Dissertation Title: The Emergence of an Amero-African Approach to Human Rights

Doctoral Supervisor: Professor Philip Alston

Research Interests and Biographical Information:

Christopher’s academic research as a whole is focused on the history and theory of human rights. Christopher’s doctoral work focuses on the comparative historical evolution of the African, Inter-American and European regional human rights systems, and on the emergence within the Inter-American and African systems of a vision and practice of human rights that contrasts with the approach employed within the European system. Christopher’s research also focuses on the history, prospects and limitations of international criminal law, and alternatives thereto, as well as on the legacies of the colonial period in terms of contemporary repressive practices, and on the importance of the colonial period relative to the history of human rights more broadly.
 
In addition to his academic work, Christopher has extensive experience as a human rights practitioner, having worked with and for organizations and institutions such as the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, UNHCR, UNICEF, the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies, the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, the International Federation for Human Rights, Avocats Sans Frontiers, the Arab Center for the Promotion of Human Rights, DIGNITY – The Danish Institute Against Torture, the International Refugee Assistance Project, Transparency Maldives, Tunisian Lawyers Against Torture and the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.
 
Christopher holds a BA in International Relations from Brown University, an MA in Critical Theory from the School of Oriental and African Studies, and a JD from NYU School of Law.