. She also holds a BCL from the University of Oxford, where she was in residence at St Edmund Hall in 1996/97. After obtaining her BCL, she joined the Singapore Legal Service and served as a Justices’ Law Clerk, Assistant Registrar and Deputy Public Prosecutor. Immediately prior to joining academia, she was a partner at Allen & Gledhill, Financial Services Department, where she practised in the areas of mergers and acquisitions as well as equity capital markets. She is currently on the Law Reform Committee of the Singapore Academy of Law.

Wai Yee’s fields of research are in corporate and securities regulation, and she has published, inter alia, in the Company and Securities Law Journal, Company Lawyer, Journal of Business Law, Singapore Journal of Legal Studies and Singapore Academy of Law Journal. She was awarded the Lee Foundation Fellow for Research Excellence in 2007. At NYU, her research proposal will be on the validity of deal protection devices in negotiated acquisition or merger transactions under Anglo-American law.

 

Xu, Duoqi
Global Research Fellow
China

Ms Xu is an Associate Professor and Associate Director of Economic Law Center at Shanghai Jiaotong University, and a Secretary-general of Tax Law Center of Shanghai Law Society, Shanghai, China. She received double Bachelor's Degrees in International Trade and Law from Hubei University School of Law in 1997 and her PhD in Finance Law from Wuhan University School of Law in 2003. Her major fields of research and teaching are Tax Law, Financial Law, Bank Law and Economic Law. Moreover, she published extensively in some of the nation’s most outstanding law reviews and her scholarship has been reprinted in specialized journals. Ms. Xu's book, Legal Aspects on Credit-right Finance, was published by the Law Press in 2005. She was rewarded a grant on her cutting-edge research on securitization issues by the China Social Science Fund in 2006, which is the highest level of government support in China academics. During her residency, Ms. Xu will focus her research on Legal Issues of Tax Planning: A Sino-US Comparison, which involves promoting rights-awareness of taxpayers and advocating democratic control of public finance.

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Academic Year 2007-2008

 

Dr. Joseph David
Berkowitz Fellow
Israel

Dr. Joseph (Yossi) David has received a BA in philosophy and Jewish history from the Open University and a LLB from Bar Ilan University, Israel. His MA and PhD are in philosophy and Jewish thought from the Hebrew University, Israel. He is the editor of The State of Israel: Between Judaism and Democracy (Israel Democracy Institute, 2003), and Questioning Dignity: Human Dignity as Supreme Modern Value, (Magnes Press, 2006). He is also the author of the forthcoming Between Logos and Nomos – Studies in Jewish Comparative Jurisprudence. Professor David's research and teaching have focused on various topics in the Jewish legal tradition from historical and jurisprudential perspective. His recent studies have focused on Jewish-Islamic comparative theories of adjudication (judicial analogy and judicial error), epistemology of law in pre-modern legal systems (memory and transmission), nature and law, violence and ethics of weapons of mass destruction. He has published numerous articles and book chapters, including articles in Ratio Juris and The Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence. His research proposal is entitled "Legal Imagination and Religious Identity in Jewish and Islamic Jurisprudential Thought."

 

Ms. Anna Dolidze
Albert Podell Global Fellow at Risk
Georgia

Anna Dolidze is a human rights lawyer and Albert Podell Global Fellow at Risk at New York University School of Law. In 2007, Anna was a Visiting Scholar at the Harriman Institute of Columbia University. Currently Chair of the Center for Democracy in Georgia, she is the former president of the Georgian Young Lawyers Association (GYLA).

Established in 1994, GYLA promotes higher standards for the legal profession and supports the professional development of law students and young lawyers in Georgia. GYLA's focus areas include promotion of rule of law, legal reform, developing legal education, building civil society networks, and ensuring transparency and accountability of the government.

A graduate of Tbilisi State University, Ms. Dolidze as well pursued extensive legal studies abroad, and received her LL.M. (Master of Laws) in Public International Law from Leiden University in the Netherlands. She has contributed to the work of a number of important organizations such as the Georgia Media Council, the Stakeholders Committee of the Millennium Challenge Georgia Fund, and the Human Rights Monitoring Council of the Penitentiary and Detention Places. Ms. Dolidze served as Adjunct Professor in Human Rights and International Law at the Caucasus School of Law and Georgian American University.

Ms. Dolidze is the author of numerous publications on legal reforms in Georgia.

 

Dr. Ludovic Hennebel
Global Research Fellow
Belgium

Dr. Ludovic Hennebel holds a PhD in Law (ULB, 2005), the Diploma on International Protection of Human Rights from the Institut Rene Cassin in Strasbourg (2001), an LLM in human rights and civil liberties (University of Leicester, UK, 1999), and a BA and MA in law (ULB, 1998). He has been a member of the Perelman Center for Legal Philosophy of the Law Faculty of the Universite Libre de Bruxelles since 2000, where he conducts his research and acts as director of the Brussels based academic association Magna Carta - Human Rights Network International. His research focuses on international human rights law. He has worked on the inter-American system of human rights, the UN system of human rights, business and human rights, global justice and global law. He is the author and editor of various publications, including, inter alia, 'Classer les droits de l¹homme' (Book with Emmanuelle Bribosia, Bruylant, 2004), 'Responsabilite des entreprises et coregulation' (Book with Thomas Berns and others, Bruylant, 2006), and 'La Convention americaine des droits de l'homme' (Bruylant, 2007) among others. At NYU, he will work on "Towards global justice: How to ensure an access to justice for the human rights violations' victims?" at the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice.

 

Professor Johanna Hey
Senior Global Emile Noel Fellow
Germany

Professor Hey is a German professor of tax law living in Cologne. In 1996 she received her Doctor Juris summa cum laude, at the University of Cologne with her thesis on "Harmonization of Business Taxation in Europe". After completing two years of a Senior Research Fellowship at the Institute of Tax Law of the University of Cologne as an assistant to Professor Joachim Lang in 2001 she finished her Postdoctoral Thesis (Habilitation) on "Tax Planning Reliability as a Legal Problem". Professor Hey is currently the Director of the Institute of Tax Law and a full professor at the University of Cologne where she teaches courses on Principles and Constitutional Framework of Taxation, Personal Income Tax, Business Taxation, Value Added Tax, Tax Procedure, European Tax Law, Administrative and Constitutional Law. In addition to her academic duties, Professor Hey is a member of the Academic Advisory Board of the German Federal Ministry of Finance, the Expert Group for Tax Codification of the Stiftung Marktwirtschaft; Head of Business Tax Integration Working Group as well as a member of the Board of the German Professors’ Association, where she was elected Vice President in 2006. She has published approximately 70 academic publications on various aspects of German, European and international tax law and German public and constitutional law. Professor Hey’s research proposal is entitled "United States Experiences with Tax Competition: Potential Answers for Germany and the European Union." Professor Hey will be affiliated with the Tax Program and the Jean Monnet Center.

 

Dr. Job Jindo
Gruss Scholar in Residence
Japan

Dr. Job Y. Jindo received a BA in the Bible and Talmud from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, in 1997. In 1999, he earned a MA in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, United States. He then completed a PhD in the Department of Bible and Ancient Semitic Languages at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 2006, with a dissertation entitled: “Biblical Metaphor Reconsidered: A Cognitive Approach to Poetic Metaphor in Biblical Prophecy” (awarded distinction). His research interests include: ancient cosmology, poetics of ancient literature, biblical law, New Testament in light of rabbinic literature, Jewish Biblical Exegesis, and history of modern biblical scholarship. While in residency at NYU, his research focuses on the cognitive approach of the poetics and the Weltanschauung of ancient literature as set forth in his dissertation.

 

Dr. Thomas Krebs
Global NYU-Oxford Research Fellow
United Kingdom/Germany

Educated in Germany, Dr. Krebs earned his LLB at the University of Kent at Canterbury (English and German Law), then earned the postgraduate Bachelor of Civil Law degree followed by doctorate at Christ Church, University of Oxford where his thesis, supervised by Professor Peter Birks, focused on the comparative law of restitution. His book 'Restitution at the Crossroads' was awarded the Cavendish Book Prize at the Annual Dinner of the Society of Legal Scholars 2001. After three years as Norton Rose Lecturer in Commercial Law at University College London, Dr. Krebs took up his present post as University Lecturer in Commercial Law at Oxford University and his Fellowship of Brasenose College. Dr. Krebs is also a practicing barrister with an associate tenancy at Serle Court, Lincoln's Inn.

During his residency at NYU, Dr. Krebs will be working on a book on agency that plans to look at the use of intermediaries from a business/management perspective, evaluating the relevant law against this background.

 

Dr. Junjiao Liang
Global Research Fellow
China

Dr. Liang is an Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of the School of Taxation, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing, China. She received a Bachelor's Degree in Economics (in finance) from the Central University of Finance & Economics in 1987 and her PhD in Economics (in taxation) from the same University in 2002. Her major fields of research and teaching are taxation administration, the taxation system of China, taxation auditing and planning. Before becoming an academic, Dr. Liang was an accountant at China Sigma Limited Corporation. Dr. Liang has an impressive academic background that includes having been awarded the San Hao Scholarship and receiving first-class honors each year of her undergraduate education. In addition, Dr. Liang has a significant publication record that includes ten books, three of which are widely used textbooks, and over 40 academic papers and articles. Her research proposal, an extension of her PhD thesis, is titled "Taxpayer Compliance and Incentive Mechanism" and examines tax administration and compliance interests in China. During her residency, Dr. Liang will be affiliated with the Tax Program.

 

Professor Yixin Liao
Senior Global Research Fellow
China

Professor Yixin Liao received his degree of Master of Law in International Law from Xiamen University, P.R.C., in December of 1984. Because of his excellent performance during his post-graduate studies, in early 1985 he became one of the faculty members at the Law School of Xiamen University. Currently, Professor Liao is a Professor of International Law as well as the Dean of the Law School of Xiamen University, a member of the Advisory Committee of National Legal Education of the Ministry of Education of China, vice-president of the Society of International Economic Law of China and vice-president of the Educational Society of Finance and Tax Law of China. In addition to being a legal scholar, Professor Liao also has rich legal practice experience. Since 1985 he has been a part-time attorney at the United Xingshi Law Firm in Xiamen City and an arbitrator of both the China International Economic & Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC), and since 1997 an arbitrator at the Xiamen Arbitration Commission. Prof. Liao's academic area focuses on international economic law and tax law. Within the field of international tax law he has published some influential textbooks, monographs, articles, and completed six research projects entrusted respectively by the National Social Science Fund, the Ministry of Education, and the Ministry of Justice of China. Between September 1993 and August 1994, Professor Liao was invited to conduct research as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School, and in February 2002 he was a senior visiting scholar at the Faculty of Law of Cambridge University, U.K. In recent years Professor Liao interests have turned to international tax issues such as taxation on electronic commerce and harmful tax competition, in addition to the comparative study on income tax laws of China and foreign countries. As a Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar and a Senior Global Research Fellow at NYU Law School, Professor Liao will conduct his research project on "Comparative Study on Corporate Income Tax Laws between China and the United States."

 

Dr. Amparo Martinez
Global Research Fellow
Spain

Dr. Amparo Martinez Guerra is a member of the research project Reforms, Universal Jurisdiction and Fundamental Rights Criminal Protection of Madrid directed by Dr. Luis Rodriguez Ramos and supported by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhems Universitat (Bonn), Max Planck-Institut fur auslandisches und internationales Strafrecht (Freiburg am Breisgau) and the Ortega and Gasset Foundation. She is also a consultant at the Center for Political and International Studies. Amparo received her LL.B from the Universidad Complutense of Madrid in 2001. In 2002, she became a PhD candidate and predoctoral fellow in the Criminal Law Department, Universidad Complutense of Madrid. She completed her PhD in Law cum laude in 2006 with her dissertation on Criminal Law and consumer protection in the EU and the U.S.A. She has been a visiting researcher at the European Law Research Center Harvard Law School under the supervision of Prof. David. W. Kennedy (2003); at the Institut fur Kriminologie und Wirtschaftsstrafrecht, Albert-Ludwig Universitat with Dr. Prof. h.c Klaus Tiedemann (2004); at the European University Institute, Department of Law, in Florence (2005) and at the New York University Law School Library in 2006. Before joining the University, she was trainee at the Investment Promotion Bureau, Spanish Ministry of Economy. In her research proposal, "International Criminal Jurisdiction" Dr. Martinez will focus on the role of the International Criminal Court Prosecutor and national Prosecutors applying the Universal Jurisdiction Principle investigating international crimes and crimes against humanity.

 

Dr. Makane Mbengue
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
Senegal

Dr. Makane Moise Mbengue, a native of Senegal, is a Teaching Assistant and Researcher at the Law Faculty of the University of Geneva, Switzerland. In 1997, he received his LLB from the University Gaston Berger of Saint-Louis (Senegal) in Public Law. In 1998, he received a Masters degree (Maitrise in the French system) in Public Law from the University of Saint-Louis. In 1999, he received an LLM in Business and Economic Law from the same University. In 2001, he obtained the Certificate of the Center for Studies and Research in International Law and International Relations. Dr. Mbengue completed his PhD in international law, summa cum laude, from the University of Geneva in June 2007. Dr. Mbengue is also the author of a number of articles in widely respected and cited scientific journals and books on trade and environment, international dispute-settlement, the law of treaties, law of international watercourses and WTO law. From 2001 to 2005, he worked as a researcher for the Swiss National Science Foundation on a project entitled "Trade, the Environment and the International Regulation of Biotechnology". From September 2004 to June 2005, he was a law clerk at the International Court of Justice (The Hague, Netherlands). He has been a consultant for the World Bank, the World Health Organization, the Nile Basin Initiative and the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. At NYU School of Law, he will focus on the relationship between Globalization and Regionalism in the Protection of the Environment and of Health. The research will identify and describe the various types of relations between multilateralism and regionalism in the field of natural resources management and health protection. Dr. Mbengue's research proposal is entitled "Globalization and Regionalism in the Protection of the Environment and of Health." During his residency, Dr. Mbengue will be affiliated with the Institute for International Law and Justice.

 

Ms. Yasuko Morooka
Global Japanese Federation of Bar Fellow
Japan

Ms. Morooka is the candidate nominated by the Japanese Federation Bar Association (JFBA).  As a registered attorney with the Tokyo Bar Association and the JFBA, she has been actively involved in various committees and projects especially those involving gender equality, the protection of foreigners' human rights, and the elimination of racial discrimination in Japan. She has especially worked for the right to education for children of foreigners and ethnic minorities, focusing on foreign and ethnic schools in Japan. She has tackled reform of the educational system in order to secure these rights.  Most recently she served as the deputy direct general of the Executive Committee Symposium for the 47th Convention on the Protection of Human Rights by the JFBA. Ms. Moorkoa has written a number of articles on the issues of gender and discrimination and intends to further explore this area in her research proposal entitled "A Comparative Analysis of Legal Systems and its Effects to Eliminate Racial Discrimination in the United States and Other Countries."

 

Ms. Adrianna Opromolla
Global Fellow from Government
Italy

Ms. Opromolla is currently employed as Social Policy Officer at Caritas Europa.  However, her professional experiences also include serving as a lawyer at both the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance and the European Court of Human Rights. In addition, she has worked on the Advisory Panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion and Beliefs (assisting the Italian Director) and has served as the delegated expert for the Holy See in the Ad Hoc Committee on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings of the Council of Europe drafting the Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings. Ms. Opromolla’s proposal entitled "Enhancing Labour Rights in a Globalized World: Finding Solutions through a Comparative Transatlantic Perspective" will examine the impact of global trade on human rights, in particular of the WTO rules on Labor law and social standards. Within this context, Ms. Opromolla intends to carry out comparative research between the different legal arguments defended by the EU and the US.  Ms. Opromolla holds an LL.M. from the University of Geneva and recently began her Ph.D. studies at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium.  During her residency, Ms. Opromolla will be affiliated with the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice.

 

Dr. Ronen Perry
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Perry is currently serving as an Associate Professor at the University of Haifa where he has received two awards for excellence in teaching. Dr. Perry received his LLB magna cum laude from Tel Aviv University in 1996. He was admitted to the special program for excellent students (top 0.5% of undergraduate students in all disciplines), and the IDF academic reserve (top undergraduate students in select disciplines). In 1997, he completed with distinction his LLM studies, as part of the direct doctoral track requirements, at the Hebrew University. He then served for three years in the IDF JAG Corps. He received his LL.D. summa cum laude from the Hebrew University in 2001. In addition, Dr. Perry is one of the founding editors, and a senior editor (one of six) of the Journal of Tort Law, a University of California-Berkeley Publication, and the editor-in-chief of the Haifa Law Review. Dr. Perry has published more than twenty articles on tort, insurance, remedies, jurisprudence, and legal education and his book, Economic Ricochets, discusses the problem of relational purely economic loss from historical, comparative, and theoretical perspectives. His research proposal is entitled "A Critical Study of the Consequential/Relational Economic Loss Dichotomy in Tort Law."

 

Professor Michelle Ratton-Sanchez
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
Brazil

Professor Ratton-Sanchez is a professor at the Law School of Getulio Vargas Foundation (DireitoGV/ FGV-EDESP), in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and researcher at the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Research (CEBRAP), for the project entitled "Democracy and Law in Brazil." She earned a PhD with distinction from the Law School of the University of Sao Paulo (USP), Brazil, Department of Philosophy and General Theory of Law (2004). She was a visiting scholar at the International Law Department of the Graduate Institute of International Studies (GIIS), in Geneva, Switzerland (2001) and she has a Bachelor in law from the Law School of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a specialization in Business Law (1998). She received a fellowship from the State of Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) during her PhD studies (2001-2004) and, during her undergraduate studies (1995-1998), as well as a fellowship from the Brazilian Governmental Foundation in the Special Program Trainee for Undergraduate and Graduate Students (PET-CAPES). Her areas of interest include international economic law, recent changes in international regulation and how non-state actors influence and participate in international fora and policies. Since 2003, she has worked together with other researchers on the creation of an innovative course on global law for the DireitoGV Law School, this course was started for undergraduates in 2005. Professor Ratton-Sanchez's research proposal is entitled, "The Incorporation of OECD Rules and Practices by the Brazilian Legal System: Intergovernmental System vs. Transnational Regulation." During her residency, Professor Ratton-Sanchez will be affiliated with the Institute for International Law and Justice's Global Administrative Law project.

 

Dr. Yofi Tirosh
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Yofi Tirosh received her LLM and S.J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School, and her LL.B from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She clerked for Hon. Justice Cheshin of Israel's Supreme Court, and served as a fellow at Michigan's Institute for the Humanities. Tirosh will join the Tel Aviv Law Faculty as an Assistant Professor in fall 2008. Since 2004, she has been teaching at the College of Management Law School, where she was named best lecturer. Her fields of research and teaching include antidiscrimination law, employment law, human rights, gender and law, and contemporary legal theory, with a special emphasis on body, identity, culture, and language. Her article, "Adjudicating Appearance: From Identity to Personhood" is forthcoming at the Yale Journal of Law and Feminism. In Israel, Tirosh publishes articles on the discrimination of Arab citizens of Israel, on the rhetoric of judicial opinions in rape cases, on women and the military, and on affirmative action in Israel's civil service. In her research proposal entitled “Protecting Unclassifiable Identities: A Contemporary Challenge for Antidiscrimination Law” Dr. Tirosh proposes to examine discrimination against people whose identity defies clear classification on bases such as sex, race, age, religion, etc. With this in mind, Dr. Tirosh hopes to develop a new theoretical basis and doctrinal model that would enable courts to recognize a new type of discrimination claim within existing antidiscrimination laws.

 

Professor Stavros Tsakyrakis
Senior Global Emile Noel Fellow
Greece

Professor Tsakyrakis is an Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at Athens University where he teaches courses on Human Rights, General Theory of the State, and Legal Ethics while simultaneously serving as a practicing attorney where he has successfully argued cases before the European Court of Human Rights. Dr. Tsakyrakis has published extensively on numerous Human Rights issues including terrorism, hate speech and the death penalty. Professor Tsakyrakis has had various sabbaticals in Paris, Harvard University, and Columbia University, and while at NYU Law he will spend his time conducting on a research project entitled "The Balancing Approach on the Balance: Human Rights Limitations in the ECHR" which will provide research for another book he will write on the general theory of human rights law. During his residency, Professor Tsakyrakis will be affiliated with the Jean Monnet Center.

 

tuoriDr. Kaius Tuori
Hauser Research Scholar
Finland
 

Dr. Kaius Tuori holds a doctorate in Law and a M.A. in History from his studies at the universities of Helsinki, Finland, and La Sapienza in Rome, Italy. His research interests include legal history, Roman law, legal anthropology, and classical archaeology. In his work on intellectual history he studied how modern law affected the history of ancient Roman law. During his stay with the Hauser Global Law School Program, he shall pursue a similar chronologically challenged project on how Americal Legal Realism influenced the study of early law during the mid-20th century.

Last year Dr. Tuori was the University Lecturer in Legal History at the Faculty of Law at the University of Helsinki. In 2008, he shall continue his post-doctoral project at the Center of Excellence of Global Governance Research at the Erik Castren Institute of International Law and Human Rights in Helsinki. His work has been published in The Journal of Legal History, Revue Internationale des Droits de l'Antiquite and the Legal History Review.

http://blogs.helsinki.fi/kaiustuori/

 

Mr. Chih-Ching Yu
Global Fellow from Practice
Taiwan

Mr. Yu earned his LL.B degree from the Department of Law of Soochow University in 1998, then passed both the entrance examination of the National Taipei University Graduate School of Law and the national judicial examination. In 2005, he completed his master thesis entitled: "A Study on Personal Information Protection in the Field of the Co-Marketing of the Financial Holding Company."   Mr. Yu's professional experience includes six years as a prosecutor in the Taiwan Taipei District, first working on criminal cases, then in the Domestic Violence, Child Abuse and Sexual Crime Division, and most recently on cases involving corruption and financial crime.  In October 2006, he was appointed to prosecute an insider-trading case, in which one of the accused was the son-in-law of Taiwan's incumbent President Chen Shui-Bian. With his specialized training in financial laws, he successfully persuaded judges to make a guilty verdict.  His courtroom defense was mentioned as the "defense of the century" by a leading Taiwanese financial magazine, Business Weekly.  Through his experiences working in this area, Mr. Yu was made aware that the number of financial scandals in Taiwan has continued to increase over the past years. This experience has inspired Mr. Yu to further investigate the techniques and approaches used in detecting financial crimes in his research proposal entitled "Government Strategies for the Prevention of Corporate Corruption."

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Academic Year 2006-2007

 

Dr. Marian Angeles Ahumada
Global Research Fellow
Spain

Dr. Marian Angeles Ahumada, a native of Santander, Spain, is Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. In 1988, she received her LLB from the Universidad de Valladolid, Spain. In 1990 she was conferred her Diploma of Specialization in Constitutional Law and Political Science from the Centro de Estudios Constitucionales, Spain, and received the Constiutional Law Prize. Dr. Ahumada completed her PhD in law (doctor europeus), cum laude, premio extraordinario, from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, in 2004.

She has being visiting researcher at Max-Planck-Institut in Heidelberg, Harvard Law School and NYU School of Law, and visiting scholar at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa and the University of Essex. Since 1998 she has been Guest Professor at the Universidad Externado de Colombia as a member of the Faculty teaching the Master Course on Constitutional and Parliamentary Law in Bogotá. During the academic years 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 she taught the course Introduction to Civil Law and Comparative Constitutional Law in the William & Mary Summer Law Program in Madrid. She is Tutor and Professor at the Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitucionales, Madrid, Spain, and in 2004 was named collaborator of the Global Law Garrigues Chair at the Universidad de Navarra. She has lectured in various countries in Europe and Latin America and taken part in the Doctoral Program organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and the Beijing University of Foreign Studies. From 2001 to 2004, Dr. Ahumada was Academic Director of the EU-China Legal and Judicial Program (Lawyers’ Training) in Madrid.

Dr. Ahumada has published a number of legal articles in the fields of constitutional law, law of constitutional courts and comparative constitutionalism. Her PhD research was focused on the comparison between the American and European approaches to constitutional review. This research was awarded the “Nicolás Pérez Serrano” Prize for doctoral dissertations in constitutional law and political science in 2005, and served as the basis for two books: La Jurisdicción Constitucional en Europa. Bases teóricas y políticas (Constitutional Jurisdiction in Europe. Political and Theoretical Foundations), published in 2005, and Judicial Review: el control de constitucionalidad en los Estados Unidos (forthcoming).

At NYU School of Law, she will embark on research on the relationships among state and federal courts and the way “judicial federalism” influences and is influenced by the performance of federalism in broader sense. For a variety of reasons she thinks that United States is a unique laboratory for this work, even if she plans not confining the research to the American case. To spend time at the Law School, she was granted a fellowship by the Caja Madrid Foundation and obtained a permission of leave from her university.

 

Dr. Leora Batnitzky
Berkowitz Fellow
United States of America

Dr. Leora Batnitzky is Associate Professor of Religion at Princeton University. She received a BA in philosophy from Barnard College, Columbia University and a BA in biblical studies from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Her MA and PhD are in religion from Princeton University. She is the author of Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation (Cambridge, 2006) and Idolatry and Representation: The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig Reconsidered (Princeton, 2000). She is also the editor of the forthcoming Martin Buber: Schriften zur Philosophie und Religion (Gütersloher) and, since 2004, the co-editor of Jewish Studies Quarterly.

Professor Batnitzky's research and teaching have focused on modern religious thought and on Jewish thought particularly. Increasingly, she has focused on the historical and philosophical continuities between religious thought and political theory as they relate to the development of modern legal theory. She has published numerous articles and book chapters, including articles in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies and Cardozo Law Review.

At NYU School of Law, Professor Batnitzky's work will focus on the conceptual relation between one of the first proponents of legal positivism Hans Kelsen (1881-1973) and the neo-Kantian Jewish philosopher Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) to show some of the ways in which Kelsen's theory of law in general and his theory of international law in particular may be conceptually related if not indebted to Cohen's Jewish theological corrective of Kant. This research aims to demonstrate the common philosophical and political endeavor of modern Jewish thinkers and modern legal theorists influenced by Kelsen to define a concept of law that denies that coercion is an intrinsic part of law. This work is part of a larger project that examines the concept of law in modern religious thought (Jewish and Christian) and modern legal theory (Anglo-American and Continental). Professor Batnitzky's project is supported by a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew Mellon Foundation.

 

Rabbi Naftali Cohn
Gruss Scholar in Residence
United States of America

Rabbi Naftali Cohn received a BA from Harvard University, United States, in 1996. In 2001 he earned an MA in Talmudic Studies from Yeshiva University, United States, and in 2002 was ordained by the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary of Yeshiva University. He is currently pursuing a PhD in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania, United States. In addition, since 2002, he has served as an Adjunct Instructor in Judaic Studies at Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University.

His current research, on the ancient Jewish legal work known as the Mishnah, combines the perspectives of narrative theory and ritual theory to read ritual narrative texts as cultural documents. He is also exploring the cultural construction of women's lives in the Mishnah and in other ancient Jewish legal and narrative texts.

 

Dr. Catriona Drew
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
United Kingdom

Dr. Catriona Drew holds an LLB from the University of Aberdeen and a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science. She lectured in public international law at the Universities of Dundee and Glasgow in Scotland before joining the School of Oriental and African Studies, of the University of London, in 2003. She has been a Visiting Fellow at the Human Rights Program of Harvard Law School, and is co-founder of the Centre for International Law and Colonialism at SOAS. Her principal research interest relates to the international law of self-determination. She is currently working on an international legal history of the relationship between the principle of self-determination and population transfer.

 

Dr. Dimitrios Kyritsis
Global Research Fellow
Greece

Dr. Dimitrios Kyritsis graduated from the University of Athens earning a degree in Law in 2000. One year later he was awarded the M.Jur. from Mansfield College, University of Oxford. He then received the M.Phil. and D.Phil. from Brasenose College, University of Oxford. His thesis, entitled "Divided Authority: Separation of Powers and Legal Theory," addressed the controversy over the nature of law through an account of the ideal of separation of powers. After completing his thesis, Dr. Kyritsis returned to Greece and was actively involved in teaching and research in legal philosophy at the University of Athens.

Dr. Kyritsis's primary research interests range from analytic jurisprudence to constitutional theory. In his current research he aims to step back into moral philosophy and advance a theory of practical authority that can be applied to law as well as to other systems of authoritative guidance more generally.

 

Dr. Michael Likosky
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
United States of America

Dr. Michel B. Likosky teaches in the Law School of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. In 2006, he published Law, Infrastructure, and Human Rights (Cambridge University Press) with the underlying research supported by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. A second book, The Silicon Empire (Ashgate 2005), was based upon doctoral work completed in the Law Faculty of Oxford University examining the continuities and discontinuities between colonial and present-day high technology-based transnational legal orders. He has edited two books: Transnational Legal Processes (Cambridge University Press 2002) and Privatising Development (Martinus Nijhoff 2005). He has twice contributed to the Oxford Amnesty Lectures (Oxford University Press 2003, 2006). He teaches International Economic Law, Law and Globalization, and Public International Law. Dr. Likosky has held fellowships at the University of Oxford, the University of Bonn, and the Center for Media Education in Washington, D.C. He has consulted for corporation and worked with non-governmental organizations.

 

Dr. Nicola Lucchi
Global Engelberg Research Fellow
Italy

Dr. Nicola Lucchi is a lecturer at the Law Faculty of the University of Ferrara, Italy, and research associate at the Department of Legal Studies of the University of Ferrara. He is a Fellow of the Center for Internet and Society at the Stanford Law School and he is currently a Global Engelberg Research Fellow at the NYU School of Law.

Dr. Lucchi was a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law, and at the University of Texas at Austin, School of Law.

His current research focuses on intellectual property issues and rights in digital media. At NYU School of Law, he will work on a project concerning the management of digital intellectual property rights and its impact on consumer protection.

His awards include the European Commission's Kaléidoscope Programme scholarship and the Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarship to the University of Texas at Austin.

From June 2001 to May 2005 he worked as Honorary Judge at the Court of Ferrara. Before joining the academia, Dr. Lucchi was a public relations assistant to one of Italy's foremost classical music conductors Claudio Abbado and also to the Mahler Chamber Orchestra.

He has published on legal informatics, comparative intellectual property, information society and cyberlaw. Among his recent publications are: "Intellectual Property Rights in Digital Media: A Comparative Analysis of Legal Protection, Technological Measures and New Business Models under E.U. and U.S. Law" (Buffalo Law Review, Vol. 53, No. 4, Fall 2005); "The Supremacy of Techno-Governance: Privatization of Digital Content and Consumer Protection in the Globalized Information Society" (International Journal of Law and Information Technology, forthcoming 2006) and Digital Media & Intellectual Property (Berlin, Springer-Verlag, forthcoming 2006).

 

Professor Patrick Macklem
Senior Global Human Rights and Global Justice Research Fellow
Canada

Patrick Macklem is a Professor of Law at University of Toronto, a Permanent Visiting Professor at Central European University, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He holds law degrees from Harvard and Toronto, and an undergraduate degree in political science and philosophy from McGill. He served as Law Clerk for Chief Justice Brian Dickson of the Supreme Court of Canada and as a constitutional advisor to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. He was a Visiting Scholar at Stanford Law School in 1988 and at U.C.L.A. School of Law in 1992. In 2003, he was selected as a Fulbright New Century Scholar, taught at the European University Institute, and was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School.

Professor Macklem is the author of Indigenous Difference and the Constitution of Canada (2001) (awarded the Canadian Political Science Association 2002 Donald Smiley Prize for best book on Canadian governance and the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences 2002 Harold Innis Prize by for the best English-language book in the social sciences), co-editor of Canadian Constitutional Law (2003), The Security of Freedom: Essays on Canada's Anti-terrorism Bill (2001), and Labour and Employment Law (2004), and has published numerous articles on international human rights law, cultural minorities, constitutional law, indigenous peoples and the law, and labour law.

 

Prof. Dr. C.W. Maris
Senior Global Research Fellow
The Netherlands

Prof. Dr. C.W. Maris has been a professor of legal philosophy at the University of Amsterdam since 1988. Since 1992, he has been avisiting professor at the Universities of Surinam and the Dutch Antilles. He is the editor of several journals in the fields of jurisprudence and philosophy. His main fields of research concern the concept of liberty and its practical applications, multiculturalism, love, art, law and literature, and epistemology. Among his publications are A Critique of the Empiricist Explanation of Morality (doctoral dissertation, cum laude); Letters on Liberty; Law, Order, and Freedom; and Twelve Loves. He also wrote and brought on stage the philosophical oratorio Horror Vacui (in cooperation with the composer José-Luis Greco) and the philosophical dialogue The Dance of Zarathustra.

 

Mr. Ben McFarlane
Global NYU-Oxford Research Fellow
United Kingdom

Mr. Ben McFarlane is the University Lecturer in Property Law & Trusts at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He holds MA and B.C.L. degrees from Oxford, having graduated first in his undergraduate class. He has published articles on contract law and the law of restitution, but his primary current research interest is property law. He is the Convenor of the Land Law teaching group at Oxford and is currently preparing a textbook on Land Law. He also has an interest in French law and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Paris II in 2005-6.

Mr. McFarlane has written widely on the doctrine of proprietary estoppel, and spoke on comparative aspects of that topic at the Obligations III conference in Brisbane in July 2006. His particular interest is in the possible expansion of that doctrine in English law, and he is therefore keen to examine the application of the related doctrine of equitable estoppel in the law(s) of the United States. He wishes to use his time in New York to explore the practical application of equitable estoppel, especially in relation to commercial disputes, and hopes to use the American experience as a means of finding some valuable lessons for the future development of English law. He has undertaken such comparative research before, when writing an article entitled "The Recovery of Money Paid On Judgments Later Reversed" which looked extensively at American law.

 

Rios Figueroa  
Dr. Julio Ríos-Figueroa
Hauser Research Scholar
Mexico
 

Dr. Julio Ríos-Figueroa holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Politics both from New York University. His research focuses on constitutional adjudication, judicial independence, and corruption with an emphasis in Latin America. While at the Hauser Global Law School Program he plans to expand his dissertation work on the effects of judicial independence on corruption, and to analyze the factors that determine variation in the institutional structure of judiciaries and prosecutorial organs across Latin America.

Dr. Ríos-Figueroa will become Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at CIDE, in Mexico City. His work has been published in Comparative Political StudiesLatin American Politics & Society, and the Journal of Latin American Studies.

 

Ms. Makiko Sakuma
Global Japanese Federation of Bar Fellow
Japan

Ms. Makiko Sakuma graduated from Keio University, Japan, with an LL.B. degree in 1995 and passed the Japan National Bar Examination in 1996. From 1997 to 1999, she studied at the Legal Training and Research Institute of the Supreme Court of Japan. Since 1999, she has been registered as a lawyer with the Japan Federation of Bar Association (JFBA) and the Daini Tokyo Bar Association (DTBA).

Ms. Sakuma has been involved in many cases relating to women's human rights such as domestic violence and divorce cases since she became a lawyer. She has been on the Committee on Sexual Equality of the DTBA since 2002, and in 2003, she served as a vice chairperson of the committee. She also took part in writing the book Jirei de Manabu Shihou ni okeru Gender Bias (Gender Bias in Courts) Tokyo: Akashi, 2003.

Ms. Sakuma worked actively for the establishment of law schools in Japan as an officer of the Law School Center of the JFBA from 2002 to 2004, and also as a member of the Law School Establishment Support Committee of the DTBA from 2001 to 2004.

Dr. Mario Savino
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
Italy

Dr. Mario Savino is a researcher at the Tuscia University of Viterbo, Italy. He received his PhD in Administrative Law from the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in 2004. In 2005, he was UE Law Poros Chair Professor at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore, India. He teaches European Administrative Law at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" and is coordinator of the research team on "Evolution of a polycentric administrative space," within the Connex Network (Connecting Excellence on European Governance), at the Mannheim Centre for European Social Research-Mzes, University of Mannheim, Germany.

His fields of research interest are global and European administrative law. He has published a monograph on the EU committee system (I comitati dell’Unione europea, Milano, Giuffrè, 2005). He has also written on international transgovernmental bodies, the European Commission, Italian administrative reforms and other topics related to domestic administrative law. He is currently researching on public order, public security and immigration at national, European and global levels. At NYU School of Law he will work on the specific issue of the accountability of transgovernmental networks.

 

Dr. Pierpaolo Settembri
Global Emile Noel Fellow
Italy

Dr. Pierpaolo Settembri holds a degree in Political Science from LUISS "Guido Carli" University, Rome (2001), a master in European Political and Administrative Studies from the College of Europe, Bruges (2002), and a doctorate in Political Science from the University of Florence and the IEP of Paris (2006). He is a researcher in EU Institutions and Decision-Making at the European Institute of Public Administration, Maastricht, and assistant to the chair of Political Science at LUISS "Guido Carli" University. His research interests lie in various aspects of European politics, including the role of political parties and interest groups at the European level, transparency and accountability issues, and institutional evolution and dynamics. Presently, he is working on the publication of his doctoral dissertation and a co-authored monograph on the European Parliament. At the Jean Monnet Center at NYU School of Law, he will mainly focus on the impact of the enlargements of the European Union on its institutions, exploring in particular the complex relationship between widening and deepening.

 

Dr. Noam Sher
Global Law and Economics Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Noam Sher is an Assistant Professor of Law (Lecturer) at Radzyner School of Law, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel. He received his J.S.D. in 2004, LLM in 2000 and LLB in 1991 from Tel-Aviv University; and his MA in 1992 and BA in 1989 both in economics from Tel-Aviv University. The subject matter of his doctoral dissertation is: Underwriters' Civil Liability for IPO's.

After his LLB and economics studies, Dr. Sher practiced law with Efraty-Galili and Co., Law-Office and then he joined the Radzyner School of Law, IDC. Dr. Sher's main areas of research and teaching are: corporate law, securities regulation, economic analysis of law, property law and bankruptcy law. Dr. Sher served as Co-Editor-in-Chief of Law & Business, and the IDC Law Review, in the period of its establishment. Dr. Sher has been a member of the Israeli Bar Association since 1992.

For the period of academic year 2006-2007 Dr. Sher is a Global Law and Economics Research Fellow at New York University School of Law. His main projects are in the areas of economic analysis of medical malpractice, securities regulation and intellectual property law.

 

Dr. Jichun Shi
Global Research Fellow
China

Dr. Jichun Shi is a professor at Renmin University of China School of Law, Beijing. He received a Bachelor of Law majoring in politics education from Anhui Normal University, P.R. China, in 1982. He then continued into Anhui University Department of Law and, a few years later, went to Renmin University of China, specialized in civil law, earning his Master of Law in 1985 and Doctor of Law in 1991. He has written and lectured on companies and enterprises law, competition law, consumer law, intellectual property law, and the theory of civil, business and economic law, etc.

He currently focuses on the Chinese anti-trust legislation, paying attention to privatization of, and anti-monopoly on public utilities. He has been appointed as one of the Expert Consultants of the Legislative Committee on Chinese Antimonopoly Law by the Legislative Affairs Office of the PRC State Council. He is also interested in the thinking and institutions of Anglo-Saxon law compared with that of continental law, and wishes to develop comprehensive first-hand experience in the U.S. legal system.

 

Dr. Yan'an Shi
Global Crime and Justice Research Fellow
China

Dr. Yan'an Shi is an associate professor at the School of Law of Renmin University of China (RUC), and the fellow of the Research Center for Criminal Jurisprudence at RUC, one of the key national research institutes of humanistic and social sciences in universities of China. He is a part-time fellow of the College for Criminal Science at Beijing Normal University. He is also the editor of the criminal law part of Jurists Review, which is one of the most influential law journals in China.

He received his master degree in July of 2000, and his doctorate in July of 2003 from RUC. From August of 1994 to August of 1997, he worked in Mudanjiang Procuratorate of Heilongjiang Province, China, and he received the title of associate procurator in May of 1996.

His major interest is criminal law, and his favorite field is criminal policy and international cooperation in criminal matters. He has published one book entitled Inter-regional Concurrent Criminal Jurisdiction in China, and cooperated with another young scholar in writing a book on the offences against decency. Since 2000, he has published more than 40 papers on criminal law.

 

Dr. Benjamin Straumann
Global Research Fellow
Alberico Gentili Fellow in the Program in the History and Theory of International Law
Switzerland

Dr. Benjamin Straumann completed his doctoral dissertation (insigni cum laude) on the classical foundations of Hugo Grotius' natural and international law in 2005 at the University of Zurich after studies in Zurich and Rome. He is currently a Global Research Fellow in the Hauser Global Law School Program. He is also an Alberico Gentili Fellow in the Program in the History and Theory of International Law. Previously, Benjamin has worked for the Swiss Mission to the United Nations and was a Visiting Scholar at Columbia University. His research interests include the history of natural and international law, natural rights and social contract theories as well as the early modern reception of Roman law and classical political thought.

His publications include "'Ancient Caesarian Lawyers' in a State of Nature: Roman Tradition and Natural Rights in Hugo Grotius' De iure praedae," Political Theory 34, 3 (June 2006), pp. 328-50; "The Right to Punish as a Just Cause of War in Hugo Grotius' Natural Law," Studies in the History of Ethics 2 (February 2006), pp. 1-20, available at http://www.historyofethics.org/022006/022006Straumann.shtml; and an article on Rome and her influence in modern culture and scholarship in Brill's New Pauly. Encyclopaedia of the Ancient World, ed. M. Landfester (Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, forthcoming).

 

Prof. Dr. Michael Tumpel
Global Tax Research Fellow
Austria

Prof. Dr. Michael Tumpel was born in 1964 in Vienna, Austria. He holds a M.BA and a doctoral degree from the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration. After receiving venia docendi (Habilitation) for Tax Law and Tax Management from Vienna University he became an associate professor of the Vienna University. In 2000, he was appointed full professor at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz, Austria.

Professor Tumpel's research interests include various aspects of Austrian, international and European tax law. He has authored or edited several books and has published articles in national and international journals. His current research focuses on the reform of the EU Value Added Tax system to combat tax fraud.

He has been awarded the Albert Hensel Award of the German Tax Law Association 1998, Münster 1998 and the Scientific Award of the International Fiscal Association (IFA), Austrian Branch, Vienna 1998 for his habilitation thesis on Value Added Tax on Intra-Community Trade.

 

Ms. Pei-Hsien Wong
Global Fellow from Practice
Taiwan

Ms. Pei-Hsien Wong comes from Taiwan. She graduated from the National Chengchi University School of Law and passed the graduate school's entrance examination in the same university in 1995. She subsequently passed the national judicial examination and was admitted to the Bar in 1996. In 2001, she got her master's degree and wrote a thesis entitled "The civil disputes on the safekeeping boxes in the bank."

Regarding her career, she has been a prosecutor for nearly 7 years. Within this period, she has gone through different departments in her office and has had the experience of investigating criminal cases, debating in the court room and implementing criminal sanction. Those professional careers give her a complete training to go through different parts in the legal procedure. Due to her interest in the rights of women and children, she mainly dealt with cases relating to sexual harassment and assault and domestic violence in the past years.

As Taiwan faces a shortage of prison space and difficulties in prison expansion, Ms. Wong has started to think about the necessities of jailing a criminal. Given the global economic slow-down and the financial difficulties of all governments, she believes that it must be a common problem in the world. Therefore, she applied to participate in the Global Visitors Program at New York University School of Law to perform research on governmental alternatives to jailing criminals. Moreover, she hopes that this study will also attract the attention of other visiting scholars, working together to solve the difficult problem.

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Academic Year 2005-2006

 

Marian Angeles Ahumada
Global Research Fellow
Spain

Dr. Marian Angeles Ahumada, a native of Santander, Spain, is Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. In 1988, she received her LLB from the Universidad de Valladolid, Spain. In 1990 she was conferred her Diploma of Specialization in Constitutional Law and Political Science from the Centro de Estudios Constitucionales, Spain, and received the Constiutional Law Prize. Dr. Ahumada completed her PhD in law (doctor europeus), cum laude, premio extraordinario, from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, in 2004.

She has being visiting researcher at Max-Planck-Institut in Heidelberg, Harvard Law School and NYU School of Law, and visiting scholar at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa and the University of Essex. Since 1998 she has been Guest Professor at the Universidad Externado de Colombia as a member of the Faculty teaching the Master Course on Constitutional and Parliamentary Law in Bogotá. During the academic years 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 she taught the course Introduction to Civil Law and Comparative Constitutional Law in the William & Mary Summer Law Program in Madrid. She is Tutor and Professor at the Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitucionales, Madrid, Spain, and in 2004 was named collaborator of the Global Law Garrigues Chair at the Universidad de Navarra. She has lectured in various countries in Europe and Latin America and taken part in the Doctoral Program organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and the Beijing University of Foreign Studies. From 2001 to 2004, Dr. Ahumada was Academic Director of the EU-China Legal and Judicial Program (Lawyers’ Training) in Madrid.

Dr. Ahumada has published a number of legal articles in the fields of constitutional law, law of constitutional courts and comparative constitutionalism. Her PhD research was focused on the comparison between the American and European approaches to constitutional review. This research was awarded the “Nicolás Pérez Serrano” Prize for doctoral dissertations in constitutional law and political science in 2005, and served as the basis for two books: La Jurisdicción Constitucional en Europa. Bases teóricas y políticas (Constitutional Jurisdiction in Europe. Political and Theoretical Foundations), published in 2005, and Judicial Review: el control de constitucionalidad en los Estados Unidos (forthcoming).

At NYU School of Law, she will embark on research on the relationships among state and federal courts and the way “judicial federalism” influences and is influenced by the performance of federalism in broader sense. For a variety of reasons she thinks that United States is a unique laboratory for this work, even if she plans not confining the research to the American case. To spend time at the Law School, she was granted a fellowship by the Caja Madrid Foundation and obtained a permission of leave from her university.

 

Bateup Christine Bateup
Hauser Research Scholar

Australia

Ms. Christine Bateup is a J.S.D. Candidate at NYU School of Law from Australia. She specializes in comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory, with a particular interest in theories of constitutional dialogue. Her doctoral dissertation explores how a clearly defined form of constitutional dialogue between courts, the political branches of government and the people might be institutionalized if a Bill of Rights is incorporated into Australian law, building on existing forms of institutional interaction that exist in the Australian setting.

Ms. Bateup completed her B.A./LL.B. degrees at the University of Melbourne, Australia, in 1997, graduating with first class honors in Law.  She subsequently was employed as a legal clerk at the Federal Court of Australia in Melbourne.  In 2001, she graduated from the London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom, receiving an LL.M. degree with Distinction.  

 

Stefano Cappiello
Global Fellow from Government
Italy

Mr. Stefano Cappiello currently works in the Law and Economics Research Department of the Bank of Italy, where he carries out legal research following a "positive" as well as a "normative" economic approach to the analysis of the regulatory framework; his main fields of research are corporate law and financial regulation. Among his tasks he has been involved in the financial regulatory and supervision activity of the Italian Central Bank, has contributed to the recent reform of the Italian company law, has taken part in the revision process of the OECD Principles of Corporate Governance.     

After having graduated cum laude in law at the University of Rome in 1996, he practiced as a trainee-lawyer and qualified for the Rome Bar Association. In 1998 he attended his military service in the Italian Financial Crime Police, serving as officer in charge of legal affairs. In 1999 he gained an LL.M. from the University of Chicago. He routinely gives lectures on banking law and corporate law at the University of Rome and has participated to various conferences on the same topics. In 2006 he is expected to get his Ph.D. from the University of Viterbo in "Law and Economics."

Author of numerous scholarly publications in the areas of economic analysis of law, banking law and corporate law, he has just completed a book entitled Directors Remuneration and Equity Based Incentives where he analyses the Italian regulation on equity-based incentives taking into account their economic effects.

Alicia Cebada-Romero
Global Emile Noel Fellow
Spain

Dr. Alicia Cebada-Romero received her Master in European Union Law from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain, in 1995. In 2000, she received her Doctor in Law, cum laude, from the the same institution. She was awarded with the “premio extraordinario” for her doctoral thesis and with an award from the Spanish Royal Academy of Doctors for the best thesis in the Legal and Social Studies Area. Recently she was the Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute, Italy.

Dr. Cebada-Romero's areas of research interest are external action of the European Union, international organizations, and international responsibility. At NYU School of Law she will be researching trade policy as a means to promote development from the perspective of the European Union.

 

Olivia Coldrey
Global Emile Noel Fellow from Government
Australia

Ms. Olivia Coldrey is a lawyer with the Export Finance and Insurance Corporation (EFIC) in Sydney, Australia. She advises EFIC on the legal aspects of financing Australian exports and overseas investments, and has particular experience in structured trade finance and political risk insurance transactions. Prior to joining EFIC, Olivia worked in the finance practice of Baker & McKenzie in Sydney and Hong Kong.

Olivia received her B.Ec. from the Australian National University and her LL.B. from the University of New South Wales, Australia. She also holds a LL.M. with Merit from the London School of Economics and Political Science, University of London, United Kingdom. During her studies, Olivia interned with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Tanzania and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific in Thailand. She was also research assistant to a Member of the United Kingdom Parliament during her graduate studies in London.

Olivia is the recipient of the 2005 Fulbright Professional Business/Industry (Coral Sea) Award.  At NYU School of Law, under the auspices of the Award, Olivia will pursue her interest in international trade agreements. In particular, she will evaluate new trade opportunities for Australian business and the U.S. Government arising from liberalization of the U.S. Government procurement market, pursuant to the recently concluded Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement.

 

Cathryn Costello
Global Emile Noel Fellow
Ireland

Ms. Cathryn Costello holds a BCL from University College Cork, Ireland; a LLM from the College of Europe, Bruges, Belgium; and a BL from the Honorable Society of King's Inns, Ireland. In October 2003, she took up a Senior Research Fellowship in Public and EC Law at Worcester College, Oxford University, United Kingdom. She is currently working on a monograph on EU immigration law. From 1998 to 2003, she was Lecturer in European Law at the Law School, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, where she taught the mandatory general course on EU law as well as advanced courses in various other aspects of EU law and WTO law. From 2000 to 2003, she also held the position of Director of the Irish Centre for European Law. She has published on EU equality, immigration and constitutional law, and has co-edited a major volume on the new equality directives titled Equality in Diversity: The New Equality Directives, ed. Costello and Barry, Dublin: ICEL No 29, 2003.

 

Jean d'Aspremont Lynden
Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow
Belgium

Dr. Jean d’Aspremont Lynden received his PhD from the University of Louvain, Belgium, in August. He received his LLM from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. His doctoral research was devoted to the topic of Non-Democratic States and International Law, a research conducted in an empirical perspective (publication in 2006). He is also the author of various articles in the Revue générale de droit international public (RGDIP) or the Revue belge de droit international (RBDI) on questions pertaining to unilateral acts of States or normativity in International Law. He contributed to the third edition of the commentary of the United Nations Charter as well. Dr. d'Aspremont Lynden has also been a correspondent for the Bulletin of Legal Developments published by the British Institute for International and Comparative Law for several years. At a domestic level, he has written a couple of articles on issues related to the exercise of universal jurisdiction or the relation between international law and municipal law.

Dr. d'Aspremont Lynden has taught International Law at the University of Louvain for 4 years where he has been in charge of seminars and examination. He has also taken part in several conferences where he delivered speeches. At the last research forum of the European Society of International Law (ESIL), he made a contribution on the Creation of Democratic States through International Administration of Territory. In 2004, he was a member of the International Law Seminar (ILS) set up under the auspices of the United Nations International Law Commission. In August 2003, he was a visiting researcher at McGill University, Canada. During the summer of 2005 he was invited by the National Univeristy of Burundi to be a professor of a general course in International Law. As a Global Crystal Eastman Research Fellow at NYU School of Law, he is engaged in a research on the Effects of War on International Treaties.

 

Rabbi David Flatto
Gruss Scholar in Residence
United States of America

Rabbi David Flatto received a BA from Yeshiva University, United States, in 1994. He then continued into law school earning a J.D. from Columbia University School of Law, United States, in 1997. In 1998 he obtained Ordination from Yeshiva University and is currently pursuing a PhD in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, United States. He has written and lectured on Maimonides, Jewish legal philosophy and the critical and historical study of rabbinics.

His current research focuses on the interdisciplinary field of law and Jewish studies, and particularly topics in rabbinic jurisprudence. This research entails analyzing various aspects of the rabbinic judicial system, including issues of legal procedure and governance, as theoretically envisioned and actually implemented in late antiquity. A comparative perspective, assessing the rabbinic system alongside other early imperial and religious legal systems, is also employed in his study.

 

Frank Haldemann
Global Research and Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Fellow
Switzerland

Dr. Frank Haldemann is a Global Research Fellow and Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Fellow. His research encompasses international human rights law, international criminal law, constitutional law, legal history, legal philosophy and bioethics. He is particulary interested in exploring issues at the border between law and ethics. At NYU School of Law, he will work on the question of transitional justice as an emerging field of international law.

In 1999, Dr. Haldemann received his lic.iur., cum laude, from University of Fribourg, Switzerland, after completing a year in the Erasmus Exchange Program at the University of Vienna, Austria. From 1999 to 2001, he worked as a legal researcher for the Independent Commission of Experts: Switzerland–Second World War. In 2002, he obtained his LLM degree in Legal Theory and History, with merit, from the London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom, where he was awarded the British Chevening Scholarship. He wrote a doctoral thesis in the field of legal philosophy and constitutional law titled Responsibility as a Constitutional Principle and, in February 2004, earned his PhD in Law, magna cum laude, from the University of Zurich, Switzerland. In 2003, he became a research assistant/junior lecturer (maître assistant) at the Bioethics Center of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Dr. Haldemann has carried out several research and consulting projects for the Swiss Federal Administration. He is a committee member of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Ethics.

 

Changyin Han
Senior Global Research Fellow
China

Professor Changyin Han is Professor of Law at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University Law School, China. He received his PhD in law from Renmin University of China in 2001. His major fields of research and teaching are bankruptcy law, corporate law and commercial law. Before joining the Shanghai Jiao Tong University faculty, he was dean of the Henan University Law School, China. To date he has published more than 40 academic papers and articles, and chief-authored or co-authored more than ten books on various legal areas.

 

HeXin He
Hauser Research Scholar

Hong Kong

Dr. Xin He is a lecturer in the School of Law, City University of Hong Kong, China. He obtained his LL.B. and LL.M. from Peking University, China, and his J.S.M. and J.S.D. degrees from Stanford University, United States, where he was an Asia-Pacific Scholar. He has published in Law & Society ReviewThe International Journal of the Sociology of LawCanadian Journal of Law and SocietyStanford Journal of International LawColumbia Journal of Asia LawAustralian Journal of Asian Law, and many Chinese journals.

His research interests include legal enforcement, law and court, law in transition economies, and property law. At NYU School of Law, he will conduct empirical research into the Chinese court system, including caseload change, litigants’ confidence toward the courts, and the relation between the courts and enterprises.

 

Chee Youn Hwang
Global Fellow from Government
Republic of South Korea

Dr. Chee Youn Hwang was awarded his Ph.D. in Law at Yonsei University Graduate School, Republic of Korea, in 1996. He received his LL.B. and LL.M. from the same institution in 1985 and 1987, respectively. Since 1996, he has worked as the Constitution Research Officer (career law clerk) at the Constitutional Court of Korea.

In 2001, as a fellowship holder from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, he performed research into a matter of the temporary injunction in the constitutional adjudication at the Institute of Public Law, Bonn University, Germany. In 2003, he participated in the 42nd session of Asian-African Legal Consultative Organization (AALCO) as a delegate of the Republic of Korea.

Dr. Hwang has published numerous articles on a wide range of topics in constitutional law and constitutional litigation law. In 2005, he published recently a collection of poems entitled “A Message to the Revolutionaries” and two books: The History of Korean Constitutional Law and the Right to Life, and The Path Trod by a Constitutional Scholar: What is a Constitution.

 

Krishnachar Nanda Kumar Krishnachar
Hauser Research Scholar

India

Mr. Nanda Kumar Krishnachar has served as a faculty member in law for four years. For the academic year 2004-05 he was a serving on the faculty at Gujarat National Law University, India. His area of interest is environmental law; he has presented his papers in national level seminars and workshops, and has published articles in a variety of journals and web pages on various topics of interest.

Mr. Nanda Kumar Krishnachar was born in the Bangalore District, Karnataka State, India. He completed his schooling in Bangalore and holds a graduation degree (B.A.L.), professional degree (LL.B.) and a post-graduate degree (LL.M.) in Law from, Bangalore University, India. For post-graduation degree in law he focused on environment law. Having been introduced to the subject in post-graduate studies, he now aspires to study and understand environmentalism. With the exposure and experience he received from the past four years of studying the domain of environmental science in various capacities, he has formulated a fundamental hypothesis that all efforts in protecting the environment are in vein because mankind has not ascertained the clear and specific areas of interdependence of regional and global environment.

During his career as an academician, he would like to pursue his studies in the field of the environment in order to plan and coordinate the development of a knowledge bank which provides a basis to understand the intrinsic dependence of various factors in the global environment. A step towards these career objectives is the current proposal for research as a Hauser Research Scholar at NYU School of Law, 'A Study of Regional and International Factors Causing Impediments for Transfer of Safe and Eco-friendly Technology.' 

 

Satoko Kitamura
Global Japanese Federation of Bar Fellow
Japan

Ms. Satoko Kitamura graduated from Keio University, Japan, with an LL.B. degree in 1996 and passed the bar examination in Japan in 1997. After completing the training program of the Judicial Research and Training Center established by the Supreme Court of Japan, she was registered as a lawyer with the Japan Federation of Bar Association (J.F.B.A.) and admitted to the Tokyo Bar Association (T.B.A.) in April 2000.

Ms. Kitamura has created a niche for herself as a legal specialist in human rights for foreigners in Japan. She has been active in defending foreigners against deportation, and her many high profile cases have attracted media coverage and include those for refugees from Afghanistan, an Iranian family, and a young orphaned Thai girl.

Ms. Kitamura has been a vice-chairperson of the “Committee for the Protection of Foreigner Human Rights” of the T.B.A. since April 2002, and in 2003, she was selected as Chairperson of the project team to eradicate the harassment of the children of Koreans living in Japan.

Ms. Kitamura became a member of the Committee of Human Rights Protection of the J.F.B.A. in 2003. In January 2004, after joining the executive committee of the J.F.B.A., she was involved in drafting the Fundamental Law for Human Rights for Foreigners and in charge of planning the J.F.B.A. Symposium, which was held in October 2004 with the aim of enacting the law.

 

Dr. Shahar Lifshitz
Berkowitz Fellow
Israel

Dr. Shahar Lifshitz is a senior lecturer, Faculty of Law, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. He received a Bachelor Degree in Law and Psychology from Bar-Ilan University in 1996, and his PhD in Law from the same institution in 2002. His doctoral dissertation, which received a distinction, is titled Contractual Regulation of Spousal Relationship in Civil Law. Dr. Lifshitz's areas of academic interest are contractual law and family law especially the philosophical basis of these fields. In 2004, he won the Alon scholarship for the "excellent scientist," awarded by the Higher Council for Academic Studies in Israel which fully sponsors young scholars in their university positions for three years. In 2005, he won the Rothschild Fellowship for post-doctorate program as well as the Fulbright Award.

Dr. Lifshitz is a researcher in the Israeli Institute for Democracy, which advances a process of legislation for an accepted constitution for Israel. His specific task is to suggest a version for a law which will regulate the registration of secular spouses in Israel to the civil spousal register. He participates in the meetings of the legislative committee of the "Kneset" and counseling of the legislators in family law issues. He is Legislative Committee Member of the Ministry of Justice on the Israeli law for the rights of children. He lectures at seminars for judges and lawyers in the fields of family law and contract law. Finally, Dr. Lifshitz was appointed to a judge of the special court of adhesion contracts

Recently, his first book Cohabitation Law in Israel from the Perspective of a Civil Law Theory of the Family, written in Hebrew and published by Haifa University Press in 2005, was awarded The Bahat Prize. Dr. Lifshitz is currently editing his second book Civil Regulation of Spousal Regulation for publication by The Harry and Michael Institute for Legislative Research and Comparative Law, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. His publication list includes, among others:

"The Future of Secular Family Law in the Next Fifty Years: Classical Liberalism vs. Commuinitarian Liberalism," Bar-Ilan Law Studies 17 (1) 2001 159.

"A Civil Reorientation in Israeli Family Law," ed. By Prof. Yedidia Z. Stern & Dr. Yaffa Zilbershats, Tzivyon (3) 2002.

"Equality in Marriage, the Right to Divorce and Autonomy of Communitarian–," Tel Aviv University Law Review, 27 2003, 139. (Hebrew)

"The External Rights of Cohabitations," Israel Law Review, 37 (2) 346.

At NYU School of Law, he will work on projects in the subjects of cohabitation law and property relationship between spouses as well as on project deals with "Unconscionability Contracts: A Jewish Law Perspective."

 

Rufus Pichler
Global Engelberg Fellow from Practice
Germany

Mr. Rufus Pichler is currently on leave from his position as an attorney in the Technology Transactions Group of Morrison & Foerster LLP in San Francisco. His practice at Morrison & Foerster focuses primarily on commercial transactions involving intellectual property, including among other things patent, know-how, and other license agreements, as well as development, manufacturing, supply, distribution, and other transactions in the technology and life sciences industries.

Mr. Pichler has specific experience in international intellectual property and commercial law including European Union and German law. He is admitted to practice in California and in Germany and has assisted clients from Asia, Australia, Europe, and the United States in various international transactions. In 2004 and 2005 Mr. Pichler served as adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law where he taught International Intellectual Property Law.

Before joining Morrison & Foerster, from 1997 to 1999, Mr. Pichler held a research and teaching position at the Institute for Information, Telecommunications, and Media Law, University of Muenster, Germany, a leading academic institution in the field of Intellectual Property and Information Law. Among other things, Mr. Pichler taught classes on international intellectual property law, electronic commerce, and legal aspects of the information society. He published several articles and is a frequent speaker on IP/IT subjects. Mr. Pichler is the author of the chapter on international jurisdiction in one of Germany’s leading treatises on online and multimedia law ("Handbuch Multimedia-Recht") and also wrote a book on the law of electronic payment systems.

Mr. Pichler received his J.D. from the University of Freiburg, Germany, in 1995. He also received a J.S.M. (Master of the Science of Law) from Stanford Law School, United States, in 2000.

 

Julie Ringelheim
Global Research and Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Fellow
Belgium

Dr. Julie Ringelheim has been a researcher at the Center of Philosophy of Law of the Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, since 2003. In 1998, she graduated with a degree in law from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, and was awarded an LLM in 1999 from Trinity Hall College, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, where she specialized in international law and jurisprudence. Between 1999 and 2005, she wrote her PhD thesis at the European University Institute, Italy, on Cultural Diversity in the European Court of Human Rights’ Case Law. She also was a visiting researcher at the University of Paris XI in Spring 2003. Her areas of interests include international human rights law, minority protection, anti-discrimination law, public international law, legal and political theory.

Her current research focuses on the tension between the promotion of equality and the protection of personal data. It is based on a comparative study of the legislation and policies adopted by the U.S. and several European countries to combat racial, ethnic or religious discrimination in the fields of employment, education and housing. The project seeks to define ways in which the sometimes conflicting imperatives of the affirmative pursuance of equality and the protection of personal data may be reconciled.

 

Tracy Robinson
Mauro Cappelletti Global Fellow in Comparative Law
Jamaica

Ms. Tracy Robinson is Jamaican and received her LLB in 1991 from the University of the West Indies, Cavehill Campus, Barbados. In 1994 she received her B.C.L. from Balliol College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and one year later her LLM from Yale Law School, United States. She returned to the Faculty of Law, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, as a lecturer in 1996. At UWI she teaches family law, gender and the law, constitutional law and human rights law, and, until recently, was the editor of the Caribbean Law Bulletin.

In her research and publications, she has been most concerned with questions of gender, citizenship and constitutionalism, gender-based violence, and family law reform in the Caribbean. She has been involved with a number of regional initiatives that have family law and family policy reform in mind, including the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States Family Law and Domestic Violence Judicial and Legislative Reform Project and the UNIFEM/UWI Child Support, Poverty and Family Responsibilities Research Project in the Caribbean. She is also a member of the Barbados Family Law Council and a member of a Barbados women's advocacy group established in 2003 to press for legislation dealing with sexual harassment.

 

Benjamin Straumann
Global Research Fellow
Alberico Gentili Fellow in the Program in the History and Theory of International Law
Switzerland

Dr. Benjamin Straumann completed his doctoral dissertation (insigni cum laude) on the classical foundations of Hugo Grotius' natural and international law in 2005 at the University of Zurich after studies in Zurich and Rome. He is currently a Global Research Fellow in the Hauser Global Law School Program. He is also an Alberico Gentili Fellow in the Program in the History and Theory of International Law. Previously, Benjamin has worked for the Swiss Mission to the United Nations and was a Visiting Scholar at Columbia University. His research interests include the history of natural and international law, natural rights and social contract theories as well as the early modern reception of classical antiquity.

His publications include "'Ancient Caesarian Lawyers' in a State of Nature: Roman Tradition and Natural Rights in Hugo Grotius' De iure praedae," Political Theory (forthcoming); "The Right to Punish as a Just Cause of War in Hugo Grotius' Natural Law," Studies in the History of Ethics (forthcoming); and an article on Rome and her influence in modern culture and scholarship in Brill's New Pauly. Encyclopaedia of the Ancient World, ed. M. Landfester (Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, forthcoming).

 

Michal Tamir
Global Research Fellow
Israel

Dr. Michal Tamir graduated in 1995 with her LLB, magna cum laude, from the University of Haifa, Israel. She then became a clerk for Israeli Supreme Court Justice Itzhak Zamir. After her admission to the Israeli Bar, she served a short time as a legal assistant in the Supreme Court. In 1999, she received her LLM, summa cum laude, from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and, in 2005, her LL.D. from the same institution. The topic of her doctoral dissertation is Selective Enforcement. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Shaárei Mishpat College of Law, Israel.

Throughout her studies Dr. Tamir has won numerious prizes. Among the courses she currently teaches are Administrative Law, Criminal Procedure, Law of Tenders, Human Rights in Private Law, Equality in Law, and Freedom of Occupation. Her main work focuses on issues concerning administrative and constitutional law. She published several articles in the leading Israeli law journals, and wrote the entry "Israel" for an international encyclopedia.

 

Eyal Zamir
Senior Global Research Fellow
Israel

Professor Eyal Zamir was born in 1961 in Moshav Hayogev, Israel. He holds an LLB (1982) and Dr.Jur. (1989) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. After spending one year at Harvard Law School as a Visiting Researcher (1990-91), he was appointed Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University. In 1996-97 he was a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. In 1998 he became full professor and in the same year was appointed Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law at the Hebrew University; he then served as Dean of the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University from 2002 to 2005.

Professor Zamir’s research interests include contract law and contract theory, economic analysis of law, and proprietary aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. He authored or edited ten books and published more than twenty articles in Israeli and American law reviews, including The American Journal of International Law, the Columbia Law Review, and the Virginia Law Review.

Since 1987, Professor Zamir has been a member of the Israeli Codification of Private Law Committee, headed by Chief Justice Aharon Barak. In 1995 he participated in the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations on the Interim Agreement concerning the West Bank and Gaza Strip ("Oslo B"). In 2004-05 he chaired a Committee (appointed by Israel’s Attorney General) that examined the Land Registry in the West Bank.

Professor Zamir has been awarded numerous fellowships and awards, including the Y. Sussman Law Prize (1988) and the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar named after Y. Ben Porat (1994, first recipient).

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Academic Year 2004-2005

 

Baykal Sanem Baykal
Hauser Research Scholar

Turkey

Dr. Sanem Baykal was born in Ankara, Turkey in 1969. She obtained her LL.B. in 1990 from Ankara University, Law Faculty and her LL.M. in European Law from University of London in 1994 with the Jean Monnet Scholarship of the European Commission. In 2001 she received her Ph.D. from Ankara University in European Union Law. During her Ph.D. studies she conducted research in Queen Mary College, University of London due to the award she received from Turkish Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Sanem Baykal is Assistant Professor of European Union Law at Ankara University, Faculty of Law since November 2003. Prior to her appointment she was a research assistant at the European Studies Department of Ankara University, Institute of Social Sciences.

 

Dr. Baykal has published articles, book chapters and monographs mainly on EU Institutional/Constitutional Law and Turkey-EU Relations. Her current fields of research are constitutionalization process, legitimacy and democratic deficit in the European Union. Among her most recent works, an article entitled "Significance of the Charter of Fundamental Rights in Context of the Emerging European Polity" in Maria Gavouneli and Vangelis Kyriakopoulos (eds.), Olympia III: Human Rights in the 21 st Century, Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers, Athens, 2003 and her paper presented in the ECSA-C 6th Biennial Conference "A Constitution for Europe? Governance and Policy Making in the European Union" in Montreal, Canada on 27-29 May 2004 can be cited. She is also the co-author of the book chapter "Turkey-European Union Relations: 1990-2001" in Baskin Oran (ed.), Turkish Foreign Policy, Vol. II, Iletisim Publications, Istanbul, 2001, with Professor Tugrul Arat.

 

Alexander Boraine
Senior Global Research Fellow
South Africa

Dr. Alexander Boraine was born and educated in Cape Town, South Africa. He was awarded his PhD at Drew University Graduate School.

He was a member of the opposition Progressive Party in South Africa's Parliament for 12 years before resigning to establish a non-governmental organization which focused on promoting negotiation politics. In 1995, he was appointed by President Nelson Mandela as Vice Chairperson of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

In 2001, he was appointed President of the International Center for Transitional Justice in New York and is now the Chairperson. In 1999, he was appointed Professor of Law at the NYU School of Law and is now a Visiting Professor at the Law School.