Areas of Study

Clinics

Faculty

  • Claudia Angelos
    Clinical Professor of Law
    Claudia Angelos, an authority on prisoners’ rights, teaches lawyering and litigation and directs the Civil Rights Clinic, the Racial Justice Clinic, and the New York Civil Liberties Clinic at NYU Law. Over more than twenty years at the Law School, she and her students have litigated more than 100 civil rights cases in the New York federal courts. She frequently speaks on a range of issues, including legal education, prisoners’ rights, civil rights, ethics, and pretrial and trial practice. She is an honors graduate of Radcliffe College and Harvard Law School and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. A long-time past president of the New York Civil Liberties Union, Angelos now serves as its general counsel and sits on the board and the executive committee of the American Civil Liberties Union. She is also a member of the board and executive committee of the Clinical Legal Education Association and the boards of the Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York and the Society of American Law Teachers.
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  • Sarah Burns
    Professor of Clinical Law;
    Faculty Director, Carr Center for Reproductive Justice
    Sarah Burns is faculty director of the Carr Center for Reproductive Justice and supervises the Reproductive Justice Clinic, which represents clients throughout the United States in litigation and policy projects centering on reproductive decision making. Burns is executive director of Washington Square Legal Services, the nonprofit entity under which most NYU Clinical Law Programs practice law. Burns also co-founded and oversees the Mediation Clinic and the Litigation, Organizing & Systemic Change Clinic, conducted in partnership with Make the Road NY and Center for Popular Democracy. Burns combines law with learning in social science to develop effective solutions for problems that institutions and communities face. Burns, who has been on the NYU faculty since 1990, specializes in experiential learning pedagogy, developing simulation and clinical courses in litigation, negotiation, mediation, policy advocacy, and systemic change. Burns began her law practice as a litigating attorney with the Washington, DC, commercial law firm Covington & Burling, representing industry associations in federal regulatory matters that Burns cites as “a key introduction to interest-based and advocacy legal practice so central to all negotiation and coalition work—whether in for-profit or not-for-profit/NGO sectors.” Burns later moved into public interest civil rights practice, undertaking litigation, legislative, and policy advocacy work. She has worked nationwide on cases in federal and state courts, and has advised legislative and regulatory initiatives. Burns graduated in 1979 from Yale Law School, where she edited the Yale Law Journal, and holds master’s degrees from Stanford University in sociology and the University of Oklahoma in human relations.
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  • Alina Das
    Associate Professor of Clinical Law
    Alina Das ’05 joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 2011. Das co-directs the Immigrant Rights Clinic, a leading institution in local and national struggles for immigrant rights. She and her students represent immigrants and community organizations in litigation and advocacy at the agency, federal court, and Supreme Court levels. In addition to her teaching, Das engages in scholarship on deportation and detention issues, particularly at the intersection of immigration and criminal law. Das also serves as faculty director of the NYU Bickel & Brewer Latino Institute for Human Rights. Prior to joining the Law School, Das was a Soros Justice Fellow and staff attorney with the Immigrant Defense Project, and clerked for Judge Kermit V. Lipez of the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. Das graduated magna cum laude with an AB in government from Harvard University, and graduated cum laude from NYU Law as a Root-Tilden-Kern Scholar with a joint MPA from NYU’s Wagner School of Public Service. Das is a recipient of the LexisNexis Matthew Bender Daniel Levy Memorial Award for Outstanding Achievement in Immigration Law, the NYU Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award, and the NYU Center for Multicultural Education & Programs Nia Faculty Award.
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  • Paula Galowitz
    Clinical Professor of Law
    For more than three decades, Paula Galowitz has concentrated her teaching, scholarship, and bar association work on improving legal services for the indigent. Today she is widely known both as a clinical teacher and as an expert on civil legal services for indigent clients. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Galowitz clerked for Judge Jacob D. Fuchsberg of the New York State Court of Appeals before joining the civil division of the New York Legal Aid Society. In 1980, she came to NYU School of Law. Galowitz teaches in the Community Development and Economic Justice Clinic, in which students provide legal services to grassroots community groups; in their fieldwork, the students represent clients in transactional matters and litigation cases. Galowitz has also taught in the Medical-Legal Advocacy Clinic, which employs a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to providing on-site legal advocacy assistance and training to medical providers. Some of her scholarship has been about interdisciplinary clinical teaching and ethical issues in medical-legal partnerships. Galowitz also teaches a simulation course on civil litigation and has taught a seminar called Professional Responsibility in the Public Interest. She is currently on the board of trustees of the Interest on Lawyer Account Fund of the State of New York and on the board of directors of the Center for the Study of Applied Legal Education.
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  • Martin Guggenheim
    Fiorello LaGuardia Professor of Clinical Law
    One of the nation’s foremost experts on children’s rights and family law, Martin Guggenheim ’71 has taught at NYU School of Law, where he now co-directs the Family Defense Clinic, since 1973. From 1998 to 2002, he was director of Clinical and Advocacy Programs. Guggenheim has been an active litigator in the area of children and the law and has argued leading cases on juvenile delinquency and termination of parental rights in the US Supreme Court. He is also a well-known scholar, having published more than 50 articles and book chapters, plus five books, including What’s Wrong with Children’s Rights (2005). His research has focused on adolescent abortion, First Amendment rights in schools, the role of counsel for children in court proceedings, and empirical research on child welfare practice, juvenile justice, and family law. As a student at NYU Law, he was an Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Scholar. After law school, Guggenheim worked at the Juvenile Rights Division of New York’s Legal Aid Society and later for the Juvenile Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation.
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  • Randy Hertz
    Vice Dean;
    Professor of Clinical Law;
    Director, Clinical and Advocacy Programs
    Randy Hertz came to NYU School of Law in 1985 as one of the first to join the new clinical tenure track. A graduate of Stanford Law School, where he was the articles and symposium editor of the Law Review, he clerked for Robert F. Utter, chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court, and later worked at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, where he handled criminal trials and appeals. Hertz is an editor-in-chief of NYU Law’s Clinical Law Review, the first scholarly journal to focus on clinical legal education and one of the few peer-edited law reviews in the country. Hertz regularly works pro bono on briefs in criminal appeals, including capital appeals and habeas corpus proceedings. He is the co-author of a two-volume book on habeas corpus that is regularly used by practicing lawyers and routinely cited by judges. And, together with University Professor Anthony Amsterdam and Law School Professor Martin Guggenheim, he wrote a trial manual on juvenile court practice that is the leading work for lawyers who handle juvenile delinquency cases. Hertz teaches the Juvenile Defender Clinic and Criminal Litigation.
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  • Holly Maguigan
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Holly Maguigan teaches a criminal defense clinic and another on comparative criminal justice, as well as a seminar on global public-service lawyering and a course on evidence. She is an expert on the criminal trials of battered women. Her research and teaching are interdisciplinary. Of particular importance in her litigation and scholarship are the obstacles to fair trials experienced by people accused of crimes who are not part of the dominant culture. Maguigan is a member of the Family Violence Prevention Fund’s National Advisory Committee on Cultural Considerations in Domestic Violence Cases. She serves on the boards of directors of the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women, MADRE, and the William Moses Kunstler Fund for Racial Justice. Maguigan is a past co-president of the Society of American Law Teachers. SALT named her Great Teacher of 2014.
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  • Nancy Morawetz
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Nancy Morawetz ’81 joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 1987. Morawetz teaches the Immigrant Rights Clinic, an innovative program that combines litigation and nonlitigation work on behalf of individual immigrants and community-based organizations. Clinic students appear in immigration court, federal district court, and the federal courts of appeals, and they assist in Supreme Court briefs. They also work on community-based advocacy with agencies and legislative bodies at the city, state, and national levels. In addition to her teaching, Morawetz engages in scholarship focused on detention, deportation, and judicial review. Prior to joining the Law School faculty, Morawetz clerked for Judge Patricia M. Wald of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit and served as a staff attorney with the Civil Appeals Unit of the Legal Aid Society of New York for five years. Morawetz is an active participant in pro bono activities concerning immigration law, including serving as the chair of the Supreme Court Immigration Law Working Group and participating in pro bono litigation. She received the 2007 Daniel Levy Memorial Award for Outstanding Achievement in Immigration Law, the 2009 Albert Podell Distinguished Teaching Award, and the 2011 Elmer Fried Excellence in Teaching Award.
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  • Laura Sager
    Clinical Professor of Law
    Laura Sager focuses on employment and housing discrimination law and on training law students in litigation skills. As a clinical professor at NYU School of Law, she has been lead counsel, assisted by clinic students, in significant class actions challenging discrimination in the workplace, including a landmark case that invalidated New York City’s entry-level test for firefighters and enabled women to serve as firefighters for the first time in the city’s history. In recent years, students in her clinic have honed their litigation skills in cases challenging discrimination in housing opportunities as well as sexual and racial harassment, age discrimination, and disability discrimination in the workplace. After graduating from Wellesley College, Sager received an MA in history from Harvard University and a JD from UCLA School of Law. She clerked for Judge Irving Hill in the Central District of California and then spent several years as a litigator in New York before joining the Law School faculty. Sager’s latest research has focused on the taxation of damage awards and attorneys’ fees in civil rights actions.
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  • Margaret Satterthwaite
    Professor of Clinical Law;
    Faculty Director, Center for Human Rights and Global Justice;
    Director, Global Justice Clinic
    Margaret Satterthwaite’s research interests include economic and social rights, human rights and counterterrorism, and empirical methods in human rights. Satterthwaite graduated magna cum laude from NYU School of Law in 1999 and served as a law clerk to Judge Betty B. Fletcher of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1999-00 and to the judges of the International Court of Justice in 2001-02. She has worked for a variety of human rights organizations, including Amnesty International, Human Rights First, and the Commission Nationale de Verité et de Justice (Haitian Truth and Justice Commission), and has authored or co-authored more than a dozen human rights reports. She has engaged in human rights work in places such as Haiti, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, the United States, and Yemen. Satterthwaite has served as a human rights consultant and advising expert to UN agencies and special rapporteurs and has been a member of the boards of directors of several human rights organizations, including Amnesty International USA and the Global Initiative on Economic and Social Rights. She is a member of the Human Rights Reference Group of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.
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  • Jason Schultz
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Jason Schultz, director of NYU School of Law’s Technology Law and Policy Clinic, became an associate professor of clinical law at the Law School in 2013. In his clinical projects, research, and writing he addresses the ongoing challenges of balancing intellectual property and privacy law with the public interest in free expression, access to knowledge, and innovation. As an assistant clinical professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, Schultz directed the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic. He had previously been a senior staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, one of the world’s leading digital rights groups, where he founded the Patent Busting Project. With Samuelson Clinic co-director Jennifer Urban, he invented the Defensive Patent License, a tool for deescalating patent wars. After receiving his JD from Berkeley in 2000, Schultz was an intellectual property associate at Fish & Richardson and a clerk for Judge D. Lowell Jensen of the US District Court for the Northern District of California. He earned a BA with honors in public policy and women’s studies from Duke University in 1993.
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  • Bryan Stevenson
    Professor of Clinical Law
    A 1985 graduate of Harvard, with both a master’s in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government and a JD from the law school, Bryan Stevenson joined the clinical faculty at NYU School of Law in 1998. Stevenson has been representing capital defendants and death row prisoners in the Deep South since 1985, when he was a staff attorney with the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta. In 1989, he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a nonprofit law organization that focuses on social justice and human rights in the context of criminal justice reform in the United States. He is still executive director and has recently challenged extreme sentences imposed on young children in several cases before the US Supreme Court. Stevenson’s work has won him national acclaim, including the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, the Olof Palme Prize for international human rights, and awards from the National Association of Public Interest Lawyers, the American College of Trial Lawyers, and the National Lawyers Guild. In 2006, NYU presented Stevenson with its Distinguished Teaching Award. He has also received honorary degrees from several universities, including Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Georgetown University Law Center. In 2014, he was elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
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  • Kim Taylor-Thompson
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Kim Taylor-Thompson teaches courses related to criminal law and community and criminal defense. Her teaching and scholarship focus on the impact of race and gender on public policy—particularly criminal and juvenile justice policy—and the need to prepare lawyers to meet the demands of practice in and on behalf of subordinated communities. In 2013, Taylor-Thompson received the Podell Distinguished Teaching Award for excellence in teaching. Taylor-Thompson has recently returned from leave, having served for three years as the chief executive officer of Duke Corporate Education, ranked by Financial Times as the number-one global provider of customized executive education. She consulted to top teams in Fortune 500 companies and governments on issues related to strategy execution and leading in complex environments. Before entering academia, Taylor-Thompson spent a decade at the DC Public Defender Service, ultimately serving as its director. She is a frequent moderator of Socratic dialogues at academic and business conferences. Taylor-Thompson received her JD from Yale Law School and her BA from Brown University.
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  • Anthony Thompson
    Professor of Clinical Law
    Anthony Thompson teaches courses related to criminal law and civil litigation, race, and leadership. His scholarship focuses on race, offender reentry, criminal justice issues, and leadership. In his first book, published by NYU Press, Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities (2008), Thompson takes an in-depth look at the issues of reentry, race, and politics. Thompson’s most recent scholarship examines leadership and the law. He teaches a seminar in which he examines the intersection of legal education and leadership in an increasingly globalized society. The course exposes students to some fundamental leadership theory and skill development. Thompson is part of the Duke Corporate Education Global Learning Research Network and has provided executive education to a number of global companies focusing on leadership and strategy execution. In 2007, Thompson was awarded the Podell Distinguished Teaching Award by NYU School of Law. In 2010, he received the Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award, and in 2010 he was also awarded the New York University Distinguished Teaching Award. Thompson was recognized by El Diario in 2011 with “The EL” award, as one of the “outstanding Latinos in the Tri-State area,” for his community service. Thompson earned his JD at Harvard Law School and his BS Ed from Northwestern University.
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