Admitted Students Day gives future 1Ls full range of NYU Law experience

This year Admitted Students Day has so many offerings for successful NYU Law J.D. applicants that the name itself has become a misnomer: Admitted Students Day events, organized by the Office of Admissions, now each actually span two days (March 5-6, March 26-27, and April 16-17), giving future 1Ls maximum opportunity to learn more about the Law School and interact with its community.

Thursday's program includes a chance to visit the classes of professors such as criminal law expert James B. Jacobs and constitutional law scholar David Richards, attend a fair featuring representatives of dozens of student journals and organizations, get a peek at the Law School residence halls, and listen to a panel of recent NYU Law graduates talk about their experiences.

Today's program kicks off with a welcome breakfast with faculty and current students, followed by an introduction to NYU Law by Dean Richard Revesz touching on the Law School’s unique strengths, including its global perspective, strong support of public service work, pioneering lawyering and clinical programs, and diverse colloquia. The rest of the day is filled with discussions of current legal issues, career opportunities, and prominent Law School academic programs, with faculty participants including Philip Alston, Randy Hertz, and Margaret Satterthwaite '99; an informal lunch with professors; further chances to visit classes with professors like Vicki Been '83 and Joseph Weiler; and talks with a host of accomplished alumni and administrators.

Prospective 1Ls for the 2009-10 academic year are taking full advantage of the invitation to see what makes NYU Law tick. Kenneth Kleinrock, assistant dean of admissions, said, “We’re delighted that attendance at this year’s Admitted Students Day events is among the highest we’ve seen in the last decade.”

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