• Rachel Barkow
    Vice Dean and Segal Family Professor of Regulatory Law and Policy;
    Faculty Director, Center on the Administration of Criminal Law
    Rachel Barkow’s scholarship focuses on applying the lessons and theory of administrative and constitutional law to the administration of criminal justice. She has written more than 20 articles, is a co-author on one of the country’s leading criminal law casebooks, and is recognized as one of the country’s leading experts on criminal law and policy. She received the NYU Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013 and the Law School’s Podell Distinguished Teaching Award in 2007. In June 2013, the Senate confirmed her as a member of the United States Sentencing Commission. She has been a member of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office Conviction Integrity Policy Advisory Panel since 2010. In 2015, she co-founded a clemency resource center that obtained sentencing commutations for 96 people as part of President Obama’s clemency initiative. For her work on clemency with NYU students, she received the NYU Making A Difference Award, given to those who have made a profound and lasting impact for the better on the city, region, nation, or globe. After graduating from Northwestern University (BA ’93), Barkow attended Harvard Law School (’96), where she won the Sears Prize. She served as a law clerk to Judge Laurence H. Silberman of the DC Circuit and Justice Antonin Scalia of the US Supreme Court. Barkow was an associate at Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel in Washington, DC, before joining the NYU Law faculty.
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  • Lily Batchelder
    Frederick I. and Grace Stokes Professor of Law
    Lily Batchelder is professor of law and public policy at NYU School of Law and an affiliated professor at the NYU Wagner School of Public Service. From 2014 to 2015, she was on leave, serving as deputy director of the White House National Economic Council and deputy assistant to the President, and from 2010 to 2014 she served as majority chief tax counsel for the US Senate Committee on Finance. Batchelder’s research and teaching focus on personal income taxes, business tax reform, wealth transfer taxes, retirement savings policy, and social insurance. Before joining NYU in 2005, Batchelder was an associate at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, director of community affairs for a New York state senator, and client advocate for a small social services organization in Ocean Hill-Brownsville, Brooklyn. Batchelder received an AB in Political Science with honors and distinction from Stanford University, an MPP in Microeconomics and Human Services from the Harvard Kennedy School, and a JD from Yale Law School.
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  • Ryan Bubb
    Professor of Law
    Ryan Bubb joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 2010. He was formerly a senior researcher for the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission and a policy analyst at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. He earned a JD from Yale Law School and a PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University. Bubb’s research focuses on regulatory policy, financial institutions, business organizations, and law and economics.
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  • Sarah Burns
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Sarah Burns supervises the Reproductive Justice Clinic, which represents clients throughout the United States in litigation and policy projects centering on reproductive decision making. Burns is executive director of Washington Square Legal Services, the nonprofit entity under which most NYU Clinical Law Programs practice law. Burns also co-founded and oversees the Mediation Clinic and the Litigation, Organizing & Systemic Change Clinic, conducted in partnership with Make the Road NY and Center for Popular Democracy. Burns combines law with learning in social science to develop effective solutions for problems that institutions and communities face. Burns, who has been on the NYU faculty since 1990, specializes in experiential learning pedagogy, developing simulation and clinical courses in litigation, negotiation, mediation, policy advocacy, and systemic change. Burns began her law practice as a litigating attorney with the Washington, DC, commercial law firm Covington & Burling, representing industry associations in federal regulatory matters that Burns cites as “a key introduction to interest-based and advocacy legal practice so central to all negotiation and coalition work—whether in for-profit or not-for-profit/NGO sectors.” Burns later moved into public interest civil rights practice, undertaking litigation, legislative, and policy advocacy work. She has worked nationwide on cases in federal and state courts, and has advised legislative and regulatory initiatives. Burns graduated in 1979 from Yale Law School, where she edited the Yale Law Journal, and holds master’s degrees from Stanford University in sociology and the University of Oklahoma in human relations.
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  • Adam Cox
    Robert A. Kindler Professor of Law
    Adam Cox, Robert A. Kindler Professor of Law at NYU, is a leading expert on immigration law, voting rights, and constitutional law. His writing has appeared in the Yale Law Journal, Stanford Law Journal, Journal of Law and Economics, and many other scholarly publications, and has been covered by the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and others. He is currently writing a book about the President’s power to shape immigration law.
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  • Richard Epstein
    Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law;
    Director, Classical Liberal Institute
    Richard A. Epstein is the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law. He has served as the Peter and Kirstin Bedford Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution since 2000. Epstein is also the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law Emeritus and a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago. He has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1985 and has been a senior fellow of the Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago Division of Biological Sciences since 1983. He was a winner of the Bradley Prize in 2011. Epstein has written numerous articles on a wide range of legal and interdisciplinary subjects, as well as over 15 books; his most recent is The Classical Liberal Constitution: The Uncertain Quest for Limited Government (Harvard U. Press, 2014). He has also edited (with Catherine Sharkey) Cases and Materials on the Law of Torts (11th edition, 2016). He writes a weekly column for Defining Ideas and is a contributor to Ricochet.com and Forbes.com.
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  • Samuel Estreicher
    Dwight D. Opperman Professor of Law;
    Director, Center for Labor and Employment Law;
    Co-Director, Institute of Judicial Administration
    Samuel Estreicher is a nationally preeminent scholar in US and international-comparative labor and employment law and arbitration law. He has authored more than a dozen books, including Beyond Elite Law: Access to Civil Justice in America (with Joy Radice, Cambridge Univ. 2016); leading casebooks on legislation and regulatory state, labor law and employment discrimination and employment law; and published more than 200 articles in professional and academic journals. He served as Chief Reporter for the American Law Institute’s Restatement of Employment Law (2015). After clerking for Judge Harold Leventhal of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit, practicing in a labor law firm, and clerking for Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. of the US Supreme Court, Estreicher joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 1978. In addition to serving as counsel to major law firms, he is the former secretary of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association, a former chair of the Committee on Labor and Employment Law of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York.15). He maintains an active appellate and ADR practice. The Labor and Employment Research Association awarded him its 2010 Susan C. Eaton Award for Outstanding Scholar-Practitioner. In recent years, Estreicher also has published work in public international law and authored several briefs in the Supreme Court and US courts of appeals on employment and US foreign relations law issues. Estreicher received his BA from Columbia College, his MS in industrial relations from Cornell University, and his JD from Columbia Law School, where he was editor-in-chief of the Columbia Law Review. He is a member of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and was appointed in 2016 by the UN Secretary General as a member of the UN’s Internal Justice Commission.
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  • Harry First
    Charles L. Denison Professor of Law;
    Co-Director, Competition, Innovation, and Information Law Program
    Harry First is a specialist in antitrust and business crime. He is the co-author of the casebook Free Enterprise and Economic Organization: Antitrust (7th Ed. 2014) (with John Flynn and Darren Bush), as well as a casebook on regulated industries (with John Flynn). He was twice a Fulbright Research Fellow in Japan and taught antitrust as an adjunct professor at the University of Tokyo. First’s most recent scholarly work has focused on various aspects of antitrust enforcement and theory, including The Microsoft Antitrust Cases: Competition Policy for the Twenty-first Century (with Andrew I. Gavil) (MIT Press, 2014), Exploitative Abuses of Intellectual Property Rights, in The Cambridge Handbook of Antitrust, Intellectual Property, and High Tech (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2017), “Philadelphia National Bank, Globalization, and the Public Interest” (Antitrust Law Journal, 2015), “Your Money and Your Life: The Export of U.S. Antitrust Remedies” in Global Competition Law and Economics (Stanford University Press, 2013), and “Antitrust’s Democracy Deficit” (with Spencer Weber Waller) (Fordham Law Review, 2013). First is also the author of a casebook on business crime and the article “Business Crime and the Public Interest: Lawyers, Legislators, and the Administrative State” (University of California Irvine Law Review, 2012). First is a contributing editor of the Antitrust Law Journal, foreign antitrust editor of the Antitrust Bulletin, a member of the executive committee of the Antitrust Section of the New York State Bar Association, and a member of the advisory board and a senior fellow of the American Antitrust Institute.
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  • Eleanor Fox
    Walter J. Derenberg Professor of Trade Regulation
    Eleanor M. Fox is the Walter J. Derenberg Professor of Trade Regulation at New York University School of Law. She is an expert in antitrust and competition policy, and teaches, writes, and advises on competition policy in nations around the world and in international organizations. She has a special interest in developing countries, poverty, and inequality, and explores how opening markets and attacking privilege, corruption, and cronyism can alleviate marginalization and open paths to economic opportunity and inclusive development. Fox received her law degree from NYU School of Law in 1961; she received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Paris-Dauphine in 2009. She was awarded an inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011 by the Global Competition Review for “substantial, lasting, and transformational impact on competition policy and practice.” She received the inaugural award for outstanding contributions to the competition law community in 2015 by the Academic Society for Competition Law, the world network of academic law and economic competition experts. Fox is writing a book on development, markets, and competition in sub-Saharan Africa.
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  • Scott Hemphill
    Professor of Law
    Scott Hemphill teaches and writes about antitrust, intellectual property, and regulation of industry. His research focuses on the law and economics of competition and innovation, and his scholarship ranges broadly, from drug patents to net neutrality to fashion and intellectual property. Hemphill’s recent work examines the antitrust problem of parallel exclusion in concentrated industries and anticompetitive settlements of patent litigation by drug makers. His scholarship has been cited by the US Supreme Court and the California Supreme Court, among others, and has formed the basis for congressional testimony on matters of regulatory policy. Hemphill's writing has appeared in law reviews, peer-reviewed journals, and the popular press, including the Yale Law Journal, Science, and the Wall Street Journal. He joined NYU from Columbia Law School, where he was a professor of law. Hemphill has also served as antitrust bureau chief for the New York Attorney General and clerked for Judge Richard Posner of the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Justice Antonin Scalia of the Supreme Court. He holds a JD and PhD in economics from Stanford, an AB from Harvard, and an MSc in economics from the London School of Economics, where he studied as a Fulbright Scholar.
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  • Helen Hershkoff
    Herbert M. and Svetlana Wachtell Professor of Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties;
    Co-Director, Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Program
    Helen Hershkoff joined the faculty in 1995 following an acclaimed career as a public interest lawyer at the American Civil Liberties Union and The Legal Aid Society, where she litigated cutting-edge cases involving institutional reform and individual rights. She also worked as a litigation association at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. At NYU, her scholarship and teaching focus on civil procedure and issues of economic justice, and she is a co-director of the Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Program. She is a co-author of the leading casebook on civil procedure, a co-editor of an admired book on comparative civil procedure, and a member of the author team of the “Wright & Miller” treatise focusing on the United States as a party. Hershkoff also writes about state constitutions and the relation between private law and public law, and has been published in Harvard, Stanford, NYU, and other leading law reviews. Hershkoff is a highly respected teacher; she was honored with the NYU 2014–2015 Distinguished Teaching Award, was recognized by the Association of American Law Schools as a 2013 Teacher of the Year, and was a recipient of the Law School’s 2013 Podell Distinguished Teaching Award. Hershkoff earned her BA from Harvard College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in her junior year, holds an MA in modern history from Oxford University, which she attended as a Marshall Scholar, and a JD from Harvard Law School.
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  • Roderick Hills
    William T. Comfort, III Professor of Law
    Roderick Hills teaches and writes in public law areas with a focus on the law governing division of powers between central and subcentral governments. These areas include constitutional law, local government law, land use regulation, jurisdiction and conflicts of law, and education law. His publications have appeared, among other places, in the Harvard Law Review, Pennsylvania Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Stanford Law Review, the University of Chicago Law Review, and the Supreme Court Law Review. Hills has been a cooperating counsel with the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and also files amicus briefs in cases on issues relevant to the autonomy of state and local governments and the protection of their powers from preemption. Hills holds bachelor’s and law degrees from Yale University. He served as a law clerk for Judge Patrick Higginbotham of the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and previously taught at the University of Michigan Law School. He is a member of the state bar of New York and the US Supreme Court bar.
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  • David Kamin
    Professor of Law
    David Kamin ’09 joined NYU School of Law in 2012. His scholarship focuses on tax and budget policy, and he has published on issues ranging from the tax code’s effect on inequality and poverty to the role of budget baselines in the legislative process. Before joining NYU Law, Kamin worked in President Obama’s administration. From 2010-2012, he served as special assistant to the president for economic policy at the White House. There, Kamin helped coordinate administration policy on federal tax and budget issues as well as other areas including unemployment insurance, infrastructure, and the postal service. Prior to serving as special assistant to the president, Kamin worked as special assistant, and later adviser, to the director of the US Office of Management and Budget, helping formulate policy for President Obama’s first two budgets. Kamin earned a BA in economics and political science with highest honors from Swarthmore College in 2002. He earned a JD magna cum laude from NYU Law in 2009.
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  • Sally Katzen
    Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar in Residence
    Sally Katzen served in the Clinton administration as administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), as deputy assistant to the president for economic policy and deputy director of the National Economic Council in the White House, and then as the deputy director for management at OMB. She served as the head of the Agency Review Group for the Obama/Biden transition with responsibility for the Executive Office of the President and all government-wide agencies. She has taught both undergraduates and at various law schools. She is a member of the American Law Institute and the National Academy of Public Administration, has served on multiple panels for the National Academy of Sciences, testified frequently before Congress, and is on the board of several non-profit organizations. Before joining the Clinton administration, Katzen was a partner in the Washington, DC, law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, specializing in regulatory and legislative matters, while serving in leadership roles in the American Bar Association (including chair of the Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice and as DC delegate to the ABA’s House of Delegates), as president of the Federal Communications Bar Association and as president of the Women’s Legal Defense Fund. She graduated from Smith College and the University of Michigan Law School, where she was the first woman editor-in-chief of the Law Review. She clerked for Judge J. Skelly Wright of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and served in the Carter administration as the general counsel of the Council on Wage and Price Stability in the Executive Office of the President.
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  • Sylvia Law
    Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law, Medicine and Psychiatry;
    Co-Director, Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Program
    For more than four decades, Sylvia Law ’68 has been one of the nation’s leading scholars in the fields of health law, gender justice, poverty, and constitutional law. She has played a major role in dozens of civil rights cases before the US Supreme Court and in lower state and federal courts, and she has testified before Congress and state legislatures on a range of issues. In 1983, Law became the first lawyer in the United States selected as a MacArthur Fellow. She is the co-director of the Arthur Garfield Hays Program and chair of the Rose Sheinberg Lecture program at NYU School of Law. She has been active in the Society of American Law Teachers, served as its president from 1988 to 1990, and was honored by the organization with the 2001 Great Teacher Award. In 2004, Law was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
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  • Deborah Malamud
    AnBryce Professor of Law
    Deborah Malamud is a leader among legal academics who study issues of class and public policy, as well as an expert on labor and employment law. Her contributions to the study of class and the law focus on how the law reflects and helps shape our understanding of what it means to be a member of the middle class in the United States. Malamud is also known for her doctrinal and historical scholarship on key issues in labor law and employment discrimination doctrine, including affirmative action. Malamud served as the faculty director of the AnBryce Scholarship Program at NYU School of Law from 2004 to 2011. She viewed her involvement with this unique community of scholars as both an honor and a distinctive opportunity. Malamud was on the faculty of the University of Michigan Law School from 1992 to 2003. Before embarking on her academic career, she was a law clerk to Judge Louis Pollak, US District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, and Justice Harry Blackmun of the US Supreme Court. Malamud received her BA from Wesleyan University and her JD from the University of Chicago Law School.
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  • Arthur Miller
    University Professor
    Arthur Miller, CBE, is one of the nation’s most distinguished legal scholars in the areas of civil litigation, copyright, unfair competition, and privacy. Miller joined NYU School of Law from Harvard Law School, where he not only earned his law degree but also taught for 36 years. A renowned commentator on law and society, he won an Emmy for his work on PBS’s The Constitution: That Delicate Balance and served for two decades as the legal editor for ABC’s Good Morning America. Miller has argued cases in all of the US circuit courts of appeals as well as several before the US Supreme Court. He has worked in the public interest in the areas of privacy, computers, copyright, and the courts. Miller has served as a member and reporter of the Advisory Committee of Civil Rules of the Judicial Conference of the United States by appointment of two chief justices of the United States, as reporter and adviser to the American Law Institute, and as a member of a special advisory group to the chief justice of the US Supreme Court. Miller is the recipient of numerous awards, including five honorary doctorates, three American Bar Association Gavel Awards and a Special Recognition Gavel Award for promoting public understanding of the law. In 2011, he was honored by the Queen Elizabeth II for his charitable and media work by being named a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. Recent honors include the Presidential Medal, University of Oregon, for distinguished public service; the Brandeis Medal, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; and the Robert H. Jackson Award, Pepperdine University School of Law.
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  • Nancy Morawetz
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Nancy Morawetz ’81 joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 1987. Morawetz teaches the Immigrant Rights Clinic, an innovative program that combines litigation and nonlitigation work on behalf of individual immigrants and community-based organizations. Clinic students appear in immigration court, federal district court, and the federal courts of appeals, and they assist in Supreme Court briefs. They also work on community-based advocacy with agencies and legislative bodies at the city, state, and national levels. In addition to her teaching, Morawetz engages in scholarship focused on detention, deportation, and judicial review. Prior to joining the Law School faculty, Morawetz clerked for Judge Patricia M. Wald of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit and served as a staff attorney with the Civil Appeals Unit of the Legal Aid Society of New York for five years. Morawetz is an active participant in pro bono activities concerning immigration law, including serving as the chair of the Supreme Court Immigration Law Working Group and participating in pro bono litigation. She received the 2007 Daniel Levy Memorial Award for Outstanding Achievement in Immigration Law, the 2009 Albert Podell Distinguished Teaching Award, and the 2011 Elmer Fried Excellence in Teaching Award.
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  • Trevor Morrison
    Dean;
    Eric M. and Laurie B. Roth Professor of Law
    Trevor Morrison is dean and also the Eric M. and Laurie B. Roth Professor of Law at NYU School of Law. Before coming to NYU, he was on the faculties of Cornell Law School (2003-08) and Columbia Law School (2008-13). Morrison’s research and teaching interests are in constitutional law, federal courts, and the law of the executive branch. He was previously a law clerk to Judge Betty B. Fletcher of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (1998-99) and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Supreme Court (2002-03). Between the two clerkships, he was a Bristow Fellow in the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of the Solicitor General (1999-2000), an attorney-adviser in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel (2000-01), and an associate at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering (2001-02). Morrison served as associate counsel to President Barack Obama in 2009, and in 2016 President Obama appointed him as chair of the Public Interest Declassification Board. Morrison received a BA with honors in history from the University of British Columbia in 1994 and a JD from Columbia Law School in 1998. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and a member of the American Law Institute and the Council on Foreign Relations.
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  • Erin Murphy
    Professor of Law
    Erin Murphy’s research focuses on technology and forensic evidence in the criminal justice system. She is a nationally recognized expert in forensic DNA typing, and her work has been cited multiple times by the Supreme Court. Her latest book, Inside the Cell: The Dark Side of Forensic DNA, was released in October 2015 (Nation Books). Murphy is co-editor of the Modern Scientific Evidence treatise, and serves as the associate reporter for the American Law Institute's project to revise Article 213 of the Model Penal Code. She has translated her scholarly writing for more popular audiences by publishing in Scientific American, the New York Times, USA Today, Slate, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Huffington Post, and has offered commentary for numerous media outlets, including NPR, CNN, MSNBC, and NBC Nightly News. A proud recipient of the 2012 Podell Distinguished Teaching Award, Murphy teaches criminal law and procedure, evidence, forensic evidence, and professional responsibility in the criminal context, among other courses. She clerked for Judge Merrick B. Garland on the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit.
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  • Richard Pildes
    Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law
    Richard Pildes is one of the nation’s leading scholars of constitutional law and a specialist in legal issues affecting democracy. A former law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall, he has been elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Law Institute, and has also received recognition as a Guggenheim Fellow and a Carnegie Scholar. His acclaimed casebook The Law of Democracy: Legal Structure of the Political Process helped create an entirely new field of study in the law schools. The Law of Democracy systematically explores legal and policy issues concerning the structure of democratic elections and institutions, such as the role of money in politics, the design of election districts, the regulation of political parties, the structure of voting systems, the representation of minority interests in democratic institutions, and similar issues. He has written extensively on the rise of political polarization in the United States, the Voting Rights Act, the dysfunction of America’s political processes, the role of the Supreme Court in overseeing American democracy, and the powers of the American President and Congress, and he has criticized excessively “romantic” understandings of democracy. In addition to his scholarship on these issues, he has written on national-security law, the design of the regulatory state, and American constitutional history and theory. A well-known public intellectual, Pildes also has successfully argued voting-rights cases before the United States Supreme Court and was part of the Emmy-nominated NBC breaking-news team for coverage of the 2000 Bush v. Gore contest.
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  • Samuel Rascoff
    Professor of Law
    Samuel Rascoff is an expert in national security law, and serves as faculty director of the Center on Law and Security. Named a Carnegie Scholar in 2009, Rascoff came to the Law School from the New York City Police Department, where, as director of intelligence analysis, he created and led a team responsible for assessing the terrorist threat to the city. A graduate of Harvard summa cum laude, Oxford with first class honors, and Yale Law School, Rascoff previously served as a law clerk to US Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter and to Judge Pierre N. Leval of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was also a special assistant with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and an associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. Rascoff’s publications include “Presidential Intelligence” (Harvard Law Review); “Counterterrorism and New Deterrence” (NYU Law Review); “Establishing Official Islam? The Law and Strategy of Counter-Radicalization” (Stanford Law Review); “Domesticating Intelligence” (Southern California Law Review), and “The Law of Homegrown (Counter-) Terrorism” (Texas Law Review).
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  • Richard Revesz
    Lawrence King Professor of Law;
    Dean Emeritus;
    Director, Institute for Policy Integrity
    Richard Revesz is one of the nation’s leading voices in the fields of environmental and regulatory law and policy. His work focuses on the use of cost-benefit analysis in administrative regulation, federalism and environmental regulation, design of liability regimes for environmental protection, and positive political economy analysis of environmental regulation. His book Retaking Rationality: How Cost-Benefit Analysis Can Better Protect the Environment and Our Health (with Michael Livermore ’06, 2008) contends that the economic analysis of law can be used to support a more protective approach to environmental and health policy. In 2008, Revesz co-founded the Institute for Policy Integrity at NYU School of Law to advocate for regulatory reform before courts, legislatures, and agencies, and to contribute original scholarly research in the environmental and health-and-safety areas. Revesz received a BS summa cum laude from Princeton University, an MS in civil engineering from MIT, and a JD from Yale Law School, where he was editor-in-chief of the Yale Law Journal. After judicial clerkships with Chief Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice Thurgood Marshall of the US Supreme Court, Revesz joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 1985 and served as dean from 2002 to 2013. Revesz is the director of the American Law Institute, the leading independent organization in the United States producing scholarly work to clarify, modernize, and otherwise improve the law. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a senior fellow of the Administrative Conference of the United States.
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  • Adam Samaha
    Inez Milholland Professor of Civil Liberties
    Adam Samaha’s work focuses on constitutional law and the role of courts in society. Cutting across several fields of law, much of his scholarship explores social decisions under conditions of uncertainty, disagreement, and limited resources. His major articles explore topics such as appearances, asking and telling, tiebreaking, exit and sorting across regulatory boundaries, excessive process, valuation of people’s time, and the concept of legal change. He also has written a series of papers on constitutional and statutory interpretation, and he is known for his scholarship on government transparency and the social model of disability. Before joining NYU Law in 2012, Samaha was a tenured professor at University of Chicago Law School, where he received the teaching award in 2007. He continues to experiment with electronic texts, Skype in the classroom, and virtual workshops. Before teaching, Samaha clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens and was a member of the tobacco litigation team at Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi. Samaha graduated from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review and received the Fay Diploma.
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  • Catherine Sharkey
    Crystal Eastman Professor of Law
    Catherine Sharkey is the Crystal Eastman Professor of Law at NYU School of Law. She is one of the nation’s leading authorities on the economic loss rule, punitive damages, and federal preemption. She has published more than fifty articles, essays, and book chapters in the fields of torts, products liability, administrative law, remedies, and class actions. Sharkey is co-author with Richard Epstein of Cases and Materials on Torts (11th edition, 2016) and co-editor with Saul Levmore of Foundations of Tort Law (2nd edition, 2009). She is a founding member of the World Tort Law Society, established in 2012, and an elected member of the American Law Institute. Sharkey is an appointed public member of the Administrative Conference of the United States and an adviser to the ALI Restatement Third, Torts: Liability for Economic Harm. She was a 2011-12 Guggenheim Fellow. Sharkey received her BA in economics summa cum laude from Yale University. A Rhodes Scholar, she received an MSc in economics for development, with distinction, from Oxford University, and her JD from Yale Law School, where she was Executive Editor of the Yale Law Journal. After clerking for Judge Guido Calabresi of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice David H. Souter of the US Supreme Court, Sharkey practiced appellate litigation before joining the faculty of Columbia Law School. She joined NYU School of Law in 2007.
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  • Daniel Shaviro
    Wayne Perry Professor of Taxation
    After graduating from Princeton University and Yale Law School, Daniel Shaviro spent three years each at Caplin & Drysdale, a leading tax specialty firm, and the Joint Committee on Taxation, where he worked extensively on the Tax Reform Act of 1986. Shaviro began his teaching career at the University of Chicago Law School in 1987 and joined the NYU School of Law in 1995. His scholarly work examines tax policy, budget policy, and entitlements issues. His list of published books includes Fixing U.S. International Taxation (2014); Decoding the U.S. Corporate Tax (2009); Taxes, Spending, and the U.S. Government’s March Toward Bankruptcy (2007); Who Should Pay for Medicare? (2004); Making Sense of Social Security Reform (2000); When Rules Change: An Economic and Political Analysis of Transition Relief and Retroactivity (2000); and Do Deficits Matter? (1997). Shaviro also has published a novel, Getting It (2010), and has a blog at danshaviro.blogspot.com. At NYU Law, Shaviro teaches various tax courses, including a scholarly colloquium on tax policy and public finance.
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  • Christopher Sprigman
    Professor of Law
    Christopher Sprigman came to NYU School of Law in 2013 from the University of Virginia School of Law. Sprigman teaches intellectual property law, antitrust law, competition policy, and comparative constitutional law. His research focuses on how legal rules affect innovation and the deployment of new technologies. Sprigman’s widely cited works have had an influence on important aspects of copyright law, and often belie the conventional wisdom about intellectual property rights. He was an appellate counsel from 1999 to 2001 in the Antitrust Division of the US Department of Justice, where US v. Microsoft was among his cases, and later was elected partner in the Washington, DC, office of King & Spalding before becoming a residential fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Sprigman received his BA in history magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1988, and a JD with honors from the University of Chicago Law School in 1993. He subsequently clerked for Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and Justice Lourens H. W. Ackermann of the Constitutional Court of South Africa. Sprigman also taught at the University of the Witwatersrand’s law school in Johannesburg.
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  • Richard Stewart
    University Professor;
    John Edward Sexton Professor of Law;
    Director, Frank J. Guarini Center on Environmental, Energy, and Land Use Law

    Richard Stewart is recognized as one of the world’s leading scholars in environmental and administrative law. His current research projects include “megaregional” international agreements on regulation, trade, and investment; using law to reform and secure justice in global governance; private and hybrid global regulation; innovative institutional strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and solving the challenge of nuclear waste. Stewart also works on global climate law initiatives and environmental law reform projects in developing countries through the International Environmental Law Clinic and the Guarini Center on Environmental, Energy, and Land Use Law. Students are closely involved in these projects. He is launching a new course on Food Law and Policy.

    Before joining the faculty, Stewart served as Byrne Professor of Administrative Law at Harvard Law School and as a member of the faculty of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. He has served as assistant attorney general in charge of the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the US Department of Justice and chairman of the Environmental Defense Fund. Stewart directs, with NYU School of Law Professor Benedict Kingsbury, a major project on global administrative law that examines and advances mechanisms of transparency, participation, reason giving, and review to meet accountability gaps in global regulatory institutions. He recently published a major book on US nuclear waste law regulation and policy. Stewart serves as Advisory Trustee of the Environmental Defense Fund.

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