Center on the Administration of Criminal Law

About the Center:

The center's mission is to promote and defend good government practices in criminal matters. The center analyzes important issues of criminal law, particularly focusing on prosecutorial power and discretion. It pursues this mission in three main arenas: academia, the courts, and public policy debates. Through the center's academic component, the center researches criminal justice practices at all levels of government, produces scholarship on criminal justice issues, and hosts symposia and conferences to address significant topics in criminal law and procedure. The litigation component uses the center’s research and experience with criminal justice practices to inform courts in important criminal justice matters, particularly in cases in which exercises of prosecutorial discretion create significant legal issues. The public policy component applies the center’s criminal justice expertise to improve practices in the criminal justice system and enhance the public dialogue on criminal justice matters. The center is the first and only organization dedicated to defining good government practices in criminal prosecutions. No other organization is dedicated to improving prosecution practices through research, litigation, and the improvement of public policy.

What's Upcoming:


 

Please Join Us for
NYU’s Center on the Administration of Criminal Law’s 8th Annual Conference,

Reckoning With Force: Examining the Intersecting Roles of Prosecutors, Police, and Community in Use-of-Force Cases

7 CLE Professional Practice Credits

Date: Friday, April 8, 2016
Time: 9am-4:45 p.m. (CLE Registration begins at 8:45a.m.)
Location: Greenberg Lounge, Vanderbilt Hall, NYU School of Law, 40 Washington Square South, NY, NY

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES by

Roy Austin, Jr., Deputy Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Office of Urban Affairs, Justice and Opportunity

Vanita Gupta, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and head of the Civil Rights Division, United States Department of Justice

FIRST PANEL: THE FRONT LINE BEHIND THE FRONT LINE: EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE PROSECUTOR IN USE-OF-FORCE CASES INVOLVING UNARMED CIVILIANS.

Moderator: Prof. Erin Murphy, Professor of Law, New York University School of Law. Panelists: Robert J. Moossy, Jr., John Chisholm, Milwaukee District Attorney; Alvin L. Bragg, Jr., Chief of the Special Investigations and Prosecutions Unit, New York Attorney General’s Office; Cynthia Conti-Cook, staff attorney, New York Legal Aid Society and head of the Cop Accountability Project; Kevin T. Kane, Chief State's Attorney for Connecticut

SECOND PANEL: WHO SHOULD POLICE THE POLICE: SELF-POLICING POST-FERGUSON

Moderator: Prof. Barry Friedman, Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law and Founding Director of the Policing Project, New York University School of Law.  Panelists: Christy Lopez, Deputy Chief, Special Litigation Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice; J. Scott Thompson, Chief of Police, Camden, NJ; Jane Castor, Former Chief of Police, Tampa FL; Prof. Katherine A. Levine, New York University School of Law

THIRD PANEL: COPS, PROSECUTORS AND COMMUNITY: IDENTIFYING SHARED SPACE IN USE-OF-FORCE CASES 

Moderator: Anne Milgram, former New Jersey Attorney General and Senior Fellow at the Center on the Administration of Criminal Law, New York University School of Law.   Panelists: Baher Azmy, Legal Director, Center on Constitutional Rights and Professor at Seton Hall University School of Law; Melba Pearson, President of the National Black Prosecutor’s Association and Asst. Chief of the Career Criminal/Robbery Unit, Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office; Acting Attorney General Robert Lougy, New Jersey Office of the Attorney General; Prof. Jocelyn Simonson, Brooklyn Law School; Nancy Hoppock, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Risk Management Bureau, New York Police Department

TO REGISTER FOR THIS CONFERENCE PLEASE CLICK HERE

CLE CREDIT WILL BE APPROPRIATE FOR BOTH EXPERIENCED AND NEWLY ADMITTED ATTORNEYS.

 

What's New:

In December 2015 the Center filed another amicus brief with the Supreme Court, in the case of Pena Rodriguez v. State of Colorado.  Our appearance as amicus curiae in this case was prompted by our belief that the Sixth Amendment right to trial by an impartial jury requires that an exception be made to the “no impeachment of a jury verdict” rule for cases in which defendants offer evidence of racial bias during jury deliberations.  We believe that protecting defendants’ Sixth Amendment rights is crucial for the fair and effective administration of criminal justice.  A copy of our brief can be found here.

On July 27, 2015, the center filed an amicus brief petitioning the United States Supreme Court to grant certiorari to reject the Third Circuit's recognition of a "due diligence" rule—a rule that excuses the Government’s failure to disclose favorable evidence under Brady when the defendant could have obtained the evidence on his own by exercising due diligence. Such recognition of a "due diligence" exception to Brady undermines defendants' rights to due process, blurs an otherwise clear ethical obligation on the part of prosecutors to disclose exculpatory information, and serves to erode public confidence in our system of criminal justice. 

The Center also filed a second amicus brief the same week, on another critically important topic. In this brief, we argue that the United States Supreme Court has jurisdiction to review the Louisiana Supreme Court's refusal to give Miller v. Alabama, the seminal case which held that life without parole for juveniles was unconstitutional, retroactive effect. Our appearance as amicus curiae in this case is prompted by our belief that the Court has jurisdiction, pursuant to its Article III powers, to remedy the violation of an individual's Constitutional right against the imposition of cruel and unusual punishment.