Past Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Below please find a listing of the past Visiting Doctoral Researchers from the years 2004 through 2012. Additionally, you may view the biographical information of our current Global Research Fellows and Global Fellows from Practice & Government.

2011-2012 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Gonçalo Coelho
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Portugal

Gonçalo Coelho is a third year Law PhD Candidate at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy (EUI) and Assistant at the EU Energy Law & Policy Area of the Florence School of Regulation. Gonçalo’s research interests cover Competition, State aid and Regulatory Law and his doctoral studies focus on access to natural resources in network industries.

Before joining the EUI, Gonçalo worked as a Lawyer at the Lisbon office of Cuatrecasas, Gonçaloves Pereira between 2003 and 2006 and as a Legal Officer at the Portuguese Council of Ministers and Ministry for Public Works and Communications between 2006 and 2007. He has also worked as a Lawyer at the Brussels Office of White & Case (2008/2009).

Gonçalo holds a Law Degree and Post-Graduations in Competition and Regulation Law (2006/2007) and Law Making and Science of the Legislation (2004) from the Lisbon University. He also holds an LLM from the EUI (2009/2010) and an LLM specializing in “European Law and Economic Analysis” from the College of Europe in Bruges, (2007/2008).

Gonçalo’s doctoral research is supervised by Prof. Giorgio Monti at the EUI. He was a Fulbright-Schuman student during his time as a Visiting Doctoral Researcher at NYU.

 

Xiuyan Fei
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
China

Xiuyan Fei is a PhD candidate at University College Dublin under the supervision of Professor Joseph McMahon and at Renmin University of China under the supervision of Professor YIN Li. During the academic year of 2009-2010, she was research assistant to Professor YIN Li at the school of law of Renmin University of China.She used to work at DLA Piper UK LLP Beijing Representative Office in the field of venture capital as legal assistant in 2008 and at North China Electric Power University as teaching assistant from 2003 to 2006. She has publications of “Comment on the Case: Salem Steel North America LLC v. Shanghai Shangshang Stainless Pipe Co., Ltd.,” 30(4) International Business Research 4 (2009) (with GONG Bai-hua) and “Comment on the Case: United States - Anti-Dumping Measure on Shrimp from Ecuador,” 17 Law Journal of RUC 123 (2007).

Xiuyan's research interest is in international trade law, especially in WTO law. Her thesis is National Law Interpretation in EU, WTO, and NAFTA.

 

Lisa Ginsborg
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United Kingdom

Lisa Ginsborg is a third year Law PhD candidate at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy, working under the supervision of Prof. Martin Scheinin. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the UN Security Council, counter-terrorism and human rights after 9/11, looking specifically at the implications of the work of the UN Counter-Terrorism Committee and the 1267 Sanctions Committee on international human rights standards.

Before starting her PhD Lisa worked for three years in the legal department of the International Secretariat of Amnesty International (2006-2009). She has also worked at the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) (2005-2006). Lisa holds an LLM in Comparative, European and International Laws from the European University Institute (EUI) and an MSc in Political Sociology from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Her first degree in Philosophy and Sociology was obtained from the University of Sussex, where she was awarded the University Prize in Philosophy.

 

Krisztina Huszti Orban
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Switzerland/ Romania

Krisztina Huszti Orban is a PhD candidate in international law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, where she is working on a doctoral thesis entitled ‘The Concept of Armed Conflict in International Humanitarian Law’. During her residency at NYU School of Law, her research will focus on the impact of armed external intervention on the classification of armed conflicts and the law applicable thereto.

Krisztina has earned an LLB from the Babes-Bolyai University (Cluj Napoca, Romania), an LLM in comparative legal and political studies from the Andrassy Gyula German University Budapest and a Master in Advanced Studies (LLM) in international humanitarian law from the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights.

Her research interests include international humanitarian law, protection of human rights during armed conflict and state of emergency, international law relating to the use of force as well as legal aspects of security sector reform and governance.

Krisztina has previously worked with the United Nations Office of Amnesty International in Geneva, the Fundamental Rights Agency of the European Union, the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF).
She is a member of the Swiss Branch of the International Law Association and an alternate member of the ILA Committee on the Use of Force.

 

Pedro Caro de Sousa
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Portugal

Pedro Caro de Sousa is a DPhil candidate at Lady Margaret Hall at the University of Oxford. His doctoral thesis focuses on the interplay between normative and institutional considerations to be found in judicial decisions concerning economic constitutional provisions in federal, co-federal and transnational settings. In his work, Pedro focuses mainly on free movement provisions in the EU setting to demonstrate the dynamic interaction between purely theoretical considerations and the institutional setting where the relevant adjudicatory bodies operate.

Pedro obtained his law degree at Universidade Nova de Lisboa in 2005. From 2002 to 2004 he worked for the Judge’s Support Cabinet at the Portuguese Constitutional Court. Pedro is also a Portuguese qualified lawyer, and from 2005 to 2008 he worked at Linklaters as an attorney, focusing mainly on EU and Competition law. At Oxford, Pedro has tutored Competition Law to undergraduates in the capacity of a Graduate Teaching Assistant, and tutored EU law at King’s College London in the capacity of Visiting Tutor.

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2010-2011 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Sanja Bogojevic
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Sweden

Sanja Bogojevic is a DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis focuses on emissions trading schemes with particular reference to the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). In her work, Sanja analyses the interplay between states and markets in emissions trading regimes, and explores the intersections between administrative and environmental law in this regard.

Sanja's thesis is published in part in the Journal of Environmental Law (2009) and in a collection of essays on environmental discourses (CUP, forthcoming). Further, two pieces analyzing legislative developments of the EU ETS are published in the Environmental Law Review and Carbon and Climate Law Review (both forthcoming), and a chapter on EU law in a Swedish law textbook (Rättskunskap 2005).

Sanja attained her LLB with German Law from King's College, London and Passau University in 2005, and her LLM from College of Europe, Bruges in 2007. At Oxford, Sanja has tutored EU Law to undergraduates at Balliol and Oriel colleges in the capacity of a GTA, and on her return to Oxford from NYU, she will teach an undergraduate and graduate course in Comparative Environmental Law. Sanja has also been a research visitor at the Max Plank Institute for Collective Goods in Bonn (sponsored by DAAD), and an invited speaker at conferences at for example the Australian National University in Canberra and British Institute of International Comparative Law in London.

During her research visit to NYU, Sanja was affiliated with the Center for Environmental Law and Land Use Law with Professor Katrina Wyman as her sponsor.

Tanya Josev
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Australia

Tanya has degrees in law and arts from the University of Melbourne and is a former editor of the Melbourne University Law Review. After graduating, Tanya worked for several years as a commercial litigation lawyer at Allens Arthur Robinson, and in late 2007 commenced a 16-month period as the associate/clerk of Justice Alan Goldberg AO of the Federal Court of Australia. In 2009, she was awarded an Australian Postgraduate Award to commence cross-disciplinary doctoral studies in law and political history at the University of Melbourne; she was also appointed one of the Law School’s inaugural PhD Teaching Fellows. She currently lectures in Corporations Law and the Law of Obligations in the Law School, and has previously published in related areas.

Tanya’s doctoral studies focus on the history of the public debate on judicial method in Australia, and the migration of legal and constitutional theories from and between the United States and Australia. Tanya’s doctoral research is supervised by Laureate Professors Stuart Macintyre and Cheryl Saunders at the University of Melbourne, and at NYU she was sponsored by Professor Barry Friedman during her time as a Global Fellow.

Machiko Kanetake
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Japan

Machiko Kanetake is a PhD candidate at Kyoto University (Japan) where she is a JSPS Research Fellow. Her areas of expertise include United Nations law and international security law. Her doctoral thesis examines the regulation of the UN Security Council’s authority exercised vis-à-vis non-state actors. Having studied international politics as an undergraduate at Aoyama Gakuin University (Japan), she has earned her English law degree (MA in Law) from the University of Sheffield (UK) where she received International Scholarships. She has sharpened her research focus on UN law through her LLM at the London School of Economics and Political Science (UK). She has publications on the use of force to protect nationals abroad, UN peacekeeping and the judicial review of the UN Security Council, including: “Whose Zero Tolerance Counts? Reassessing a Zero Tolerance Policy against Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN Peacekeepers” (2010) 17 International Peacekeeping 200; and “Enhancing Community Accountability of the Security Council through Pluralistic Structure: The Case of the 1267 Committee” (2008) 12 Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law 113.

Jason Pobjoy
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Australia

Jason Pobjoy is currently reading for a PhD at the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Dr Guglielmo Verdirame. He is the recipient of a W.M. Tapp Studentship in Law and a Poynton Cambridge Australia Scholarship. Jason’s research explores the relationship between international refugee law and international law on the rights of the child, in the context of children seeking international protection.

Jason is an Australian qualified lawyer, and practised for three years as a litigation solicitor at Mallesons Stephen Jaques. He completed a Masters in Law at the University of Melbourne under the supervision of Professor James C. Hathaway and Dr. Michelle Foster, and the Bachelor of Civil Law at the University of Oxford as a Commonwealth Scholar. In July 2010 Jason will took up a 3-month post as a Research Associate at the Refugee Law Project at Makarere University in Kampala, which will act as a base for fieldwork in refugee camps in Uganda, Kenya and Egypt.

While at NYU Jason worked under the supervision of Professor Philip Alston.

Maria Tzanaou
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Greece

Maria Tzanou is a PhD Candidate at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Her doctoral thesis focuses on EU counter-terrorism measures in the area of Freedom, Security and Justice and their implications on privacy and data protection. She holds a Master degree in Comparative, European and International Law by the EUI, a Master II in “Specialized Public Law” by the Universities of Athens and Bordeaux IV, and an LLM in European Law by the University of Cambridge. Her first law degree was obtained at the Law School of Athens, where she graduated with honors equivalent to Summa Cum Laude (ranked 1st in class and top student in the Law School). She has published articles in the German Law Journal and the Yearbook of European Law, and has written (as a co-author) three reports for the EU Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA). She speaks fluent Greek, English, French, German and Italian.

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2009-2010 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Rabeea Assy
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Israel

Rabeea studied at the University of Haifa where he read for his LLB and LLM. (He graduated with honors equivalent to Summa Cum Laude, ranked 1st in class). In 2000 Rabeea was called to the Israeli Bar, and in 2003 he was admitted to the Criminal Department in the Attorney General Office (Nazareth District). In 2007 he set out to read for his DPhil in Law at Oxford University under Professor Adrian Zuckerman of University College, Oxford. In Oxford Rabeea was a co-editor and then the editor-in-chief of the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal. In 2004 Rabeea published (as a co-author) two articles at the Hebrew University Law Journal (Jerusalem), leveling criticism of the Israeli case-law for excessive and unjustified reliance on the evidence of facial identification of defendants in criminal proceedings. This criticism has generally been endorsed by the Israeli Supreme Court leading it to revise its previous position and take a more suspicious stance to the facial identification evidence in criminal proceedings. His LLM (2006) thesis explored the nature of heightened standards of proof in civil cases and offered an innovative theoretical model to explain its meaning, combining together different types of approaches and methods of reasoning (mathematical, inductive, and holistic). For his DPhil, Rabeea currently focuses on the theoretical foundations of the right of access to court and their particular implications for self-represented litigants and “vexatious litigants.” Rabeea also has general interest in theology (with particular emphasis on Christianity), Arabic poetry, English literature, and chess.

Email: rabeea.assy@gmail.com.
Yun-I Kim
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Germany

Yun-I Kim is a PhD candidate at the University of Potsdam, Faculty of Law under the supervision of Professor Dr. Markus Krajewski. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the area of international investment arbitration, in particular on the conflict arising from coexisting dispute settlement mechanisms in international investment agreements and investment contracts. Ms. Kim graduated from Cologne University Law School in 2006 where she was a scholar of the German National Academic Foundation. She is a case assistant to Professor Dr. Karl-Heinz Böckstiegel and has been designated Secretary to the Tribunal in various international arbitration proceedings. She also works as research assistant in the leading German law firm in the field of international investment arbitration. Prior to that she was a research assistant to Professor Dr. Stephan Hobe at the Institute of Air and Space Law and the Chair for Public International Law, European and International Economic Law, University of Cologne where she also lectured on contracts and constitutional law. Ms. Kim is a member of the Advisory Board of the Institute for Transnational Arbitration and has published various articles in the field of air law and investment law. She speaks fluent English, French, Korean, and Spanish. During her stay at NYU she was affiliated with the Institute of International Law and Justice with Professor Benedict Kingsbury as her sponsor.
Nils Christian Langtevdt
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Norway

Mr. Langtvedt is a research fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo (UiO). His PhD-thesis examines the WTO Appellate Body’s method of interpretation and seeks to analyze the relationship between the tribunal’s rhetoric and the impact of the results, supervised by Dr. Marius Emberland. He is also a lecturer in Public international law and International Economic Law.Previously, Mr. Langtvedt worked as an associate lawyer at Selmer Advokatfirma DA, and he wrote his masters’ thesis on bilateral investment treaties while being employed as a research assistant at the Department of Public and International Law, UiO (2007). He was selected as a Fulbright Fellow for the 2009-2010 academic year to stay at NYU. During his residency, Mr. Langtvedt continued the work of his PhD-thesis with a particular focus on the teleology and implicit hermeneutics of the Appellate Body. His sponsor at NYU was Professor Robert Howse.
Lucas Lixinski
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Italy

Lucas Lixinski is currently a PhD Researcher at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy), where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Legal Studies in 2008. He has completed his Master’s Degree in Human Rights at Central European University (Budapest, Hungary), with a Specialization in European and Global Legal Practice (Total Law Program, NYU/CEU). His first law degree was obtained in Brazil, at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. He has been a visiting researcher at Columbia University School of Law (New York, USA) in the spring of 2007, and participated in an exchange program at the University of Texas School of Law in the spring of 2005. He has clerked at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in the fall of 2005 (with a grant from the University of Texas School of Law). His PhD research deals with the legal aspects for the protection of intangible cultural heritage (folklore), and his other research interests include international human rights law, general public international law and the law of regional economic integration. He is a co-editor of a book on the Law of MERCOSUR (Hart Publishing, forthcoming 2009), among other publications.
Miriam Rodgers
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United States

Miriam Rodgers is a DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor John Gardner. Her work on legal philosophy focuses on the forms of justice as they are applied in various areas of law. Ms. Rodgers studied philosophy and economics as an undergraduate at Washington and Lee University (2004) and earned her JD from the University of Texas, Austin (2007). At Oxford, Ms. Rodgers taught undergraduate Land Law as part of the University’s Graduate Teaching Assistantship scheme for 2008-2009. She has also been selected to teach undergraduate Jurisprudence as the University’s GTA upon her return to Oxford in the spring of 2010.

Andrew Woods
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United States

Andrew K. Woods is a PHD candidate at Cambridge University (Politics) where he is a Gates Scholar. His thesis examines the implications of social science experiments about human behavior for the international human rights regime. He is author of “A Behavioral Approach to Human Rights” (Harvard International Law Journal, forthcoming) and co-editor (along with Profs Ryan Goodman and Derek Jinks) of Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). He is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where he was also a Hauser Fellow.

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2008-2009 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Vanessa Abballe
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
France

A graduate of La Sorbonne Law School with a double major in private and public law, Vanessa Abballe specialized both in international private law and European law. Following her law degree, she obtained a Master's in the theory and law of trial under the direction of Loic Cadiet at La Sorbonne Law School. With a strong knowledge of civil procedure, she passed the Paris bar and worked in a French law firm specializing in international law and project finance. In parallel, she completed a Master's in political science from Pantheon-Assas Paris II and worked as a congressional staffer at the French Parliament, during which time she participated in several congressional inquiries concerning legal reforms. Vanessa subsequently attended the University of Michigan where she obtained her LLM degree.

Following her LLM, Vanessa stayed at the University of Michigan as a research scholar and during this period, she was appointed as a Jean Monet Graduate Fellowship on issues of European integration, of the European Union Commission in collaboration with the European center studies of the University of Michigan focusing her research on the federal aspect of the vertical articulation of the interjurisdictional relations from a comparative point of view between the American and European systems.

Vanessa is now working on her PhD in Law under the co-direction of Professor Loic Cadiet from La Sorbonne Law School and Professor Robert Howse from the NYU Law School. Her research focuses on the comparative approaches of European law and American law, particularly concerning interstate private law. She has published several articles on the impact of the globalization of justice.

Her research during her stay at NYU focused on the impact of the expansion of the scope and the function of private international law in an environment of globalized justice and scrutinize the development of international and regional adjudicative authorities and their impact on the interjurisdictional interactions of international and domestic systems, demonstrating how the increasing overlapping of different levels of adjudicatory power requires the establishment of supranational procedural standards in order to maintain legal certainty, particularly considering the decline in influence of nation-states within the international arena.

Nuhaila Carmouche
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Scotland

Nuhaila is a Visiting Doctoral Researcher on exchange from the European University Institute (Florence, Italy). Nuhaila is writing a thesis on the "Conceptual Aspects of Global Administrative Law" Prior to beginning her doctoral research at the EUI, Nuhaila completed her LLM at the University of Cambridge. Nuhaila has conducted research for a number of organizations including the Foundation of International and Environmental Law and the British Institute for International and Comparative Law. She also acted as the editorial assistant for the publication: “September 11 2001: A Turning Point for International and Domestic Law.”

Thibaut Fleury
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
France

Mr. Fleury is a PhD student at the University of Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, France. He is the recipient of a three-year fellowship from the French Ministry of Education and Research and an assistant professor of Public Law at the University of Versailles-Saint-Quentin. Mr. Fleury, who has been awarded prices in Constitutional Law (2002) and History of Political Philosophy (2005) during his Public Law studies at University Strasbourg III-Robert Schuman (France), holds a DEA of "Philosophy of Law" from the University Paris II.

Mr. Fleury's Dissertation for his DEA on the "Law of Nations in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s thought ", was published in 2006 by the Michel Villey from the Institute for Philosophy of Law and Legal Culture. He chose to deepen his research on the development of International Law by writing a thesis on territorial issues in the United States, and their contribution to the development of International Law. Parallel to his thesis work Mr. Fleury is a regular contributer to the Revue Trimestrielle de Droit Européen, a French European Law Review.

During his stay at NYU, he worked with Prof. Benedict Kingsbury from the Institute for International Law and Justice on the links between territory, federation and International Law and on the legal status of U.S. territories and Indian land.

Bram Goetschalckx
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Belgium

Bram Goetschalckx is a philosopher working and living in Antwerp, Belgium. He has spent his young career at the University of Antwerp, where he graduated in philosophy with a study on ‘humanist’ philosophy of mathematics, and was awarded a research scholarship at the law school under the guidance of professor Maurice Adams. He has taught courses on philosophy of law at the department of philosophy of Antwerp and the law school of Tilburg University. With the support of Dr. Nicos Stavropoulos, he was ‘Recognized Student’ at the University of Oxford for the Hilary Term 2008, where he participated in the jurisprudence program.

His doctoral research focuses on the (philosophical) methodology of jurisprudence and argues for a hermeneutical or interpretive account of philosophy of law vis-à-vis positivist and pragmatic conceptions of jurisprudence. His interests are mainly in philosophical method, pragmatism, interpretation and tradition. A future ambition is to include theological scholarship in his study of law and hermeneutics.

Bram is a member of the Legal Theory Research Group of the University of Antwerp. His sponsor at NYU was professor Mattias Kumm.

Devika Hovell
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Australia

Ms. Hovell is a DPhil Candidate at the University of Oxford. Her thesis examines whether it is possible to construct a procedural fairness framework applicable to Security Council decision-making on sanctions, considering normative foundations for the framework, institutional limitations, and applicable standards of fair treatment.

Prior to commencing her doctorate, Ms. Hovell was a lecturer in international law at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, and a director of a 3-year project exploring the relationship between international law and the Australian legal system. Together with her project partners, she produced a book, an edited book and numerous journal articles. Prior to this, she was a judicial clerk to the judges on the International Court of Justice, legal assistant to Professor Pellet at the UN International Law Commission and a judicial clerk to Justice Hayne on the High Court of Australia. Ms. Hovell has a Master of Laws from New York University.

Her visit to NYU was sponsored by Professor Richard Stewart.

Elisa Maria Lotz
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Germany

Ms. Elisa Maria Lotz is fellow of the graduate program “Multilevel Constitutionalism: European Experiences and Global Perspectives” at Humboldt University in Berlin under supervision of Professor Pernice and Professor Nolte. Her PhD thesis deals with “The Judicial Control of UN Security Council Sanctions against Individuals – an Analysis in the Light of the Rule of Law”. In a comparative approach she explores how notions of the Rule of Law prevailing on different legal levels are influenced by sanctions of the Security Council against individuals.

During her studies of law at Bucerius Law School in Hamburg and Université Panthéon-Sorbonne in Paris Ms. Elisa Maria Lotz focussed on Public International Law, but also exploring the field of International Relations during her stay in Paris. She gained internship experience at the German Technical Cooperation in Beijing where she worked in the advisory service to the legal reform in China. At the Permanent Mission of Germany to NATO in Brussels she dealt with NATO aspirants and the implementation of rule of law and democracy standards. Ms. Lotz published on the future role of the EU and NATO in defense and security policy.

Timor Pesso
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Israel

Mr. Pesso received his LLB degree, summa cum laude, in 1999 from the Hebrew University, Israel. In 2000 he received his MBA degree, magna cum laude, from the Hebrew University School of Business Administration, and in 2004 he received his LLM degree, magna cum laude, from the Hebrew University. From 2000 to 2006 Mr. Pesso served as an officer (attaining the rank of a Major) in the Military Advocacy of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF).

Mr. Pesso was the recipient of several awards and scholarships, among them a Fulbright Scholarship, the Hebrew University award for outstanding students participating in interdisciplinary programs, the Dean’s award for Outstanding Academic Achievements and the IDF Military Advocate General's Award for Excellence.

Mr. Pesso is currently studying for his PhD at the Hebrew University School of Law, where he is also a research fellow. His research, which is advised by Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, is primarily concerned with the dynamics of urban renewal, particularly innovative legal mechanisms to address the difficulties, both social and economic, inherent to this process in order to improve the chances of success. His sponsor at NYU was Professor Katrina Wyman.

Rene Uruena
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Spain

René Uruena is a Research Fellow and doctoral candidate at the Centre of Excellence in Global Governance Research at the University of Helsinki, where he also lectures on international law. He graduated as a lawyer from the Universidad de Los Andes (Colombia), holds an LLM (laudatur) in international law (University of Helsinki), and a postgraduate degree in economics (Universidad de Los Andes – Colombia). His publications include the first textbook of international organizations law written in Latin America, as well as several other articles published in international peer-reviewed journals.

During his residency, Mr. Uruena’s research will continue to explore how the prominence of trade law affects the parameters of political participation and democratic decision-making. Political man is becoming a ‘market citizen’: a human being that politically exists only inasmuch as he is economically active—to what extent does the international trade regime contribute to the construction of these developments? He worked with Benedict Kingsbury at the Institute for International Law and Justice.

Mila Versteeg
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Dutch

Mila Versteeg is doctoral student in law at the University of Oxford, where she is Gregory Kulkes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford, and holds an Arts and Humanities Research Council Award. In 2007 she obtained her LLM- degree from Harvard Law School. She previously worked as an intern at the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute in Turin and at the Southern Africa Litigation Centre in Johannesburg.

Mila’s main research interests are in comparative constitutional law and international human rights law. She also specializes in empirical legal studies. Her research in mainly quantitative and focuses on the origins and effects of both domestic and international rights regimes.

Pauline Abadie
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
France

Ms. Abadie is a PhD student at University Paris I-La Sorbonne (France) and a research associate at the Center of Environmental, Land Use and Urban Law (CERDEAU)where she is contributing to a research project ordered by the CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research) and the Department of Justice on the globalization of environmental law. As a member of the team, she describes new models of law-making and focuses more specifically on the mechanisms of harmonization in environmental reporting and accounting law. She is also the recipient of a three-year fellowship from the French Ministry of Education and Research and an assistant professor of US constitutional law at the University Paris X-Nanterre. Ms. Abadie holds an LLM in environmental law from Golden Gate University (2003), and a D.E.A in environmental law from the University Paris I-La Sorbonne (2005). While in California, her research and teaching interest was on human rights and the environment. She published an article advocating the use of U.S. domestic law instruments to litigate environmental injustices in developing countries. She joined the team of an environmental public interest law firm where her work focused on human rights violations connected to the US-funded Plan Colombia aerial coca fumigation campaign. In the spring 2004, she was the co-teacher of a seminar on environmental justice at Golden Gate University. During her stay, she worked with Richard Stewart on her research proposal entitled “The Globalization of Environmental Law Through the Mechanisms of Harmonization in Environmental Reporting and Accounting Law.”


Gaspar Atienza
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Spain

Mr. Gaspar Atienza graduated with a degree in Law and a diploma in Business Administration from the Universidad Pontificia Comillas (ICADE), in Madrid, Spain, in 1998. In 2000 Mr. Atienza graduated from the School of International and Public Affairs of Columbia University with a Master's degree in International Relations, while working at the European Delegation at the United Nations. In September 2000 Mr. Atienza joined the Financial Law Department of Spain’s largest Law Firm, Garrigues Abogados, and since then has combined the practice of private financial Law with the study of International Public Law, International Relations and regular academic and journalistic contributions in Spanish universities and media.

Since 2003 Mr. Atienza has been studying at the Fundacion Ortega y Gasset attached to the Universidad Autonoma of Madrid in his PhD on International Public Law and International Relations, and is focusing his doctoral dissertation on the relation of power and law in the international order and the influence of the so called "democratic norm" on non-democratic states.

Conway Blake
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Jamaica

Mr. Blake originally hails from Jamaica, but is currently pursuing his PhDin International Law at the University of Cambridge, England. In 2004, Mr. Blake received his Bachelor's of Law (LLB) with first class honors from the University of the West Indies (Caribbean). He later received a Commonwealth scholarship, and completed his Masters in International Law (LLM) at the University of Cambridge, with first class honors . Mr. Blake has lectured in the areas of human rights and family law at the University level in both the Caribbean and the United Kingdom. In addition, he has been actively involved in human rights NGOs and other advocacy initiatives related to social justice issues. During his year in residency, he will be working on his proposal entitled "Supra-national Adjudication and the Realization of Socioeconomic Rights: Examining the Optional Protocol to the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights" with his faculty sponsor Philip Alston and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice.

Sara Dezalay
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
France

Of dual nationality heritage, French and Irish, Sara Dezalay has an academic background in both law and political science. She obtained her BA in European and International law at Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, in 2001, through an ERASMUS exchange and a Master in Public law at the Universite Pantheon Assas (Paris II), in Paris, France, in 2002. She was then awarded a Master in Political Science, with a Major in International Organizations at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques of Paris, France, in 2004, and a Research Master in International Relations from the same school in 2005. She is currently a PhD candidate at the Law department of the European University Institute, in Florence, Italy, where she obtained a Research Master in 2006. During her fall semester residency, she will be working on research entitled “The Social Construction of International Norms Through the ‘Naming’ and ‘Shaping’ of ‘Internal’ Armed Conflicts by Competing Non-Governmental International Actors.” Her sponsor is Joseph Weiler.

Emily Hartz
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Denmark

Ms. Emily Hartz is studying for a PhD in Philosophy at the School of Education, University of Aarhus, Denmark. Her project entitled Necessity after 9/11, A Study of Legal Conceptualisations of Necessity related to the Present 'Global War on Terrorism.' Ms. Hartz was a visiting doctoral researcher at the Hauser Global Law School Program during the fall semester 2006. Before this she studied philosophy and mathematics at Trinity College, Dublin; Freie Universtat, Berlin; Universitat der Kunste, Berlin, as well as Copenhagen University. She received her Master's degree in philosophy from Copenhagen University in Denmark in 2003. After graduating she worked for the Centre for Ethics and Law in Copenhagen and the German Reference Centre for Ethics in the Life Sciences in Bonn. In this capacity she has been assigned to a number of EU-sponsored research projects where she has successfully carried out research in the field of ethics and law. She is currently co-coordinator of an interdisciplinary research network in political theory: The Establishment of Power Law and Order. Ms. Hartz is a student at the University of Copenhagen, where she hopes to earn her PhD through the Center of Ethics and Law. She will be working with Richard Pildes and the Center for Law and Security during her stay.

Andrew Higgins
Oxford Exchange Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Australia

Andrew Higgins is a DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford under the supervision of Professor Adrian Zuckerman. His research is focused on the attorney-client privilege and in particular its use and abuse in corporate and governmental contexts. Andrew undertook the BCL at Oxford in 2004-05 where he received a distinction (first class honors) and was then awarded a Rae & Edith Bennett Travelling Scholarship from the University of Melbourne to pursue a doctorate at Oxford.

Previously Andrew worked in Australia as a litigation lawyer in mass tort litigation including tobacco, asbestos and environmental litigation. Andrew played a crucial role in uncovering evidence of British American Tobacco’s ‘document retention’ practices, and its policy of systematically destroying sensitive documents for the purposes of preventing their disclosure in court. These revelations led to criminal investigations in Australia (still ongoing), and criminal and civil law reforms in Victoria and New South Wales regarding document management practices and lawyers’ obligations when advising on them. Andrew also briefed the US Department of Justice on the evidence of BAT’s document destruction, which became a central complaint of the US Federal Government in its RICO Anti-Trust litigation against the tobacco industry in the District Court of Columbia. At the time Andrew was only an articled clerk, and was nominated for the Australian Plaintiff Lawyers Association’s ‘Civil Justice’ Award. He has given occasional guest lectures at the University of Melbourne on Civil Procedure.

Jan Komarek
Oxford Exchange Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Czech Republic

Jan is currently a D.Phil. candidate at the Faculty of Law, University of Oxford, where he also teaches EU law as a graduate teaching assistant. He gave invited lectures at Utrecht University, University of Lund and various institutions in the Czech Republic.

His research focuses on the role of judicial precedent in the context European constitutional pluralism. The question is: “If one of the key elements of constitutional pluralism is its ability to secure deliberation between various constitutional spheres and processes, to what extent can judicial precedent contribute to this deliberation?” At NYU Jan hopes to work on a comparative part of his thesis, dealing with the role of judicial precedent in keeping central court’ authority: the Supreme Court of the U.S. on the one hand, and the European Court of Justice on the other.

Jan holds LLM from University of Stockholm (2004), Diploma of Academy of European Law (EUI, Florence 2004) and Total Law Course Diploma - (CEU, Budapest 2006). In 2004-2006 Jan worked for the Czech Government Agent before the ECJ.

Jan’s articles appeared e.g. in Common Market Law Review, European Law Review or Yearbook of European Law. He is currently assistant editor of Civil Justice Quarterly and member of Advisory Board of European Review of Administrative Law.

Isabelle Ley
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Germany

Isabelle Ley is fellow of the graduate program “Multilevel Constitutionalism: European experiences and Global Perspectives” at the Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany. The working title of her PhD thesis (supervised by Prof. Ulrich K. Preuss) is “On Procedural aspects of the legitimacy of international law making.” She investigates whether international law creation reflects the political quality of the law adequately.

Isabelle Ley studied law, philosophy and political science at the universities of Heidelberg and Hamburg and at Sciences Po, Paris, with a focus on legal philosophy, political theory and international law. She was an intern to the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development and EUROJUST at The Hague. In Beriln, Isabelle Ley worked as teaching and research assistant for Prof. Preuss at the Hertie School of Governance.


Danilo Semeghini
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Italy

Danilo Semeghini is currently a PhD student in Corporate and Commercial Law at University of Brescia, Italy. He graduated cum laude from the University of Milan Law School in April 2005, with a dissertation on venture capitalism and Italian corporate law reform. After an internship in 2005 at the Listing & Legal Affairs Department of Borsa Italiana s.p.a. (Italian stock exchange), he practiced in a law firm in Milan and served as an assistant professor in the Corporate and Commercial Law Department of the University of Milan, Law School until July 2006. In May 2007 he received an LLM degree, Harlan Fiske Stone Honor, from Columbia Law School. He published an article on liability of directors toward creditors and statute of limitation on an Italian law review.

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2006-2007 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Yaron Catane
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Israel

Mr. Yaron Catane is currently a doctoral student at the Hebrew University School of Law in Jerusalem, specializing in labor and employment law. His research focuses on theoretical and practical aspects of resolving employment disputes. He is currently a Visiting Doctoral Researcher at the Hauser Global Law School Program and at the Center for Labor and Employment Law, NYU School of Law.

Mr. Catane obtained his Master of Laws degree (LLM) in Labor Law in 2004, and was a lecturer and assistant in Labor and Employment Law and in Jewish Law at the Hebrew University, Haifa University and Kiryat Ono College.

He has worked in various positions in the legal field: as a lawyer and mediator, clerking for the President of the National Labor Court in Israel, and working as the senior legal assistant in the Regional Labor Court in Jerusalem. He participated in the XVII World Congress of the International Society for Labor Law and Social Security (ISLLSS), Montevideo, Uruguay, in 2003, by fellowship grant from the ISLLSS, and presented on the topic "Remedies for Wrongful Dismissals." Mr. Catane also participated in the Montana Labor Relations Conference in 2004, and presented on the topic "Remedies for Wrongful Discharge: European and Montana Perspectives."

Mr. Catane obtained ordination as a Rabbi by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel, and teaches Jewish Law in various classes. He is married and has five children.

Isabel Feichtner
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Germany

Ms. Isabel Feichtner is writing her dissertation on waivers in the WTO. The dissertation shall be a contribution to the broader discussion on the legalization of international relations and the relationship between law and politics on the international level.

Isabel studied law at Freiburg, the Universiteit van Amsterdam and Humboldt University in Berlin and received an LLM from Cardozo Law School. She is admitted to practice law in Germany and is a member of the New York Bar. After her studies at Cardozo Law School she worked for one year as a corporate associate at the New York law firm Cravath, Swaine and Moore. From 2004-2006 she has been a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg.

At NYU she was Professor Weiler's teaching assistant.

Claes Granmar
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Sweden

Mr. Claes Granmar received his Master of Laws in 1996 from the Stockholm University, Sweden, combined with the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and his Master of EC Law from the Stockholm University, Sweden, where he was a member of the winning team in the Case-Study Competition 1997. In addition, Mr. Granmar received his M.BA in Marketing Management from the Graduate School for Marketing and Communication at Stockholm University in 1999, where he won the prize for best result on the test on decoding patterns of abstract relations between objects.

Mr. Granmar is the author of a Swedish handbook on trademarks and domain names and has recently published the article "Some Reflections upon Branding and Trademarks" in the Nordic legal magazine Nordiskt Immateriellt Rättsskydd (NIR). He is an often-appointed lecturer in trademark law at the Undergraduate Law Program and Master Program in Intellectual Property Law at Stockholm University. Mr. Granmar is a visiting researcher at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy. Before taking up his doctoral research, Mr. Granmar has been working as an in-house lawyer at Morningstar Europe AB, as a trademark and domain name consultant at Domain Network AB and as a deputy lawyer at Stockholm County Administrative Board.

Mr. Granmar's dissertation, "Expanding trademark protection, the market and society," treats the impact a widened scope of trademark protection and trademark centered competition has on the function of markets, on the freedom of expression and on cultures in a U.S. law and EC law context. During the year as a Visiting Doctoral Researcher he reconciles legal aspects and recent findings in sociology in his research interests which include privatization of symbols versus public access to symbols, the spread of global sameness versus cultural diversity, and trademark protection versus freedom of expression.

Emily Hartz
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Denmark

Ms. Emily Hartz is studying for the degree of PhD in Philosophy at The Danish University of Education. Her project entitled "Legal Conceptualizations of Necessity related to the Present 'Global War on Terrorism'" is sponsored by the Danish Research Council. The objective of the project is to develop a theoretical framework for analyzing courtroom articulations of the concept of necessity in relation to the present terrorism conflict.

Ms. Hartz has studied philosophy and mathematics at Trinity College, Dublin; Freie Universtät, Berlin; Universität der Künste, Berlin, as well as Copenhagen University. She received her Master's degree in Philosophy from Copenhagen University in Denmark in 2003.

After graduating she worked for the Centre for Ethics and Law in Copenhagen and the German Reference Centre for Ethics in the Life Sciences in Bonn. In this connection she has been assigned to a number of EU-sponsored research projects where she has successfully carried out research in the field of ethics and law.

Claire O'Brien
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United Kingdom

Niels Petersen
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Germany

Mr. Niels Petersen is PhD candidate at the University of Frankfurt and an associate fellow of the Junior Research Group of the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg. He is currently writing his dissertation on "The Legitimacy of Governments under International Law."

Mr. Petersen received his law degree in 2003 from the University of Muenster after having studied at the Universities of Muenster and Geneva, and the Geneva Graduate Institute for International Studies (HEI).

From 2004 to 2006, he was research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, working on human rights issues, the theory of international law and German constitutional law. Additionally, he gave lectures on fundamental rights at the University of Frankfurt in 2006.

At the same time, he was legal clerk at the Appellate Court of Frankfurt and passed his bar exam in 2005. In the course of this two-year traineeship, he worked, inter alia, for the German Embassy in Bangkok and for the GTZ Legal Advisory Service in Beijing, a project providing advise in legislative affairs to the Chinese National People's Congress.

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2005-2006 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Stephen Humphreys
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Ireland

Mr. Stephen Humphreys is studying for the degree of PhD in Law at the University of Cambridge, England. His research, entitled Legal Intervention: the Parameters of Transnational Law Reform, will attempt to capture the range and scope of donor efforts to promote the rule of law around the world, a field of activity which has come to prominence since 1989.

In 1993, Mr. Humphreys received his BA in English, First Class Honours, from Trinity College, University of Dublin, Ireland. He was awarded the Chevening Scholarship to complete his MA in International and Comparative Law and graduated in 2003, summa cum laude, from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, United Kingdom.

Mr. Humphreys has worked with a number of organizations involved in transnational law reform, particularly in human rights, but also in international environmental law. He has lived in Senegal and Hungary, and speaks French and Hungarian. He travels compulsively, and has been in much of West and East Africa, Central and Eastern Europe and the Middle East. He has experience in journalism, publishing and literary translation, and has taught postcolonial literature and postmodern theory at Eotvos Jozsef Kollegium, ELTE University, Hungary.

Tuula Mouhu-Young
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Finland

Tzvika Nissel
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United States of America & Belgium

Mr. Tzvika Nissel graduated with a degree in English Literature from Yeshiva University, United States, in 1997. Mr. Nissel then read English Law in Jesus College, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1999. Following his work at Cambridge, he began working as a real estate analyst and then covered emerging market banks from 1999 to 2001. Subsequently, he clerked in the Supreme Court of Israel. Mr. Nissel returned to graduate school in 2002 and earned an LLM. in International Legal Studies from NYU School of Law in May 2003.

In 2004, Mr. Nissel was a founding partner of Dudley Lotus, a U.S. law firm with an international law practice. He is currently writing his doctoral dissertation on International Responsibility for the University of Helsinki, Finland.

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2004-2005 Visiting Doctoral Researchers

Natasha Balendra
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Sri Lanka

Natasha Balendra is a Visiting Doctoral Researcher working in both the Hauser Global Law School Program and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice. Natasha's academic work focuses primarily on international human rights law. She is currently reading for a D.Phil. degree at the University of Oxford where she is a Clarendon Scholar. Her research involves an examination of the extent to which a state's international human rights obligations apply to its extra-territorial activities. Natasha holds an LLB from Kings College London, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge and an LLM from Harvard Law School. Natasha has worked as a consultant to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, practiced law both in Sri Lanka and New York and taught at the School of Law at Kings College London.

Gyorgy Lissauer
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
United Kingdom

Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Gyorgy Lissauer was brought up in Budapest and London. He began his undergraduate studies in European Legal Studies at the University of Kent at Canterbury, which included a year at the University of Amsterdam. He then moved to Oxford University to read for the one year B.C.L. before beginning research for an M.Phil. on Establishing United Nations Administered Territories: The Case of Kosovo and East Timor. His doctoral research is an expansion of the M.Phil. Thesis, analyzing the constitutional and international law dimensions of transitional administration of territories by the United Nations.

Dayna Nadine Scott
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Canada

Dayna Nadine Scott received a B.Sc. from the University of Guelph before heading to York University for the joint M.E.S./LLB degree program in 1997. Her Master's thesis entitled "Carbon Sinks Science and the Kyoto Protocol: Controversy as Opportunity for Paradigmatic Policy Shifts" won the York University Thesis Prize for 2001. After completing a judicial clerkship at the Federal Court of Canada and being called to the Bar of Ontario, Dayna returned to Osgoode Hall Law School to pursue her PhD She holds a SSHRC doctoral fellowship and a Fulbright scholarship.

Dayna was recently awarded a Law Commission of Canada prize for her work on Law & Risk ("Shifting the Burden of Proof: The Precautionary Principle and its Potential for the Democratization of Risk" is forthcoming from UBC Press) and is currently working on another Law Commission of Canada and SSHRC funded study entitled "Sharing Knowledges of Risk: Citizen Engagement with Law, Science and Biotechnology."

Dayna's dissertation, Deconstructing the Precautionary Principle, treats the emerging concept of 'precaution' as a powerful legal and rhetorical instrument in the context of environmental and health risk controversies. Her research interests include: environmental law and policy; risk and regulation; environmental justice; law, science and democracy; food safety; environment, trade and globalization.

Benjamin Straumann
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
Switzerland

Benjamin Straumann received his degree from the University of Zurich after studies in history, constitutional law and philosophy in Zurich and as an Erasmus Scholar in Rome. He is spending the year as a Visiting Doctoral Researcher at the Hauser Global Law School Program and the Program in the History and Theory of International Law, completing his dissertation on the classical foundations of Hugo Grotius's De Jure Belli ac Pacis , a project funded by a research fellowship from the University of Zurich (Forschungskredit der Universität Zürich).

For the past two years, Straumann has been a Visiting Scholar at Columbia University, where he has also taught. Previously he served as a teaching assistant at the University of Zurich and worked for the Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the United Nations. His research interests include the history of natural and international law, natural rights and social contract theories, as well as the early modern reception of classical antiquity.

Anne Weber
Visiting Doctoral Researcher
France

Anne Weber graduated in law from the University of Strasbourg, France, in 1999. She completed a Master's degree in the European Protection of Human Rights in 2000, also from the University of Strasbourg.

Currently, she is writing a doctoral dissertation in Human Rights Law at the Robert Schuman Law School of Strasbourg and at Geneva Law School, Switzerland. The subject of her thesis is the non-contentious control mechanisms of Human Rights (reporting procedures, institutions of Commissioner, Rapporteurs), which covers both regional and universal systems, as they are developing and with the view to suggest possible ways of redefining their role and functions.

During the first semester of the academic year 2002-2003, she served as a teaching assistant of the European Master's Program in Human Rights and Democratization, in Venice, Italy. For the past year Anne Weber have been research and teaching assistant at the University of Strasbourg, teaching Constitutional Law and European Comparative Law. She is also working as a volunteer for Amnesty International, representing it to the Council of Europe, and she is a member of the editorial committee of L'Europe des libertés, a law journal.