IILJ and CHRGJ host International Law and Human Rights Scholarship Conference

This year's International Law and Human Rights Scholarship Conference took place from February 29 through March 2. Cohosted by the Institute for International Law and Justice (IILJ) and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ), each year this conference gives current JD, LL.M., and J.S.D. students the opportunity to present their original research on key issues of international law. 

After their presentations, the students received feedback from expert commentators, including Professors Philip Alston, Gráinne de Búrca, Kevin Davis, Robert Howse, and Richard Stewart.

Full list of student presenters and topics:

Julian Arato (LL.M. ’12), “Treaty Interpretation and Constitutional Transformation: ‘Subsequent Practice’ as a Mode of Informal Change in International Organizations”

Hannah Bloch-Webha ’13, “Global Governance in the Information Age: The Terrorist Finance Tracking Program”

Valerie Brender ’12, “A Private War: the Forced Labor of Migrant Workers Employed by Private U.S. Military Logistics Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan”

Jonathan Cardenas ’13, “Deal-Jumping in Cross-Border Merger & Acquisition Negotiations: A Comparative Analysis of Pre-Contractual Liability Under French, German, United Kingdom and United States Law”

Roberto Chenal (LL.M. ’12), “Justiciability of the Rights to Food and Water and the Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights”

Matt Craig ’13, “Responding with Appropriate Procedures to Concerns Raised by U.S. Targeted Killing Practices”

Thomas Earnest ’12, “(Re)Developing Targeted Killings as a Neutral Principle?”

Jessye Freeman (LL.M. ’12), “Using Australian Tort Law to Respond to Resident Human Rights Violators”

Adria Gulizia ’13, “Substance, Form and Power in the Financial Action Task Force: A GAL Case Study”

Elizabeth Hassan (LL.M. ’12), “Accountability Deficit of Specialized International Agencies and the Challenges Posed to Global Administrative Law”

Ben Heath (LL.M. ’12), “Humanitarian Coordination as Administrative Power: The Intertwined Histories of the United Nations and the International Organization for Migration”

Karen Leovy (J.S.D.), “The Inter-Jurisdictional Containment of Natural Disasters - The Case of Managing Cyclone Nargis (Myanmar, 2008)”

Sam Litton ’12, “US-Tuna and the Hardening of International Soft Law”

Elena Lobo ’13, “Meeting at the Margins - The Margin of Appreciation in the European Court of Human Rights: A Dialogue Between International and National, Privacy and the Paparazzi”

Salona Lutchman (LL.M. ’12), “Should South African law allow a child to sue its drug-addicted mother for harm inflicted in utero? An analysis of South Africa’s obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989”

Catarina Prata (LL.M. ’12), “Connecting the Dots: Law on State Responsibility and Private Military and Securities Companies – Questions of Attribution”

Nikki Reisch ’12, “Resolving the Rights- Responsibility Imbalance in International Investment Law: Is ‘Arbitrating Human Rights’ the Answer?”

Christopher Roberts ’12, “Individual Rights and the Illegality of Amnesties Under International Law”

Carey Shenkman ’13, “Catalyzing National Judicial Capacity - The ICC’s First Crimes Against Humanity Outside Armed Conflict”

Guy Sinclair (J.S.D.), “To Reform the World: Law, Legitimacy, and the Expanding Powers of International Organizations”

G. Alex Sinha ’13, “Mitigating the Twofold Tragedy of Child Soldiers: Uncovering Super-Privileged Combatants in the Geneva Conventions”

Carson Thomas ’13, “Advancing the Legal Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict: Interpreting Protocol I’s Threshold of Impermissible Environmental Damage”

Amos Toh (LL.M. ’12), “Revisiting the Universality of Human Rights”

Kaveri Vaid ’12, “Sovereignty Enforced is not Sovereignty Undermined: The ICC’s Same-Case Complementarity Requirement”

Aneesa Walji (LL.M. ’12), “Vicitms or Terrorists? Child Soldiers in Canadian Refugee Law”

Elspeth Faiman ’13, “The Montreal Protocol in US Domestic Law: A ‘Bottom Up’ Approach to the Development of Global Administrative Law”

Posted March 9, 2012

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