Three students talking on Greenwich Village street corner

At NYU Law, students are encouraged to take advantage of all the Law School has to offer, from working directly with faculty on their research, to getting involved with our centers, to participating in clinics and student organizations. Here are some opportunities for those specifically interested in cities and land use:

The Frank J. Guarini Center Summer Internships in Public Interest Environmental and Land Use Law provide students with public interest environmental law experience through grants for summer internships, mentoring by the Law School’s environmental law faculty, and exposure to leading practitioners in the field.

The Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy hires enrolled NYU graduate students to work as research assistants (RAs) on a rolling basis throughout the year. Graduate students engage in all aspects of the center’s work, including all-team brainstorming sessions, research, and public events. Daily tasks may include background research and literature review, policy analysis, communications assistance, data analysis, web development, and event planning. In general, graduate researchers tend to specialize in one of two areas: policy/communications, and data/GIS. The center also offers fellowships to current RAs and research fellows.

 The Office of Career Services and the Public Interest Law Center will also help you plan your next steps and explore summer funding options.

Postgraduate Options

Postgraduate Fellowships for Academic Careers, sponsored by the Guarini Center, help promising young scholars, including qualified NYU Law alumni, embark on academic and public service careers.

Postgraduate Research Fellowships, sponsored by the Guarini Center, support law graduates to undertake research and other activities in support of current center projects.

The Traditional LLM is designed for students who wish to take full advantage of NYU’s extraordinarily wide range of course offerings and the diverse research interests of our faculty. Unlike students in the specialized LLM programs, candidates pursuing the traditional LLM degree are not limited to a specific number of classes in one field, and they have the freedom to choose courses that match their interests.