NYU/Princeton Conference on Mobile and Location Privacy: A Technology and Policy Dialog

Date: Friday, April 13, 2012
Time: 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Location: New York University School of Law, Lipton Hall, 108 West 3rd Street (between Sullivan and MacDougal Streets), New York City

Co-sponsored by the New York University Information Law Institute and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy, with generous support from Microsoft.

This event has occurred. Videos of the keynote address and technology demonstration are at the following links:

Conference description: The age of ubiquitous computing is here. People routinely carry smartphones and other devices capable of recording and transmitting immense quantities of personal information and tracking their every move. Privacy has suffered in this new environment, with new reports every week of vulnerabilities and unintended disclosures of private information. On Friday, April 13, 2012, New York University’s Information Law Institute and Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy will host a technology and policy dialogue about the new world of mobile and location privacy. The gathering aims to bring together the policy and technology communities to discuss the substantial privacy issues arising from the growth of mobile and location technologies. The conference will combine a variety of formats, including roundtable discussions on specific topics, a keynote address, and a technology demonstration.

Speakers

  • Edward Felten (Federal Trade Commission, Princeton University, Center for Information Technology Policy) will deliver a keynote address to spark the cross-disciplinary dialog, and
  • Ashkan Soltanti (Independent Researcher) will demonstrate key technological elements of mobile and location privacy.

Roundtable Discussions

Each roundtable discussion will begin with 5-minute comments on key issues from 5-7 invited discussants. A moderator will then guide roundtable discussion among all attendees. We anticipate a lively and balanced cross-disciplinary conversation among participants from academia, industry, government, and advocacy groups.

Roundtable 1: Models of Self-Regulating and Regulating Privacy

Description: Technology companies in several fields have adopted self-regulatory codes or guidelines to rein in business practices that affect customers’ privacy and avoid more formal and inflexible forms of government regulation. This roundtable will ask if these efforts have worked and whether there is a need for formal privacy regulation in the mobile industry.

Moderator:

  • Ira Rubinstein (New York University School of Law, Information Law Institute)

Discussants:

  • Michael Altschul (CTIA, The Wireless Association)
  • Justin Brookman (Center for Democracy and Technology)
  • Aaron Burstein (National Telecommunications and Information Administration)
  • Joel Reidenberg (Fordham University School of Law)
  • Sid Stamm (Mozilla)

Roundtable 2: Phones, Drones & Social Networks: New Technologies and the Fourth Amendment after Jones

Description: In United States v. Jones, the Supreme Court upended decades of Fourth Amendment law and held that installing a GPS device and monitoring a car’s location in public could violate the Constitution. Two concurring opinions also indicated a willingness to reconsider how the Fourth Amendment applies to new technologies. This roundtable will discuss some of these new technologies and how we should think about implications for Fourth Amendment doctrine.

Moderator:

  • Stephen Schulhofer (New York University School of Law)

Discussants:

  • Catherine Crump (American Civil Liberties Union)
  • Barry Friedman (New York University School of Law)
  • Julian Sanchez (CATO Institute)
  • Christopher Slobogin (Vanderbilt Law School)
  • Michael Sussmann (Perkins Coie)

Roundtable 3: Privacy and the Many Layers of Mobile Platforms

Description: Mobile platforms give many players access to personal information, including OS makers, handset makers, app makers, and service providers. These different layers of stakeholders all have legitimate reasons for accessing personal information, but also have the potential to abuse this access. This roundtable will ask how consumers, the government, and industry should enable innovative new services at different layers of the platform stack while still protecting user privacy.

Moderator:

  • Joseph Lorenzo Hall (New York University, Media, Culture, and Communication and Information Law Institute)

Discussants:

  • Aaron Brauer-Rieke (Center for Democracy and Technology)
  • Paul Nolting (Verizon Wireless)
  • Kenneth Priore (Grindr)
  • Felix Wu (Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law)

Event Schedule

  • 9:30 am – 10:00 am: Registration and Breakfast
  • 10:00 am – 10:15 am: Opening Remarks
  • 10:15 am – 11:00 am: Keynote Address: Ed Felten
  • 11:00 am – 11:15 am: Coffee Break
  • 11:15 am – 12:30 pm: Roundtable: Models of Self-Regulating and Regulating Privacy
  • 12:30 pm – 1:15 pm: Lunch
  • 1:15 pm –2:00 pm: Technology Demonstration: Ashkan Soltani
  • 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm: Roundtable: Phones, Drones & Social Networks—New Technologies and the Fourth Amendment after Jones
  • 3:15 pm – 3:30 pm: Coffee Break
  • 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm: Roundtable: Privacy and the Many Layers of Mobile Platforms
  • 4:45 pm – 5:00 pm: Concluding Remarks

Event Organizers

Organizing committee:

  • Roger Ford (New York University School of Law, Information Law Institute)
  • Joseph Lorenzo Hall (New York University, Media, Culture, and Communication and Information Law Institute)
  • Helen Nissenbaum (New York University, Media, Culture, and Communication and Information Law Institute)
  • Ira Rubinstein (New York University School of Law, Information Law Institute)
  • Stephen J. Schultze (Princeton University, Center for Information Technology Policy)
  • Andrew Selbst (New York University, Media, Culture, and Communication and Information Law Institute)
  • Katherine Strandburg (New York University School of Law)

Administrators:

  • Nicole Arzt (New York University School of Law)
  • Laura Cummings-Abdo (Princeton University, Center for Information Technology Policy)

Attendees may also wish to consider participating in the Wall Street Journal’s Data Transparency Weekend, which begins right after this event concludes. The Data Transparency Weekend will start on Friday night at New York University School of Law, 40 Washington Square South, Vanderbilt Hall, Greenberg Lounge.

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